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A matter of interpretation : federal courts and the law : an essay

Auteur : Antonin Scalia; Amy Gutmann
Éditeur : Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, ©1997.
Collection : University Center for Human Values series.
Édition/format :   Livre : AnglaisVoir toutes les éditions et tous les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
"In exploring the neglected art of statutory interpretation, Antonin Scalia urges that judges resist the temptation to use legislative intention and legislative history. In his view, it is incompatible with democratic government to allow the meaning of a statute to be determined by what the judges think the lawgivers meant rather than by what the legislature actually promulgated. Eschewing the judicial law-making  Lire la suite...
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Détails

Type d’ouvrage : Ressource Internet
Format : Livre, Ressource Internet
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Antonin Scalia; Amy Gutmann
ISBN : 0691026300 9780691026305
Numéro OCLC : 35280772
Description : xiii, 159 pages ; 25 cm.
Contenu : Common-law courts in a civil-law system: the role of United States federal courts in interpreting the constitution and laws / Antonin Scalia --
Comment / Gordon S. Wood --
Comment / Laurence H. Tribe --
Comment / Mary Ann Glendon --
Comment / Ronald Dworkin --
Response / Antonin Scalia.
Titre de collection : University Center for Human Values series.
Responsabilité : by Antonin Scalia ; with commentary by Amy Gutmann, editor [and others].
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Résumé :

In this essay, Judge Antonin Scalia argues that the common-law mindset, although approriate in its place, is not suitable for statutory and constitutional interpretation. He urges judges to resist  Lire la suite...

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""A Matter of Interpretation" demonstrates both the attraction of Scalia's 'textualist' theory and his qualities as a judicial statesman. . . [His] elegant essay, the most concise and accessible Lire la suite...

 
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Données liées


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schema:reviewBody""In exploring the neglected art of statutory interpretation, Antonin Scalia urges that judges resist the temptation to use legislative intention and legislative history. In his view, it is incompatible with democratic government to allow the meaning of a statute to be determined by what the judges think the lawgivers meant rather than by what the legislature actually promulgated. Eschewing the judicial law-making that is the essence of common law, judges should interpret statutes and regulations by focusing on the text itself. Scalia then extends this principle to constitutional law. He proposes that we abandon the notion of an ever changing Constitution and pay attention to the Constitution's original meaning. Although not subscribing to the "strict constructionism" that would prevent applying the Constitution to modern circumstances, Scalia emphatically rejects the idea that judges can properly "smuggle" in new rights or deny old rights by using the Due Process Clause, for instance. In fact, such judicial discretion might lead to the destruction of the Bill of Rights if a majority of the judges ever wished to reach that most undesirable of goals." "This essay is followed by four commentaries by Gordon Wood, Laurence Tribe, Mary Ann Glendon, and Ronald Dworkin, who engage Justice Scalia's ideas about judicial interpretation, and the volume concludes with a response by Scalia. Dealing with one of the most fundamental issues in American law, A Matter of Interpretation reveals what is at the heart of this important debate."--Jacket."
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