skip to content
Microalgal biotechnology : integration and economy Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Microalgal biotechnology : integration and economy

Author: Clemens Posten; Christian Walter
Publisher: Berlin ; Boston : Walter de Gruyter, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Clemens Posten; Christian Walter
ISBN: 9783110298277 3110298279
OCLC Number: 808316426
Description: xxi, 319 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 25 cm.
Contents: Machine generated contents note: 1.Introduction --
Integration in microalgal biotechnology / Clemens Posten --
1.1.Integration on the process level --
1.2.Integration on the metabolic level --
1.3.Integration into environmental conditions --
1.4.Adaptation to cultural realities --
2.Products from microalgae: An overview Integrated production processes / Rosa Rosello Sastre --
2.1.Microalgae: An introduction --
2.2.Products --
2.2.1.Use and production of algal biomass --
2.2.2.Microalgae for human nutrition --
2.2.2.1.Spirulina (Arthrospira) --
2.2.2.2.Chlorella --
2.2.2.3.Dunaliella salina --
2.2.3.Microalgae for animal feed --
2.2.4.Microalgae as natural fertilizer --
2.2.5.Microalgae in cosmetics --
2.2.6.Fine chemicals --
2.2.6.1.PUFAs --
2.2.6.2.Pigments --
Pigments as antioxidants --
Pigments as natural colorants --
2.2.6.3.Polysaccharides --
2.2.6.4.Recombinant proteins --
2.2.6.5.Stable isotopes --
2.2.7.Micro- and nanostructured particles --
2.2.8.Bulk chemicals --
2.2.9.Energy production from microalgae --
2.2.9.1.Biodiesel --
2.2.9.2.Bio-ethanol --
2.2.9.3.Bio-hydrogen --
2.2.9.4.Bio-gas --
2.2.9.5.Biorefinery of microalgae --
2.3.Conclusion --
References --
3.Spirulina production in volcano lakes: From natural resources to human welfare / Otto Pulz --
3.1.Introduction --
3.2.Natural Spirulina lakes in Myanmar --
3.3.Environmental parameters of Myanmar Spirulina lakes --
3.4.Spirulina production from natural lakes --
3.4.1.Harvesting --
3.4.2.Washing and dewatering --
3.4.3.Extrusion and sun drying --
3.4.4.Lake-side enhancement ponds --
3.5.Sustainable Spirulina production from volcanic crater lakes --
3.6.Myanmar Spirulina products --
3.7.Spirulina as biofertilizer --
3.8.Spirulina as a biogas enhancer --
3.9.Spirulina as a source of biofuel --
3.10.Myanmar and German cooperation in microalgae biotechnology --
3.11.Discussion --
3.12.Conclusion --
Acknowledgments --
References --
4.Case study of a temperature-controlled outdoor PBR system in Bremen / L. Thomsen --
Acknowledgments --
References --
5.Algae for aquaculture and animal feeds / Ingrid Lupatsch --
5.1.Introduction --
5.2.Microalgae use in aquaculture hatcheries --
5.2.1.Microalgal strains used in aquaculture hatcheries --
5.2.2.Methods of microalgae cultivation for aquaculture --
5.2.3.Role of microalgae in aquaculture hatcheries --
5.2.3.1.Microalgae as a feed source for filter-feeding aquaculture species --
5.2.3.2.Microalgae as a feed source for zooplanktonic live prey --
5.2.3.3.Benthic microalgae as a feed source for gastropod mollusks and echinoderms --
5.2.3.4.Addition of microalgae to fish larval rearing tanks --
5.2.3.5.Use of microalgal concentrates in aquaculture hatcheries --
5.3.Use of algae in formulated feeds for aquaculture species and terrestrial livestock --
5.3.1.Algae as a supplement to enhance the nutritional value of formulated feeds --
5.3.1.1.Vitamins and minerals --
5.3.1.2.Pigments --
5.3.1.3.Fatty acids --
