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Manly leaders in nineteenth-century British literature

Author: Daniela Garofalo
Publisher: Albany : State University of New York Press, ©2008.
Series: SUNY series, studies in the long nineteenth century.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"From the 1790s to the 1840s, the fear that Britain had become too effeminate to protect itself against the anarchic forces unleashed by the French Revolution produced in many British writers of the period a desire to portray strong leaders who could control the democratic and commercial forces of modernization. While it is commonplace in Romantic studies to emphasize that Romantic writers are interested in the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Daniela Garofalo
ISBN: 9780791473573 0791473570
OCLC Number: 145146698
Description: vii, 216 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Introduction: fantasies of national virility and William Wordsworth's poet leader --
"A left-handed way": modern masters in William Godwin's Caleb Williams --
Political seductions: the show of war in Lord Byron's Sardanapalus --
Sublime democracy and the theater of violence: authoritarianism in William Hazlitt's The life of Napoleon Buonaparte --
Communities in mourning: making capital out of loss in Thomas Carlyle's Past and present and Heroes --
"To please a woman worthy of being pleased": Darcymania in Jane Austen's Pride and prejudice --
Dependent masters and independent servants: the Gothic pleasures of British homes in Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre.
Series Title: SUNY series, studies in the long nineteenth century.
Responsibility: Daniela Garofalo.
More information:

Abstract:

"From the 1790s to the 1840s, the fear that Britain had become too effeminate to protect itself against the anarchic forces unleashed by the French Revolution produced in many British writers of the period a desire to portray strong leaders who could control the democratic and commercial forces of modernization. While it is commonplace in Romantic studies to emphasize that Romantic writers are interested in the solitary genius or hero who separates himself from the community to pursue his own creative visions, Daniela Garafalo argues instead that Romantic and early Victorian writers are interested in charismatic males - military heroes, tyrants, kings, and captains of industry - who organize modern political and economic communities, sometimes by example and sometimes by direct engagement. Reading works by William Godwin, William Wordsworth, Jane Austen, Lord Byron, William Hazlitt, Thomas Carlyle, and Charlotte Bronte, Garafalo shows how these leaders, endowed with an inherent virility rather than simply inherited rank, legitimize hierarchy anew for an age suffering from a crisis of authority."--BOOK JACKET.

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