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Margaret Throsby program : Robert Hughes 20/10/99.

Author: Robert Hughes; Margaret Throsby; Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Classic FM.
Publisher: [Sydney?] : ABC Radio Tapes, [1999]
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on Cassette : Cassette recording : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Margaret Throsby talks to Robert Hughes, arguably the best known arts commentator in the world. His work reaches a huge audience. He is a kind of Australian national monument even though he hasn't lived here for more than 30 years. He and Margaret Throsby discuss his lifelong love of fishing, expressed in his book, A jerk on one end : reflections of a mediocre fisherman. In the latter part of it he writes about  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Anecdotes
Interviews
Named Person: Robert Hughes; Robert Hughes
Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Robert Hughes; Margaret Throsby; Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Classic FM.
OCLC Number: 223013456
Notes: Label title.
Tape of interview broadcast on ABC Classic FM.
Description: On 1 side of 1 sound cassette (ca 45 min.)
Other Titles: Margaret Throsby in conversation with Robert Hughes

Abstract:

Margaret Throsby talks to Robert Hughes, arguably the best known arts commentator in the world. His work reaches a huge audience. He is a kind of Australian national monument even though he hasn't lived here for more than 30 years. He and Margaret Throsby discuss his lifelong love of fishing, expressed in his book, A jerk on one end : reflections of a mediocre fisherman. In the latter part of it he writes about conservation and the commercial fishing industry. He makes an analogy between fishing and writing: you cast your line into the depths and you don't know what you might pull out. He remembers times spent fishing on the pier at Rose Bay, Sydney, when he also developed his visual skills looking at the land and the water. He became an art critic at the age of 20, writing for The Observer in Sydney, and went on to become art critic for Time Magazine. Margaret Throsby asks him about his serious car accident in Western Australia on May 28, 1999. He says that he learnt about the management of pain. He has realised the priorities in life, put aside petty fears. The meaning of life is the strong desire to prolong life.

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Linked Data


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