5.3.2.Algae as a potential feed ingredient: source of protein and energy --
5.4.Outlook --
References --
6.Algae as an approach to combat malnutrition in developing countries / Denis von der Weid --
6.1.Introduction --
6.2.Algae in human food --
6.3.Microalgae as a solution against malnutrition: meet Spirulina --
6.4.Small-scale Spirulina production as a development tool --
6.5.Spirulina as a business to combat malnutrition --
6.6.Spirulina and its place in food aid and development policies --
6.7.Evidence of Spirulina in malnutrition --
6.8.Conclusion --
Acknowledgements --
References --
7.Hydrogen production by natural and semiartificial systems / Matthias Rogner --
7.1.Biological hydrogen production of microorganisms --
7.2.Photobiological hydrogen production by green algae --
7.3.Photohydrogenproduction by cyanobacterial design cells --
7.4.Photohydrogen production by a "biobattery" --
7.5.Photobioreactor design for hydrogen production --
7.6.Photobioreactor geometry --
7.7.Process control --
7.8.Upscaling strategies --
References --
8.The carotenoid astaxanthin from Haematococcus pluvialis / Carola Griehl --
8.1.Introduction --
8.2.Characteristics and biosynthesis --
8.2.1.Chemical forms of astaxanthin --
8.2.2.Astaxanthin biosynthesis --
8.2.3.Function of astaxanthin --
8.3.Haematococcus pluvialis --
8.3.1.General characteristics --
8.3.2.Factors responsible for ax accumulation --
8.3.3.Industrial production of Haematococcus --
8.4.Conclusions and outlook --
References --
9.Screening and development of antiviral compound candidates from phototrophic microorganisms / Christian Walter --
9.1.Introduction --
9.2.Supply of natural compounds from microalgae --
9.3.Sterilizable photobioreactors --
9.4.Antiviral agents from microalgae --
9.5.Antiviral screening --
9.5.1.Primary target of screening --
9.5.2.Smart screening approach --
9.5.3.Basic process sequence --
9.5.4.Antiviral activity and immunostimulating effects of Arthrospira platensis --
9.5.5.Characterization of novel antiviral spirulan-like compounds --
9.6.Conclusion --
Acknowledgements --
References --
10.Natural product drug discovery from microalgae / Mark Bronstrup --
10.1.Introduction --
10.1.1.Eukaryotic microalgae --
10.1.1.1.Dinoflagellates --
10.1.1.2.Diatoms --
10.1.2.Cyanobacteria --
10.1.2.1.Proteinase inhibitors --
10.1.2.2.Cytotoxic compounds --
10.1.2.3.Antiviral substances --
10.1.2.4.Antimicrobial metabolites --
10.1.2.5.Miscellaneous bioactivities --
10.1.3.Three examples of current microalgal drug research projects --
10.1.3.1.Dolastatins as leads for anti-cancer drugs --
10.1.3.2.Cryptophycins as leads for anti-cancer drugs --
10.1.3.3.Microcystins as targeted anti-cancer drugs --
10.1.4.Outlook --
References --
11.Biorefining of microalgae: Production of high-value products, bulk chemicals and biofuels Socio-economic and environmental considerations / Rene H. Wijffels --
11.1.Introduction --
11.2.Structural biorefining approach of microalgae --
11.2.1.Approach --
11.2.2.Cell disruption, fractionation and mild cell disruption of organelles --
11.2.3.Extraction and fractionation of high-value components --
11.2.4.Economically feasible continuous biorefining concept --
11.3.Conclusions --
References --
12.Development of a microalgal pilot plant: A generic approach / Garry Henderson --
12.1.Understanding the aims of the pilot plant --
12.2.Pilot plant location and site selection --
12.3.Develop the process flow diagram --
