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The mediocracy : French philosophy since the mid-1970s

Author: Dominique Lecourt
Publisher: London ; New York : Verso, 2001.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"According to Dominique Lecourt, a veritable counter-revolution in French thought has seen the period of the "master-thinkers" of the 1960s succeeded by an era of generalized mediocrity. Where Althusser or Lacan, Foucault or Derrida once held centre stage, today restorationist currents prevail in the academy and on television sets. Fuelled by a complaisant media, the contemporary French ideology seeks neither to  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Lecourt, Dominique.
Mediocracy.
London ; New York : Verso, 2001
(OCoLC)606511267
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Dominique Lecourt
ISBN: 1859847935 9781859847930 1859844308 9781859844304
OCLC Number: 44905114
Language Note: Translation of: Piètres penseurs.
Description: xv, 240 p. ; 20 cm.
Contents: The Mediocracy --
Baby Boom --
Sixties Militants --
A Fiction: 'La Pensee 68' --
Michel Foucault's Power --
The Burial of Leftism --
Gilles Deleuze's Battle --
The Liberal Transmutation of the French Libertarian --
Death and Resurrection of the Intellectual --
Good, Evil and Wisdom --
The Heady Lures of Love --
Machiavelli in Carpet Slippers --
Dissidence or Revolution?
Other Titles: Piètres penseurs.
Responsibility: Dominique Lecourt ; translated by Gregory Elliott.

Abstract:

A review of the last thirty years of French intellectual history, arguing that it has produced an intelligensia that is media-savvy but politically ineffectual.  Read more...

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"Serious students and professors of French history and culture between 1968 and 1998 will find this book fascinating ... It effectively recreates the intense intellectual atmosphere of Paris during Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""According to Dominique Lecourt, a veritable counter-revolution in French thought has seen the period of the "master-thinkers" of the 1960s succeeded by an era of generalized mediocrity. Where Althusser or Lacan, Foucault or Derrida once held centre stage, today restorationist currents prevail in the academy and on television sets. Fuelled by a complaisant media, the contemporary French ideology seeks neither to interpret nor to change the world, but is instead content to legitimate a globally hegemonic neo-liberalism." "The story Lecourt tells posits two key turning points in the career of the French intelligentsia. The first is the anti-Marxist turn of the mid-1970s, championed by the New Philosophers and prompted by disappointment in an imaginary Maoism as an alternative of official Communism. The second is the revulsion at the theoretical anti-humanism of the alleged pensee '68, sponsored by Luc Ferry and Alain Renaut's 1985 polemic of that title. Concerned to identify the significant differences masked by the construction of an anti-humanist straw man, Lecourt nevertheless defends the common critical project to which Althusser, Foucault and others were committed before and after 1968. Contrasting it with the real philosophical impostures and political abdications of the present, he calls for a resumption of traditions that made Paris the post-war intellectual capital of Europe."--Jacket."
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