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Meccan trade and the rise of Islam

Author: Patricia Crone
Publisher: Piscataway, N.J. : Gorgias Press, 2004.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st Gorgias Press edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Patricia Crone reassesses one of the most widely accepted dogmas in contemporary accounts of the beginnings of Islam, the supposition that Mecca was a trading center thriving on the export of aromatic spices to the Mediterranean. Pointing out that the conventional opinion is based on classical accounts of the trade between south Arabia and the Mediterranean some 600 years earlier than the age of Muhammad, Dr. Crone  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Patricia Crone
ISBN: 1593331029 9781593331023
OCLC Number: 57718221
Notes: This edition is a facsimile reprint of the original edition published by Princeton University Press, New Jersey, 1987.
Description: vii, 300 p. : map ; 24 cm.
Responsibility: Patricia Crone.

Abstract:

"Patricia Crone reassesses one of the most widely accepted dogmas in contemporary accounts of the beginnings of Islam, the supposition that Mecca was a trading center thriving on the export of aromatic spices to the Mediterranean. Pointing out that the conventional opinion is based on classical accounts of the trade between south Arabia and the Mediterranean some 600 years earlier than the age of Muhammad, Dr. Crone argues that the land route described in these records was short-lived and that the Muslim sources make no mention of such goods." "In addition to changing our view of the role of trade, the author reexamines the evidence for the religious status of pre-Islamic Mecca and seeks to elucidate the nature of the sources on which we should reconstruct our picture of the birth of the new religion in Arabia."--BOOK JACKET.

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