12.4.Know what will be required to conduct experiments and measure the data --
12.5.Sizing of the units --
12.6.Plant layout --
12.7.HAZOP study --
12.8.Multidisciplinary review of the design --
12.9.Tender for plant construction --
12.10.Finalize the design --
References --
13.Finding the bottleneck: A research strategy for improved biomass production / Francis-Andre Wollman --
13.1.Introduction: What do we expect from cell engineering? --
13.1.1.The need for domestication of microalgae --
13.1.2.Limitation of traditional approaches to strain improvement --
13.2.Algal domestication through chloroplast genetic engineering --
13.2.1.Chloroplast engineering in Chlamydomonas: progress and challenges --
13.2.2.A synthetic biology approach to chloroplast metabolic engineering --
13.2.3.Mitigating the risks and concerns of GM algae --
13.3.Algal domestication through nucleus genetic engineering --
13.3.1.Improving light to biomass conversion by regulation of the pigment optical density of algal cultures --
13.4.Models for predicting growth in photobioreactors --
13.4.1.PAM fluorimetry: a keyhole to look into the photosynthetic machinery --
13.4.2.Microalgae cultivation in photobioreactors: the fluctuating light effects --
13.4.3.Standard model for growth under an exponential light gradient --
13.5.Cells' response to changing environments: the example of nitrogen limitation --
Acknowledgments --
References --
14.Trends driving microalgae-based fuels into economical production / Joao Navalho --
14.1.Introduction --
14.2.Leading trends --
14.2.1.Microalgae biorefinery for food, feed, fertilizer and energy production --
14.2.2.Biofuel production from low-cost microalgae grown in wastewater --
14.2.3.Biogas upgrading with microalgae production for production of electricity --
14.2.4.Hydrocarbon milking of modified Botryococcus microalgae strains --
14.2.5.Hydrogen production combining direct and indirect microalgae biophotolysis --
14.2.6.Direct ethanol production from autotrophic cyanobacteria --
14.3.Production platforms --
14.3.1.Ocean --
14.3.2.Lakes --
14.3.3.Raceways --
14.3.4.Photobioreactors --
14.3.5.Fermenters --
14.4.Conclusions --
References --
15.Microalgal production systems: Global impact of industry scale-up / Ben Hankamer --
15.1.Microalgal biotechnology --
15.2.Global challenges, production and demand --
15.2.1.Global fuel production and demand --
15.2.2.Global food production and demand --
15.2.3.Solar irradiance and areal requirement --
15.2.4.Global challenges --
15.3.Potential production and limitations --
15.3.1.Solar energy and geographic location --
15.3.2.Potential productivity --
15.3.3.Land resources --
15.3.4.Carbon management and associated costs --
15.3.4.1.CO2 requirements --
15.3.4.2.CO2 utilization and sequestration --
15.3.4.3.CO2 delivery --
15.3.5.Nutrient management and associated costs --
15.3.5.1.Phosphorus --
15.3.5.2.Nitrogen --
15.3.5.3.Nutrient recycling --
15.3.6.Water management and associated costs --
15.4.Global impact of scale-up --
15.4.1.Addressing world production --
15.4.2.Economics of large-scale microalgal production systems --
15.4.3.Techno-economic analysis of microalgal production systems --
15.4.3.1.Cultivation systems --
15.4.3.2.Impact of capital costs --
15.4.3.3.Downstream processing --
15.4.3.4.Harvesting and dewatering --
15.4.4.Dedicated versus integrated production models --
15.4.5.Business models --
15.4.6.Pathways to commercialization --
15.5.Conclusion --
References.
