skip to content
Manhood at Harvard : William James and others Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Manhood at Harvard : William James and others

Author: Kim Townsend
Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton, ©1996.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A century ago, while feminism began to alter our perception of the roles of women, a very different movement transformed the American ideal of manhood. Its defining terms were most clearly set forth at Harvard University in the decades following the Civil War. During those years, more than ever before in our culture, men became conscious of themselves as men. Kim Townsend introduces us to the men at Harvard who were
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Named Person: William James; William James; William James; William James
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Kim Townsend
ISBN: 0393039390 9780393039399
OCLC Number: 33865320
Description: 318 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: William James. "Is life worth living?" ; Chained to a dead man ; The man--and wife --
Teaching men manhood at Harvard. "First citizen of the republic": Charles William Eliot ; The Harvard artistocracy ; "Manly sports" ; "Scholarly manliness" ; "Man to man": the faculty and students at Harvard ; John Jay Chapman on the spirit of the age --
William James' teaching. The "undisciplinables" and the "pass men" at Harvard ; "The fullness of living itself" ; Differences with others --
On a certain blindness. "As the men saw her" ; "All the new races" ; "After all who are men?": W.E.B. Du Bois --
Smile when you carry a big stick. Teddy Roosevelt '80 and Dan Wister '82 ; After 1909.
Responsibility: Kim Townsend.

Abstract:

A century ago, while feminism began to alter our perception of the roles of women, a very different movement transformed the American ideal of manhood. Its defining terms were most clearly set forth at Harvard University in the decades following the Civil War. During those years, more than ever before in our culture, men became conscious of themselves as men. Kim Townsend introduces us to the men at Harvard who were the most influential supporters and vocal critics of.

The new ideal of manhood. At the center was Harvard psychologist and philosopher William James, whose own personal perspective was very much a man's perspective, a masculine or manly one. His career and writing mirrored the ways Harvard responded to the pressures of the era. Manhood at Harvard has a rich and varied cast of characters - indeed, some of the most influential thinkers of the time. There is Charles William Eliot, the university president who transformed a.

Somewhat provincial college that seemed almost an extension of a New England prep school into a world-class university that was taking its first steps towards America's ethnic diversity. W.E.B. Dubois pointed out the racial and gender assumptions implicit in Harvard's ideal, while George Santayana, another Harvard outsider, recognized James's "masculine directness" but turned away from his philosophy. Townsend's fascinating study penetrates a distinctive culture, the.

Legacy of which has reverberated powerfully - and provocatively - in education, politics, and society throughout the twentieth century.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/33865320>
library:oclcnum"33865320"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"1st ed."
schema:copyrightYear"1996"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1996"
schema:description"Legacy of which has reverberated powerfully - and provocatively - in education, politics, and society throughout the twentieth century."@en
schema:description"The new ideal of manhood. At the center was Harvard psychologist and philosopher William James, whose own personal perspective was very much a man's perspective, a masculine or manly one. His career and writing mirrored the ways Harvard responded to the pressures of the era. Manhood at Harvard has a rich and varied cast of characters - indeed, some of the most influential thinkers of the time. There is Charles William Eliot, the university president who transformed a."@en
schema:description"William James. "Is life worth living?" ; Chained to a dead man ; The man--and wife -- Teaching men manhood at Harvard. "First citizen of the republic": Charles William Eliot ; The Harvard artistocracy ; "Manly sports" ; "Scholarly manliness" ; "Man to man": the faculty and students at Harvard ; John Jay Chapman on the spirit of the age -- William James' teaching. The "undisciplinables" and the "pass men" at Harvard ; "The fullness of living itself" ; Differences with others -- On a certain blindness. "As the men saw her" ; "All the new races" ; "After all who are men?": W.E.B. Du Bois -- Smile when you carry a big stick. Teddy Roosevelt '80 and Dan Wister '82 ; After 1909."@en
schema:description"Somewhat provincial college that seemed almost an extension of a New England prep school into a world-class university that was taking its first steps towards America's ethnic diversity. W.E.B. Dubois pointed out the racial and gender assumptions implicit in Harvard's ideal, while George Santayana, another Harvard outsider, recognized James's "masculine directness" but turned away from his philosophy. Townsend's fascinating study penetrates a distinctive culture, the."@en
schema:description"A century ago, while feminism began to alter our perception of the roles of women, a very different movement transformed the American ideal of manhood. Its defining terms were most clearly set forth at Harvard University in the decades following the Civil War. During those years, more than ever before in our culture, men became conscious of themselves as men. Kim Townsend introduces us to the men at Harvard who were the most influential supporters and vocal critics of."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/2681845>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Manhood at Harvard : William James and others"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:workExample
umbel:isLike<http://bnb.data.bl.uk/id/resource/GB9735875>
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.