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The matter of revolution : science, poetry, and politics in the age of Milton

Author: John Rogers
Publisher: Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
John Rogers addresses the literary and ideological consequences of the remarkable, if improbable, alliance between science and politics in seventeenth-century England. He looks at the cultural intersections between the English and Scientific Revolutions, concentrating on a body of work created in a brief but potent burst of intellectual activity during the period of the Civil Wars, the Interregnum, and the earliest  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Rogers, John, 1961-
Matter of revolution.
Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 1996
(OCoLC)604610170
Named Person: Margaret Cavendish Newcastle, Duchess of; Andrew Marvell; John Milton; Gerrard Winstanley; William Harvey; John Milton; Margaret Cavendish Newcastle, Duchess of; Andrew Marvell; John Milton; John Milton; Gerrard Winstanley; William Harvey; William Harvey; Andrew Marvell; Margaret Cavendish Newcastle, Duchess of; Gerrard Winstanley
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Rogers
ISBN: 0801432383 9780801432385
OCLC Number: 34151491
Description: xvi, 257 p. ; 23 cm.
Contents: The power of matter in the English Revolution --
Marvell, Winstanley, and the natural history of the green age --
Marvell and the action of virginity --
Chaos, creation, and the political science of Paradise lost --
Milton and the mysterious terms of history --
Margaret Cavendish and the gendering of the vitalist utopia --
Conclusion : Adamant liberals : the failure of the matter of revolution.
Responsibility: John Rogers.

Abstract:

John Rogers addresses the literary and ideological consequences of the remarkable, if improbable, alliance between science and politics in seventeenth-century England. He looks at the cultural intersections between the English and Scientific Revolutions, concentrating on a body of work created in a brief but potent burst of intellectual activity during the period of the Civil Wars, the Interregnum, and the earliest years of the Stuart Restoration. Rogers traces the broad implications of a seemingly outlandish cultural phenomenon: the intellectual imperative to forge an ontological connection between physical motion and political action. The work of the writers whom Rogers discusses - John Milton, Andrew Marvell, Gerrard Winstanley, William Harvey, and Margaret Cavendish - spans the spectrum of genres from medical treatise to epic poem. Despite their differences, each text participates in or reacts to one of the least understood intellectual movements in early modern England, a short-lived embrace of philosophical idealism that Rogers identifies as the Vitalist Moment. Each writer, he asserts, struggled to reconcile the new materialist science of corpuscular motion and interaction with the new political philosophy of popular sovereignty and consensus.

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