Responsibility: edited by Clemens Posten and Christian Walter.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(2)

User lists with this item (1)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/808316426> # Microalgal biotechnology : integration and economy
    a schema:CreativeWork, schema:Book ;
   library:oclcnum "808316426" ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1184080567#Place/berlin> ; # Berlin
   library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/gw> ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://dbpedia.org/resource/Boston> ; # Boston
   schema:about <http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2010002804> ; # Microalgae--Biotechnology
   schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1751662> ; # Microalgae--Biotechnology
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1184080567#Topic/microalgae_biotechnology_economic_aspects> ; # Microalgae--Biotechnology--Economic aspects
   schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/579.8/e23/> ;
   schema:bookFormat bgn:PrintBook ;
   schema:contributor <http://viaf.org/viaf/258937427> ; # Clemens Posten
   schema:contributor <http://viaf.org/viaf/259233587> ; # Christian Walter
   schema:datePublished "2012" ;
   schema:description "Machine generated contents note: 1.Introduction -- Integration in microalgal biotechnology / Clemens Posten -- 1.1.Integration on the process level -- 1.2.Integration on the metabolic level -- 1.3.Integration into environmental conditions -- 1.4.Adaptation to cultural realities -- 2.Products from microalgae: An overview Integrated production processes / Rosa Rosello Sastre -- 2.1.Microalgae: An introduction -- 2.2.Products -- 2.2.1.Use and production of algal biomass -- 2.2.2.Microalgae for human nutrition -- 2.2.2.1.Spirulina (Arthrospira) -- 2.2.2.2.Chlorella -- 2.2.2.3.Dunaliella salina -- 2.2.3.Microalgae for animal feed -- 2.2.4.Microalgae as natural fertilizer -- 2.2.5.Microalgae in cosmetics -- 2.2.6.Fine chemicals -- 2.2.6.1.PUFAs -- 2.2.6.2.Pigments -- Pigments as antioxidants -- Pigments as natural colorants -- 2.2.6.3.Polysaccharides -- 2.2.6.4.Recombinant proteins -- 2.2.6.5.Stable isotopes -- 2.2.7.Micro- and nanostructured particles -- 2.2.8.Bulk chemicals -- 2.2.9.Energy production from microalgae -- 2.2.9.1.Biodiesel -- 2.2.9.2.Bio-ethanol -- 2.2.9.3.Bio-hydrogen -- 2.2.9.4.Bio-gas -- 2.2.9.5.Biorefinery of microalgae -- 2.3.Conclusion -- References -- 3.Spirulina production in volcano lakes: From natural resources to human welfare / Otto Pulz -- 3.1.Introduction -- 3.2.Natural Spirulina lakes in Myanmar -- 3.3.Environmental parameters of Myanmar Spirulina lakes -- 3.4.Spirulina production from natural lakes -- 3.4.1.Harvesting -- 3.4.2.Washing and dewatering -- 3.4.3.Extrusion and sun drying -- 3.4.4.Lake-side enhancement ponds -- 3.5.Sustainable Spirulina production from volcanic crater lakes -- 3.6.Myanmar Spirulina products -- 3.7.Spirulina as biofertilizer -- 3.8.Spirulina as a biogas enhancer -- 3.9.Spirulina as a source of biofuel -- 3.10.Myanmar and German cooperation in microalgae biotechnology -- 3.11.Discussion -- 3.12.Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 4.Case study of a temperature-controlled outdoor PBR system in Bremen / L. Thomsen -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 5.Algae for aquaculture and animal feeds / Ingrid Lupatsch -- 5.1.Introduction -- 5.2.Microalgae use in aquaculture hatcheries -- 5.2.1.Microalgal strains used in aquaculture hatcheries -- 5.2.2.Methods of microalgae cultivation for aquaculture -- 5.2.3.Role of microalgae in aquaculture hatcheries -- 5.2.3.1.Microalgae as a feed source for filter-feeding aquaculture species -- 5.2.3.2.Microalgae as a feed source for zooplanktonic live prey -- 5.2.3.3.Benthic microalgae as a feed source for gastropod mollusks and echinoderms -- 5.2.3.4.Addition of microalgae to fish larval rearing tanks -- 5.2.3.5.Use of microalgal concentrates in aquaculture hatcheries -- 5.3.Use of algae in formulated feeds for aquaculture species and terrestrial livestock -- 5.3.1.Algae as a supplement to enhance the nutritional value of formulated feeds -- 5.3.1.1.Vitamins and minerals -- 5.3.1.2.Pigments -- 5.3.1.3.Fatty acids -- 5.3.2.Algae as a potential feed ingredient: source of protein and energy -- 5.4.Outlook -- References -- 6.Algae as an approach to combat malnutrition in developing countries / Denis von der Weid -- 6.1.Introduction -- 6.2.Algae in human food -- 6.3.Microalgae as a solution against malnutrition: meet Spirulina -- 6.4.Small-scale Spirulina production as a development tool -- 6.5.Spirulina as a business to combat malnutrition -- 6.6.Spirulina and its place in food aid and development policies -- 6.7.Evidence of Spirulina in malnutrition -- 6.8.