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The memory of bones : body, being, and experience among the classic Maya

Author: Stephen D Houston; David Stuart; Karl A Taube
Publisher: Austin : University of Texas Press, 2006.
Series: Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long series in Latin American and Latino art and culture.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
All of human experience flows from bodies that feel, express emotion, and think about what such experiences mean. But is it possible for us, embodied as we are in a particular time and place, to know how people of long ago thought about the body and its experiences? In this groundbreaking book, three leading experts on the Classic Maya (ca. AD 250 to 850) marshal a vast array of evidence from Maya iconography and  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Houston, Stephen D.
Memory of bones.
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2006
(OCoLC)607837801
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Stephen D Houston; David Stuart; Karl A Taube
ISBN: 0292712944 9780292712942
OCLC Number: 61660268
Description: 324 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
Contents: The classic Maya body --
Bodies and portraits --
Ingestion --
Senses --
Emotions --
Dishonor --
Words on wings --
Dance, music, masking --
Epilogue : body, being, and experience among the classic Maya.
Series Title: Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long series in Latin American and Latino art and culture.
Responsibility: Stephen Houston, David Stuart, Karl Taube.
More information:

Abstract:

All of human experience flows from bodies that feel, express emotion, and think about what such experiences mean. But, is it possible for us to know how people of long ago thought about the body and  Read more...

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