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Manwatching : a field guide to human behavior

Autore: Desmond Morris
Editore: New York : H.N. Abrams, ©1977.
Edizione/Formato:   Libro : EnglishVedi tutte le edizioni e i formati
Banca dati:WorldCat
Sommario:
A catalogue of human actions, postures, gestures, facial expressions, clothing, and adornments includes explanations of their underlying causes and meanings.
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Tipo documento: Book
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: Desmond Morris
ISBN: 0810913100 9780810913103
Numero OCLC: 3334752
Descrizione: 320 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
Contenuti: Actions. Inborn actions: actions we do not have to learn --
Discovered actions: actions we discover for ourselves --
Absorbed actions: actions we acquire unknowingly from our companions --
Trained actions: actions we have to be taught --
Mixed actions: actions acquired in several ways --
Gestures. Incidental gestures: mechanical actions with secondary messages --
Expressive gestures: biological gestures of the kind we share with other animals --
Mimic gestures: gestures which transmit signals by imitation --
Schematic gestures: imitations that become abbreviated or abridged --
Symbolic gestures: gestures which represent moods and ideas --
Technical gestures: gestures used by specialist minorities --
Coded gestures: sign-language based on a formal system --
Gesture variants: personal or local variations on gestural themes --
Multimessage gestures: gestures that have many meanings --
Gesture alternatives: different gestures that transmit the same signal --
Hybrid gestures: signals made up of two original gestures --
Compound gestures: actions made up of a number of distinct elements --
Relic gestures: gestures that have survived long after their primary contexts have vanished --
Regional signals: the way signals change from country to country and district to district --
Baton signals: actions that emphasize the rhythm of words --
Guide signs: pointing and beckoning, how we show the way --
Yes/no signals: ways in which we signal agreement and acceptance, or denial and refusal --
Gaze behaviour: staring eyes and glancing eyes, the way we look at one another --
Salutation displays: hello and goodbye, greetings and farewells. Postural echo: the way friends unconsciously act in unison --
Tie-signs: signals that display personal bonds to others --
Body-contact tie-signs: the way companions touch each other in public --
Auto-contact: self-intimacies, why and how we touch ourselves --
Nonverbal leakage: clues that give us away without our knowing --Contradictory signals: giving two conflicting signals at the same time --
Shortfall signals: when we under-react despite ourselves --
Overkill signals: when we over-react --
Status displays: ways in which we signal our position in the social peck order --
Territorial behaviour: the defence of a limited area --
Barrier signals: body-defence actions in social situations --
Protective behaviour: reactions to dangers, both real and imaginary --
Submissive behaviour: how we appease our critics or attackers --
Religious displays: actions performed to placate imagined deities --
Altruistic behaviour: how do we help others at our own expense? --
Fighting behaviour: pulling punches and throwing punches, the biology of human combat --
Triumph displays: how winners celebrate and losers react --
Cut-off: actions that block in-coming visual signals when we are under stress --
Autonomic signals: actions and other changes resulting from body-stress --
Pupil signals: pupil dilations and constrictions indicating changes of mood --
Intention movements: get-ready actions that signal future intentions --
Displacement activities: agitated fill-in actions performed during periods of acute tension --
Redirected activities: actions diverted on to a bystander. Re-motivating actions: actions which stimulate a new mood as a way of eliminating an old one --
Insult signals: sneers and snubs, the ways we show disrespect and contempt --
Threat signals: attempts to intimidate without coming to blows --
Obscene signals: the symbolism of sexual insults --
Taboo zones: regions of the human body that are out of bounds --
Overexposed signals: going too far, breaking through the etiquette barrier --
Clothing signals: clothing as display, comfort and modesty --
Body adornment: social mutilations and cosmetic decorations --
Gender signals: masculine and feminine signals that help to label or emphasize the sex of the signaller --
Body self-mimicry: ways in which we imitate ourselves anatomically --
Sexual signals: the courtship and pre-copulatory sequence of the human animal --
Parental signals: maternal and paternal messages of loving care and safety --
Infantile signals: the babyface syndrome, and the signals of crying, smiling and laughing --
Animal contacts: from predators to pets, human involvement with other species --
Play patterns: play signals, play rules and playfulness --
Metasignals: how one signal can tell us about the nature of other signals --
Supernormal stimuli: the creation of stimuli stronger than their natural equivalents --
Aesthetic behaviour: our reactions to the beautiful, in nature and in art --
Laterality: lefthanded versus righthanded --
Locomotion: the twenty basic ways of moving from place to place --
Aquatic behaviour: was man more aquatic in his ancient past? --
Feeding behaviour: how and where and what we drink and eat? --
Sporting behaviour: the biology of sport, a modern hunting ritual --
Resting behavior: the postures of relaxation and the nature of sleeping and dreaming.
Responsabilità: Desmond Morris.

Abstract:

A catalogue of human actions, postures, gestures, facial expressions, clothing, and adornments includes explanations of their underlying causes and meanings.

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