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 7.Hydrogen production by natural and semiartificial systems / Matthias Rogner -- 7.1.Biological hydrogen production of microorganisms -- 7.2.Photobiological hydrogen production by green algae -- 7.3.Photohydrogenproduction by cyanobacterial design cells -- 7.4.Photohydrogen production by a "biobattery" -- 7.5.Photobioreactor design for hydrogen production -- 7.6.Photobioreactor geometry -- 7.7.Process control -- 7.8.Upscaling strategies -- References -- 8.The carotenoid astaxanthin from Haematococcus pluvialis / Carola Griehl -- 8.1.Introduction -- 8.2.Characteristics and biosynthesis -- 8.2.1.Chemical forms of astaxanthin -- 8.2.2.Astaxanthin biosynthesis -- 8.2.3.Function of astaxanthin -- 8.3.Haematococcus pluvialis -- 8.3.1.General characteristics -- 8.3.2.Factors responsible for ax accumulation -- 8.3.3.Industrial production of Haematococcus -- 8.4.Conclusions and outlook -- References -- 9.Screening and development of antiviral compound candidates from phototrophic microorganisms / Christian Walter -- 9.1.Introduction -- 9.2.Supply of natural compounds from microalgae -- 9.3.Sterilizable photobioreactors -- 9.4.Antiviral agents from microalgae -- 9.5.Antiviral screening -- 9.5.1.Primary target of screening -- 9.5.2.Smart screening approach -- 9.5.3.Basic process sequence -- 9.5.4.Antiviral activity and immunostimulating effects of Arthrospira platensis -- 9.5.5.Characterization of novel antiviral spirulan-like compounds -- 9.6.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 10.Natural product drug discovery from microalgae / Mark Bronstrup -- 10.1.Introduction -- 10.1.1.Eukaryotic microalgae -- 10.1.1.1.Dinoflagellates -- 10.1.1.2.Diatoms -- 10.1.2.Cyanobacteria -- 10.1.2.1.Proteinase inhibitors -- 10.1.2.2.Cytotoxic compounds -- 10.1.2.3.Antiviral substances -- 10.1.2.4.Antimicrobial metabolites -- 10.1.2.5.Miscellaneous bioactivities -- 10.1.3.Three examples of current microalgal drug research projects -- 10.1.3.1.Dolastatins as leads for anti-cancer drugs -- 10.1.3.2.Cryptophycins as leads for anti-cancer drugs -- 10.1.3.3.Microcystins as targeted anti-cancer drugs -- 10.1.4.Outlook -- References -- 11.Biorefining of microalgae: Production of high-value products, bulk chemicals and biofuels Socio-economic and environmental considerations / Rene H. Wijffels -- 11.1.Introduction -- 11.2.Structural biorefining approach of microalgae -- 11.2.1.Approach -- 11.2.2.Cell disruption, fractionation and mild cell disruption of organelles -- 11.2.3.Extraction and fractionation of high-value components -- 11.2.4.Economically feasible continuous biorefining concept -- 11.3.Conclusions -- References -- 12.Development of a microalgal pilot plant: A generic approach / Garry Henderson -- 12.1.Understanding the aims of the pilot plant -- 12.2.Pilot plant location and site selection -- 12.3.Develop the process flow diagram -- 12.4.Know what will be required to conduct experiments and measure the data -- 12.5.Sizing of the units -- 12.6.Plant layout -- 12.7.HAZOP study -- 12.8.Multidisciplinary review of the design -- 12.9.Tender for plant construction -- 12.10.Finalize the design -- References -- 13.Finding the bottleneck: A research strategy for improved biomass production / Francis-Andre Wollman -- 13.1.Introduction: What do we expect from cell engineering? -- 13.1.1.The need for domestication of microalgae -- 13.1.2.Limitation of traditional approaches to strain improvement -- 13.2.Algal domestication through chloroplast genetic engineering -- 13.2.1.Chloroplast engineering in Chlamydomonas: progress and challenges -- 13.2.2.A synthetic biology approach to chloroplast metabolic engineering -- 13.2.3.Mitigating the risks and concerns of GM algae -- 13.3.Algal domestication through nucleus genetic engineering -- 13.3.1.Improving light to biomass conversion by regulation of the pigment optical density of algal cultures -- 13.4.Models for predicting growth in photobioreactors -- 13.4.1.PAM fluorimetry: a keyhole to look into the photosynthetic machinery -- 13.4.2.Microalgae cultivation in photobioreactors: