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Mary E. Gawthorpe : papers, 1881-1990

Author: Mary Eleanor Gawthorpe
Edition/Format:   Archival material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The collection includes Gawthorpe's diaries and engagement books, 1918-1972, correspondence, 1903-1972 (bulk 1916-1933), and other material related to her suffrage work and to her training and career as a teacher in England. The diaries vary greatly in detail and do not provide a comprehensive account of her activities over the whole period. The correspondence includes ingoing and outgoing correspondence. Many of  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Correspondence
Ephemera
Leaflets
Pamphlets
Periodicals
Postcards
Badges
Named Person: Roger N Baldwin; John Nicholas Beffel; Alice Stone Blackwell; Harriot Stanton Blatch; Mary Eleanor Gawthorpe; Scott Nearing; E Sylvia Pankhurst; Alice Paul; Bernard Shaw; Franchot Tone; Gertrude Franchot Tone
Document Type: Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Mary Eleanor Gawthorpe
OCLC Number: 476099468
Description: 10.5 linear ft. (11 boxes)
More information:

Abstract:

The collection includes Gawthorpe's diaries and engagement books, 1918-1972, correspondence, 1903-1972 (bulk 1916-1933), and other material related to her suffrage work and to her training and career as a teacher in England. The diaries vary greatly in detail and do not provide a comprehensive account of her activities over the whole period. The correspondence includes ingoing and outgoing correspondence. Many of the letters between 1931 and 1933 concern the publication of Sylvia Pankhurst's book "The suffragette movement," and a dispute between Pankhurst and Gawthorpe over a description of Gawthorpe in a brief footnote in the book, which overlooked Gawthorpe's involvement in the women's suffrage movement in the United States following her emigration. To set the record straight, and to provide information about her American activities for a compilation of biographies of militant suffragettes for the Suffragette Fellowship in Britain, Gawthorpe solicited letters of reference from a number of political figures with whom she had worked, including Gertrude Franchot Tone and Roger Baldwin. Other correspondents addressing this issue include John Beffel, Harriot Stanton Blatch, Alice Stone Blackwell, and George Bernard Shaw. The correspondence also contains material about the split between Gawthorpe and Dora Marsden, co-editor of "The Freewoman," and correspondence with Scott Nearing, Franchot Tone, and Alice Paul. Other material in the collection deals with the WSPU and other suffrage organizations, as well as with two of Gawthorpe's initiatives in 1912: her call for a national women's hunger strike, and her petition against the forcible feeding of suffragette prisoners, which generated responses from a range of public figures, including George Bernard Shaw. There are also postcards; educational material and notes, covering Gawthorpe's training as a teacher from 1898 to 1904, as well as later periods of study and travel; miscellaneous personal papers, including material dealing with her estate up until 1990; and ephemera and periodicals, including a complete run of "The Freewoman," as well as small personal items such as a WSPU badge.

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Linked Data


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schema:description"The collection includes Gawthorpe's diaries and engagement books, 1918-1972, correspondence, 1903-1972 (bulk 1916-1933), and other material related to her suffrage work and to her training and career as a teacher in England. The diaries vary greatly in detail and do not provide a comprehensive account of her activities over the whole period. The correspondence includes ingoing and outgoing correspondence. Many of the letters between 1931 and 1933 concern the publication of Sylvia Pankhurst's book "The suffragette movement," and a dispute between Pankhurst and Gawthorpe over a description of Gawthorpe in a brief footnote in the book, which overlooked Gawthorpe's involvement in the women's suffrage movement in the United States following her emigration. To set the record straight, and to provide information about her American activities for a compilation of biographies of militant suffragettes for the Suffragette Fellowship in Britain, Gawthorpe solicited letters of reference from a number of political figures with whom she had worked, including Gertrude Franchot Tone and Roger Baldwin. Other correspondents addressing this issue include John Beffel, Harriot Stanton Blatch, Alice Stone Blackwell, and George Bernard Shaw. The correspondence also contains material about the split between Gawthorpe and Dora Marsden, co-editor of "The Freewoman," and correspondence with Scott Nearing, Franchot Tone, and Alice Paul. Other material in the collection deals with the WSPU and other suffrage organizations, as well as with two of Gawthorpe's initiatives in 1912: her call for a national women's hunger strike, and her petition against the forcible feeding of suffragette prisoners, which generated responses from a range of public figures, including George Bernard Shaw. There are also postcards; educational material and notes, covering Gawthorpe's training as a teacher from 1898 to 1904, as well as later periods of study and travel; miscellaneous personal papers, including material dealing with her estate up until 1990; and ephemera and periodicals, including a complete run of "The Freewoman," as well as small personal items such as a WSPU badge."
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