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The meme machine

Author: Susan J Blackmore
Publisher: Oxford [England] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Uniquely among animals, humans are capable of imitation and so can copy from one another ideas, habits, skills, behaviors, inventions, songs and stories. These are all memes, a term first coined by Richard Dawkins in 1976. According to memetic theory, memes, like genes, are replicators, competing to get into as many brains as possible, and this memetic competition has fashioned our minds and culture, just as natural  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Blackmore, Susan J., 1951-
Meme machine.
Oxford [England] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1999
(OCoLC)607121115
Online version:
Blackmore, Susan J., 1951-
Meme machine.
Oxford [England] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1999
(OCoLC)609150899
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Susan J Blackmore
ISBN: 0198503652 9780198503651
OCLC Number: 40354641
Description: xx, 264 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Strange creatures --
Universal Darwinism --
The evolution of culture --
Taking the meme's eye view --
Three problems with memes --
The big brain --
The origins of language --
Meme-gene coevolution --
The limits of sociobiology --
'An orgasm saved my life' --
Sex in the modern world --
A memetic theory of altruism --
The altruism trick --
Memes of the New Age --
Religions as memeplexes --
Into the Internet --
The ultimate memeplex --
Out of the meme race.
Responsibility: Susan Blackmore.
More information:

Abstract:

Uniquely among animals, humans are capable of imitation and so can copy from one another ideas, habits, skills, behaviors, inventions, songs and stories. These are all memes, a term first coined by Richard Dawkins in 1976. According to memetic theory, memes, like genes, are replicators, competing to get into as many brains as possible, and this memetic competition has fashioned our minds and culture, just as natural selection has designed our bodies. Can the analogy between memes and genes lead us to powerful new theories that actually explain anything important? This book ends by confronting the deepest questions of all about ourselves: the nature of the inner self, the part of us that is the centre of our consciousness, that feels emotions, has memories, holds beliefs and makes decisions. Author Blackmore contends that this inner self is an illusion, a creation of the memes for the sake of their own replication.--From publisher description.

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WorldCat User Reviews (2)

Memetics as a science is still dead.

by vleighton (WorldCat user published 2012-04-22) Fair Permalink

Several years ago, Richard Dawkins came to Winona State University for a lecture. Afterward, I asked him how he would respond to the attack on memes by Steven Pinker in his book How the Mind Works. Dawkins deflected the question and simply referred me to this book by Blackmore.

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Just a thought

by blingflypimp (WorldCat user published 2007-12-04) Excellent Permalink
The most awesome book I've ever read! Ever!
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