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Meditations

Author: Marcus Aurelius, Emperor of Rome; Epictetus.; George Long; Russell Kirk
Publisher: South Bend, Indiana : Gateway Editions, [1956] ©1956
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Written in the form of confessions, the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius express with great beauty and tenderness the essence of Stoic philosophy. The Stoic, whose life is one of passive, meditative searching for God's truth in nature, feels that God is, ever present, and thus looks on everything and all men as his equals. Marcus Aurelius states that the Stoic lives as if upon a mountain, superior to vanities and  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Early works
Early works to 1800
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Marcus Aurelius, Emperor of Rome, 121-180.
Meditations.
South Bend, Ind. : Gateway Editions, ©1956
(OCoLC)642403696
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Marcus Aurelius, Emperor of Rome; Epictetus.; George Long; Russell Kirk
ISBN: 0895269228 : 9780895269225
OCLC Number: 4304249
Description: xvi, 205 pages ; 18 cm
Contents: Meditations / Marcus Aurelius --
Enchiridion / Epictetus.
Responsibility: Marcus Aurelius. Enchiridion / [by] Epictetus. George Long translation ; introduction by Russell Kirk.

Abstract:

"Written in the form of confessions, the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius express with great beauty and tenderness the essence of Stoic philosophy. The Stoic, whose life is one of passive, meditative searching for God's truth in nature, feels that God is, ever present, and thus looks on everything and all men as his equals. Marcus Aurelius states that the Stoic lives as if upon a mountain, superior to vanities and expecting very little from his fellow men, but helping and sympathizing with them. We are made for cooperation, like the hands, like the feet. The Stoic does not rail at misfortune, for that would be to criticize God's handiwork. Nor does he seek gratification of ambition, but rather performance of duty, and his end is not happiness, but virtuous tranquility. The Enchiridion (Manual) of Epictetus, included in this volume, exercised a profound influence on the thought of Marcus Aurelius"--Back cover.
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