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Manufacturing consent : the political economy of the mass media

Author: Edward S Herman; Noam Chomsky
Publisher: New York : Pantheon Books, 2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
From the Publisher: In this path breaking work, now with a new introduction, Edward S. Herman and Noam Chomsky show that, contrary to the usual image of the news media as cantankerous, obstinate, and ubiquitous in their search for truth and defense of justice, in their actual practice they defend the economic, social, and political agendas of the privileged groups that dominate domestic society, the state, and the  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Herman, Edward S.
Manufacturing consent.
New York : Pantheon Books, 2002
(OCoLC)607362789
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Edward S Herman; Noam Chomsky
ISBN: 0375714499 9780375714498
OCLC Number: 47971712
Notes: Updated ed. of: Manufacturing consent. 1st ed. c1988.
Description: lxiv, 412 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Introduction --
Preface --
1: Propaganda model --
2: Worthy and unworthy victims --
3: Legitimizing versus meaningless third world elections: El Salvador, Guatemala, and Nicaragua --
4: KGB-Bulgarian plot to kill the Pope: free-market disinformation as "news" --
5: Indochina wars (I): Vietnam --
6: Indochina wars (II): Laos and Cambodia --
7: Conclusions --
Appendix 1: US official observers in Guatemala, July 1-2, 1984 --
Appendix 2: Tagliabue's finale on the Bulgarian connection: a case study in bias --
Appendix 3: Braestrup's big story: some "freedom house exclusives" --
Notes --
Index.
Responsibility: Edward S. Herman and Noam Chomsky ; with a new introduction by the authors.
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Abstract:

From the Publisher: In this path breaking work, now with a new introduction, Edward S. Herman and Noam Chomsky show that, contrary to the usual image of the news media as cantankerous, obstinate, and ubiquitous in their search for truth and defense of justice, in their actual practice they defend the economic, social, and political agendas of the privileged groups that dominate domestic society, the state, and the global order. Based on a series of case studies-including the media's dichotomous treatment of "worthy" versus "unworthy" victims, "legitimizing" and "meaningless" Third World elections, and devastating critiques of media coverage of the U.S. wars against Indochina-Herman and Chomsky draw on decades of criticism and research to propose a Propaganda Model to explain the media's behavior and performance. Their new introduction updates the Propaganda Model and the earlier case studies, and it discusses several other applications. These include the manner in which the media covered the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement and subsequent Mexican financial meltdown of 1994-1995, the media's handling of the protests against the World Trade Organization, World Bank, and International Monetary Fund in 1999 and 2000, and the media's treatment of the chemical industry and its regulation. What emerges from this work is a powerful assessment of how propagandistic the U.S. mass media are, how they systematically fail to live up to their self-image as providers of the kind of information that people need to make sense of the world, and how we can understand their function in a radically new way.

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