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Memoirs of the crusades,

Author: Geoffroi de Villehardouin; Jean Joinville, sire de
Publisher: London, J.M. Dent; New York, E.P Dutton [1908]
Series: Everyman's library., History.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The Memoirs of Villehardouin and Joinville, here reproduced in an English form, are the first in date, those of Villehardouin having been written probably in the days of our King John, early in the thirteenth century; while those of Joinville were completed about a century later, in October 1309, shortly after our Edward II had begun to reign. Both are monuments of the French language, and of French prose, at an  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Villehardouin, Geoffroi de, -approximately 1212.
Memoirs of the crusades.
London, J.M. Dent; New York, E.P Dutton [1908]
(OCoLC)654344757
Named Person: Louis, King of France; Louis, King of France
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Geoffroi de Villehardouin; Jean Joinville, sire de
OCLC Number: 346844
Description: xli, [1], 340 pages 18 cm.
Contents: Introduction. --
Villehardouin's chronicle of the fourth crusade and the conquest of Constantinople. --
Joinville's chronicle of the crusade of St. Lewis. --
Index.
Series Title: Everyman's library., History.
Responsibility: by Villehardouin & De Joinville; translated by Sir Frank Marzials.

Abstract:

The Memoirs of Villehardouin and Joinville, here reproduced in an English form, are the first in date, those of Villehardouin having been written probably in the days of our King John, early in the thirteenth century; while those of Joinville were completed about a century later, in October 1309, shortly after our Edward II had begun to reign. Both are monuments of the French language, and of French prose, at an early stage of development. Both are written by eye-witnesses who had taken an important part, in the case of Villehardouin a very important part, in what they describe. Both deal with stirring episodes in one of the most stirring chapters in human history, the chapter that tells how, for some three centuries, Christendom put forth its power to capture, and again recapture, "those holy fields over whose acres walked those blessed feet which, fourteen hundred years ago, were nailed, for our advantage, on the bitter cross," and both serve to illustrate the varied motives that went to the initiation and maintenance of that great movement. - Introduction.

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