skip to content
Master of war : the life of General George H. Thomas Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Master of war : the life of General George H. Thomas

Author: Benson Bobrick
Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, ©2009.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : English : 1st Simon & Schuster hc edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Historian Bobrick argues here that George H. Thomas was the greatest and most successful general of the Civil War. Because Thomas didn't live to write his memoirs, his reputation has been largely shaped by others, most notably Grant and Sherman, who, Bobrick says, diminished Thomas' successes in their favor in their own memoirs. Born in Virginia, Thomas remained loyal to the Union, unlike fellow Virginian Robert E.  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Biography
History
Named Person: George H Thomas; George H Thomas; George Henry Thomas; George H Thomas
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Benson Bobrick
ISBN: 0743290259 9780743290258
OCLC Number: 232979131
Description: 416 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Contents: An end to innocence --
A wider world --
"A house divided" --
Mill Springs --
From Shiloh to Perryville --
Stones River --
From Tullahoma to Chickamauga --
Chattanooga --
Atlanta --
Nashville, part one --
Nashville, part two --
"The noblest figure."
Responsibility: Benson Bobrick.
More information:

Abstract:

Historian Bobrick argues here that George H. Thomas was the greatest and most successful general of the Civil War. Because Thomas didn't live to write his memoirs, his reputation has been largely shaped by others, most notably Grant and Sherman, who, Bobrick says, diminished Thomas' successes in their favor in their own memoirs. Born in Virginia, Thomas remained loyal to the Union, unlike fellow Virginian Robert E. Lee. In the entire Civil War, he never lost a battle or a movement. He was the only Union commander to destroy two Confederate armies in the field. Throughout his career, he was methodical and careful, and always prepared. Unlike Grant, he was never surprised by an enemy. Unlike Sherman, he never panicked in battle. Although historians have always regarded Thomas highly, he has never captured the public imagination, perhaps because he has lacked an outstanding biographer--until now.--From publisher description.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/232979131>
library:oclcnum"232979131"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:MediaObject
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/20895567>
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:birthDate"1816"
schema:deathDate"1870"
schema:familyName"Thomas"
schema:givenName"George Henry"
schema:givenName"George H."
schema:name"Thomas, George Henry."
schema:name"Thomas, George H. (George Henry), 1816-1870"
schema:name"Thomas, George H. (George Henry), 1816-1870."
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"1st Simon & Schuster hc ed."
schema:copyrightYear"2009"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2009"
schema:description"An end to innocence -- A wider world -- "A house divided" -- Mill Springs -- From Shiloh to Perryville -- Stones River -- From Tullahoma to Chickamauga -- Chattanooga -- Atlanta -- Nashville, part one -- Nashville, part two -- "The noblest figure.""@en
schema:description"Historian Bobrick argues here that George H. Thomas was the greatest and most successful general of the Civil War. Because Thomas didn't live to write his memoirs, his reputation has been largely shaped by others, most notably Grant and Sherman, who, Bobrick says, diminished Thomas' successes in their favor in their own memoirs. Born in Virginia, Thomas remained loyal to the Union, unlike fellow Virginian Robert E. Lee. In the entire Civil War, he never lost a battle or a movement. He was the only Union commander to destroy two Confederate armies in the field. Throughout his career, he was methodical and careful, and always prepared. Unlike Grant, he was never surprised by an enemy. Unlike Sherman, he never panicked in battle. Although historians have always regarded Thomas highly, he has never captured the public imagination, perhaps because he has lacked an outstanding biographer--until now.--From publisher description."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1153622155>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Master of war : the life of General George H. Thomas"@en
schema:numberOfPages"416"
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:workExample
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.