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Maternal employment, breastfeeding, and health : evidence from maternity leave mandates

Author: Michael Baker; Kevin Milligan; National Bureau of Economic Research.
Publisher: Cambridge, MA : National Bureau of Economic Research, ©2007.
Series: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online), working paper no. 13188.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Public health agencies around the world have renewed efforts to increase the incidence and duration of breastfeeding. Maternity leave mandates present an economic policy that could help achieve these goals. We study their efficacy focusing on a significant increase in maternity leave mandates in Canada. We find very large increases in mothers' time away from work post-birth and in the attainment of critical  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Baker; Kevin Milligan; National Bureau of Economic Research.
OCLC Number: 181337296
Notes: "June 2007."
Description: 1 online resource.
Series Title: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online), working paper no. 13188.
Responsibility: Michael Baker, Kevin S. Milligan.

Abstract:

"Public health agencies around the world have renewed efforts to increase the incidence and duration of breastfeeding. Maternity leave mandates present an economic policy that could help achieve these goals. We study their efficacy focusing on a significant increase in maternity leave mandates in Canada. We find very large increases in mothers' time away from work post-birth and in the attainment of critical breastfeeding duration thresholds. However, we find little impact on the self-reported indicators of maternal and child health captured in our data."--Abstract.

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