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Mexican Phoenix : Our Lady of Guadalupe : image and tradition across five centuries

Author: D A Brading
Publisher: Cambridge, UK ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In 1999 Pope John Paul II proclaimed Our Lady of Guadalupe a patron saint of the Americas. According to oral tradition and historical documents, in 1531 Mary appeared as a beautiful Aztec princess to Juan Diego, a poor Indian. Speaking to him in his own language, she asked him to tell the bishop her name was La Virgen de Guadalupe and that she wanted a church built on the mountain. During a second visit, the image  Read more...
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Details

Named Person: Mary, Blessed Virgin Saint; Mary, Mother of Jesus Christ; Marie, Sainte Vierge
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: D A Brading
ISBN: 0521801311 9780521801317 0521531608 9780521531603
OCLC Number: 44868981
Description: xvii, 444 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Contents: Image and typology --
Myth and history --
The woman of the apocalypse --
Indian seer --
Presence and tradition --
Patron of Mexico --
Divine idea --
Heavenly painting --
Myth and scepticism --
The last resort --
History and infallibility --
The coronation --
Juan Diego --
Nican mopohua --
Epiphany and revelation.
Responsibility: D.A. Brading.
More information:

Abstract:

In 1999 Pope John Paul II proclaimed Our Lady of Guadalupe a patron saint of the Americas. According to oral tradition and historical documents, in 1531 Mary appeared as a beautiful Aztec princess to Juan Diego, a poor Indian. Speaking to him in his own language, she asked him to tell the bishop her name was La Virgen de Guadalupe and that she wanted a church built on the mountain. During a second visit, the image of the Virgin miraculously appeared on his cape. Through the centuries, the enigmatic power of this image has aroused such fervent devotion in Mexico that it has served as the banner of the rebellion against Spanish rule and, despite skepticism and anticlericalism, still remains a potent symbol of the modern nation. In Mexican Phoenix, David Brading traces the intellectual origins, the sudden efflorescence, and the theology that has sustained the tradition of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Brading also documents the interaction of religion and patriotism, and describes how the image has served as a banner both for independence and for the Church in its struggle against the Liberal and revolutionary state.

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Linked Data


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