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Margaret Mitchell : reporter

Autor: Margaret Mitchell; Patrick Allen
Editorial: Athens, Ga. : Hill Street Press, ©2000.
Edición/Formato:   Libro : Inglés (eng)Ver todas las ediciones y todos los formatos
Base de datos:WorldCat
Resumen:
The sixty-four columns in Margaret Mitchell: Reporter present a vivid portrait of a lively, far-ranging mind and an insightful observer well on the way to her full literary prowess long before the world even knew her name. More than a decade before Margaret Mitchell the novelist conceived the immortal fictive world of Gone With the Wind, Margaret Mitchell the reporter was pounding the real-life streets of her natal  Leer más
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Detalles

Género/Forma: Interviews
Formato físico adicional: Online version:
Mitchell, Margaret, 1900-1949.
Margaret Mitchell.
Athens, Ga. : Hill Street Press, c2000
(OCoLC)606448193
Persona designada: Margaret Mitchell
Tipo de documento: Libro/Texto
Todos autores / colaboradores: Margaret Mitchell; Patrick Allen
ISBN: 1892514869 9781892514868
Número OCLC: 44391489
Notas: Columns written for the Atlanta Journal Sunday Magazine from 1922 to 1926.
Descripción: xx, 330 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Contenido: 1. Mode and Manners. Atlanta girl sees Italian revolution ; Dancers now drown out even the cowbell ; Spring styles in slang reach Atlanta ; Who owns the school girl's nose? ; Pep, brains, and clothes win beauty contests ; What keeps women young now ; Boyish bob brings back the corset ; The cat no longer has pajamas ; Gum chewed at both weddings and funerals ; What makes the pretty girl pretty ; All dolled up like French pastry --
2. The debutante and the "new woman". Society girls take up business ; Do husbands object to their wives voting? ; How it all comes out in the wash ; Jobs before marriage for High School girls ; Pulling teeth in a harem --
3. In and out of wedlock. "No dumbbells wanted," say Atlanta debs ; Just like a woman; ditto for men ; Football players make the best husbands ; Divorces for canaries ; Wives wanted by world's greatest freaks ; Do working girls make the best wives? ; College girls tell how men should propose ; Georgia bids good-bye to elopements ; Marriage licences that are never used ; Shot three times and missed him- divorced --
4. Personality sketches. Plant wizard does miracles here ; Maxim tells of perfume, war, and poetry ; Heroine of Siege of Urfa is in Atlanta ; Bridesmaid of eighty-seven recalls Mittie Roosevelt's wedding ; Valentino declares he isn't a sheik ; Former policewoman, held in shooting, needs the help she gave to so many girls ; Two New York girls out-walk death ; Novelist loved Atlanta girl's picture ; Fulton County's first woman treasurer ; Grandma Veal speaks her mind on her 102nd birthday ; 647-pound girl deplores short skirts ; Harry Thaw sees Atlanta's battlefields ; Atlanta doctor at O. Henry's deathbead --
5. Flappers and sheiks. Laundry list sung by Altanta sub-deb ; Atlanta sub-debs pass up Tutankhamen ; Tech boys tell why girls are rushed ; Road show girls record dressers ; Only one Atlanta girl likes whiskers ; What it costs to rush a girl --
6. About Atlanta and Georgia. Spring ; Hanging over Atlanta in Borglum's swing ; Georgia's empress and women soldiers ; Camp meeting at Mount Gilead ; Crooks, debs, and financiers seek and read future ; Atlanta's favorite limericks ; General John Brown Gordon (Georgia generals, part I) ; When General Cobb wrote the Georgia code (Georgia generals, part II) ; General Wright, Georgia's hero at Gettysburg (Georgia generals, part III) ; General Benning, hero of "Burnside's Bridge" (Georgia generals, part IV) --
7. Bunko gangs and rum runners. Gay flowers made in DeKalb prison ; Lifer back in jail because he told the truth ; Why more boys and girls go insane now ; Federal prisoner finds con man king of crooks ; Gallows room at tower used as pantry ; "Honest man" wakes to find himself a crook --
8. "News of books and writers". These barren leaves by Aldous Huxley (review) ; Numerous treasure by Robert Keable (review) ; Soldiers' pay by William Faulkner (review) ; Former Atlanta woman writes novel.
Responsabilidad: edited by Patrick Allen.

Resumen:

The sixty-four columns in Margaret Mitchell: Reporter present a vivid portrait of a lively, far-ranging mind and an insightful observer well on the way to her full literary prowess long before the world even knew her name. More than a decade before Margaret Mitchell the novelist conceived the immortal fictive world of Gone With the Wind, Margaret Mitchell the reporter was pounding the real-life streets of her natal Atlanta in search of the who, what, when, and where of her popular columns in the Atlanta Journal Sunday Magazine. Defying convention, the recent debutante took the early morning streetcar to the spittoon-filled, hard-swearing offices of her big city newspaper to "hunt and peck" on an old Underwood typewriter as one of the first woman columnists at the South's largest newspaper. From 1922 until 1926, Mitchell completed dozens of articles, interviews, sketches, and book reviews, only a handful of which have ever been reprinted. Included here are those pieces singled out by Mitchell as among her favorites, those of which she was most proud. The tendency to draw parallels between the personae of the real-life Mitchell and her most famous fictional heroine are irresistible. Likewise, in this collection there are new and poignant insights into Mitchell's own sensibilities, passions, and opinions. Her portraits and personality sketches, in particular, show an early promise of her ability to draw the kind of unforgettable characters which have made her Gone With the Wind the most translated and bestselling novel in history. Even as a putatively reporter, the irrepressible personality of the observer shines through and, taken as a whole, this collection of Mitchell's journalism transcends the simple fact gathering of the reporter's trade to give a portrait of the artist as a young woman and a compelling snapshot at life in the Jazz Age South. --From dust jacket.

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Datos enlazados


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