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Michigan ghost towns of the Lower Peninsula.

Author: Roy L Dodge
Publisher: Las Vegas, NV : Glendon Pub., 1990.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Book Description: Michigan: the way it was. Michigan Ghost Towns compiles settlements and communities that have faded into Michigan's history and legend: Bamfield and Bryant were stations or stops on the AuSable & North Western Railway, a narrow gauge track extending from AuSable to Commins, in Oscoda County. In 1908 Charlie Cote, a Frenchman, was the only inhabitant of Bryant. Orral A. Wardlow, now living at  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Local history
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Roy L Dodge
ISBN: 0932212646 : 9780932212641
OCLC Number: 22602318
Notes: Compiled by Roy L. Dodge.
Reprint of vols. 1 and 2 of Michigan ghost towns, originally published in 1970 and 1971.
Spine title: Michigan ghost towns, Lower Peninsula.
Description: 120, 191 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Contents: Volume 1: --
First settler and how towns were named --
Growth and decline of population-how to identify ghost town sites --
Ghost county of Manitou-Restoration of ghost towns --
Spectacular ghost towns of the early 1800s --
Alcona Country ghost towns and the "Lost gold mine of Michigan" --
Alpena County ghost towns and the lost ship Pewabic --
Antrim County ghost towns --
Arenac County ghost towns and the D B C & A Railroad --
Bay County ghost towns --
Benzie County ghost towns --
Charlevoix ghost towns and treasure on Lake Michigan Islands --
Clare Country ghost towns and the world's first logging railroad --
Crawford County ghost towns and Michigan's only stand of virgin pine --
Emmet County ghost towns and Fort Michilimackinac --
Gladwin county ghost towns --
Grand Traverse County ghost towns and the toughest railroad junction in Michigan --
Iosco County ghost towns and Michigan's most spectacular ghost town in history --
Isabella County ghost towns and the man who built his own coffin --
Kalkaska County ghost towns with 42 former towns and stations, one a real live ghost town. Volume 2: --
Early settlement of Northern Michigan --
Growth of villages --
Northern Michigan in early 1900s --
Lake Country ghost towns and the only Negro ghost town I the history of Michigan --
Leelenau County ghost towns and Sleeping Bear Dunes --
Manistee County ghost towns and the town that disappeared into Lake Michigan --
Mason County ghost towns and one of only a few ghost towns in Michigan designated with a State Historical maker --
Mecosta County ghost towns and the day Paris burned --
Midland County ghost towns and the village that was laid out in pie-shaped lots around a circle --
Missaukee County ghost towns and Michigan's biggest ghost town --
Montmorency County ghost towns and the ghost town that came back --
Newaygo County ghost towns and how "Pinchtown" got it name --
Oceana County and the ghost towns of Tigris, Cob-Moo-Sa, and Papa Me --
Ogemaw County ghost towns and the "Lost City of Damon" --
Osceola County ghost towns and the home of "The Old Rugged Cross" --
Oscoda County ghost towns and the story of McKinley --
Otsego County ghost towns and the famous "Glass Bottle Fence" --
Presque Isle County ghost towns and the county that had two county seats at the same time --
Roscommon county ghost towns and the "Hermit of Treasure Island" --
Wexford County ghost towns and the "Battle of Sherman" --
About the author --
Acknowledgments.
Other Titles: Michigan ghost towns, Lower Peninsula

Abstract:

Book Description: Michigan: the way it was. Michigan Ghost Towns compiles settlements and communities that have faded into Michigan's history and legend: Bamfield and Bryant were stations or stops on the AuSable & North Western Railway, a narrow gauge track extending from AuSable to Commins, in Oscoda County. In 1908 Charlie Cote, a Frenchman, was the only inhabitant of Bryant. Orral A. Wardlow, now living at Glennie (1970), said Charlie could feed and sleep half-a-dozen people and his place was ""modestly"" famous for his pea soup. Wardlow said Harry Garrett and Ray Rose were supervisors on the railroad. ""The train, which made one round trip daily, was made up of 20 to 25 bunk cars for hauling logs, and whatever boxcars were needed to haul freight, which was not much. The daily arrival of this train at Glennie was something to look forward to, and greeted by the whole town."" ""Billie Ellis, the conductor, would go into Joe Solomon's general store and help himself to a smoked herring that was always handy on top of the counter, "" Wardlow said. ""I don't remember that he ever paid for one, and Joe never complained. It seemed to be a matter of course that Billie had his herring."" Averill: The former village of Averill, famous during the early logging days of Michigan and the Saginaw Valley, lays in a built up business section bordering old US-10 highway between Sanford and Midland. Present day signs advertising a lumber yard, cocktail lounge, and other business places named ""Red Keg"" are the only reminders of the notorious saloon with a whiskey keg mounted on a pole and painted red that inspired lumberjacks to call the place ""Red Keg."" Located on the Tittabawassee River, and later the terminus of the Flint and Pere Marquette Railroad, Averill was the gateway to the vast expanses of white pine timber in the world's most famous lumbering center, the Saginaw Valley. Red Keg was made famous in legends and songs of the lumberjacks. The Valley's most notorious fight between Silver Jack Driscoll and Big Joe Fournier occurred in this saloon, first operated by Billy McCrary, who was no slouch as a riverman and rough and tumble fighter. Later the Red Keg was run by Edward Francis, who moved to Michigan from Canada. After the big fire that destroyed most of the village in 1875-76 Francis moved to Sandford where he opened another hotel.

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   schema:description "Volume 1: -- First settler and how towns were named -- Growth and decline of population-how to identify ghost town sites -- Ghost county of Manitou-Restoration of ghost towns -- Spectacular ghost towns of the early 1800s -- Alcona Country ghost towns and the "Lost gold mine of Michigan" -- Alpena County ghost towns and the lost ship Pewabic -- Antrim County ghost towns -- Arenac County ghost towns and the D B C & A Railroad -- Bay County ghost towns -- Benzie County ghost towns -- Charlevoix ghost towns and treasure on Lake Michigan Islands -- Clare Country ghost towns and the world's first logging railroad -- Crawford County ghost towns and Michigan's only stand of virgin pine -- Emmet County ghost towns and Fort Michilimackinac -- Gladwin county ghost towns -- Grand Traverse County ghost towns and the toughest railroad junction in Michigan -- Iosco County ghost towns and Michigan's most spectacular ghost town in history -- Isabella County ghost towns and the man who built his own coffin -- Kalkaska County ghost towns with 42 former towns and stations, one a real live ghost town."@en ;
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