the fluctuating light effects -- 13.4.3.Standard model for growth under an exponential light gradient -- 13.5.Cells' response to changing environments: the example of nitrogen limitation -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 14.Trends driving microalgae-based fuels into economical production / Joao Navalho -- 14.1.Introduction -- 14.2.Leading trends -- 14.2.1.Microalgae biorefinery for food, feed, fertilizer and energy production -- 14.2.2.Biofuel production from low-cost microalgae grown in wastewater -- 14.2.3.Biogas upgrading with microalgae production for production of electricity -- 14.2.4.Hydrocarbon milking of modified Botryococcus microalgae strains -- 14.2.5.Hydrogen production combining direct and indirect microalgae biophotolysis -- 14.2.6.Direct ethanol production from autotrophic cyanobacteria -- 14.3.Production platforms -- 14.3.1.Ocean -- 14.3.2.Lakes -- 14.3.3.Raceways -- 14.3.4.Photobioreactors -- 14.3.5.Fermenters -- 14.4.Conclusions -- References -- 15.Microalgal production systems: Global impact of industry scale-up / Ben Hankamer -- 15.1.Microalgal biotechnology -- 15.2.Global challenges, production and demand -- 15.2.1.Global fuel production and demand -- 15.2.2.Global food production and demand -- 15.2.3.Solar irradiance and areal requirement -- 15.2.4.Global challenges -- 15.3.Potential production and limitations -- 15.3.1.Solar energy and geographic location -- 15.3.2.Potential productivity -- 15.3.3.Land resources -- 15.3.4.Carbon management and associated costs -- 15.3.4.1.CO2 requirements -- 15.3.4.2.CO2 utilization and sequestration -- 15.3.4.3.CO2 delivery -- 15.3.5.Nutrient management and associated costs -- 15.3.5.1.Phosphorus -- 15.3.5.2.Nitrogen -- 15.3.5.3.Nutrient recycling -- 15.3.6.Water management and associated costs -- 15.4.Global impact of scale-up -- 15.4.1.Addressing world production -- 15.4.2.Economics of large-scale microalgal production systems -- 15.4.3.Techno-economic analysis of microalgal production systems -- 15.4.3.1.Cultivation systems -- 15.4.3.2.Impact of capital costs -- 15.4.3.3.Downstream processing -- 15.4.3.4.Harvesting and dewatering -- 15.4.4.Dedicated versus integrated production models -- 15.4.5.Business models -- 15.4.6.Pathways to commercialization -- 15.5.Conclusion -- References."@en ;
   schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1184080567> ;
   schema:inLanguage "en" ;
   schema:name "Microalgal biotechnology : integration and economy"@en ;
   schema:numberOfPages "319" ;
   schema:productID "808316426" ;
   schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/808316426#PublicationEvent/berlin_boston_walter_de_gruyter_2012> ;
   schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1184080567#Agent/walter_de_gruyter> ; # Walter de Gruyter
   schema:url <http://www.degruyter.com/viewbooktoc/product/185619> ;
   schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9783110298277> ;
   wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/808316426> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://dbpedia.org/resource/Boston> # Boston
    a schema:Place ;
   schema:name "Boston" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1184080567#Agent/walter_de_gruyter> # Walter de Gruyter
    a bgn:Agent ;
   schema:name "Walter de Gruyter" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1184080567#Topic/microalgae_biotechnology_economic_aspects> # Microalgae--Biotechnology--Economic aspects
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:hasPart <http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2010002804> ; # Microalgae--Biotechnology
   schema:name "Microalgae--Biotechnology--Economic aspects"@en ;
    .

<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2010002804> # Microalgae--Biotechnology
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "Microalgae--Biotechnology"@en ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1751662> # Microalgae--Biotechnology
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:hasPart <http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2010002804> ; # Microalgae--Biotechnology
   schema:name "Microalgae--Biotechnology"@en ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/258937427> # Clemens Posten
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Posten" ;
   schema:givenName "Clemens" ;
   schema:name "Clemens Posten" ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/259233587> # Christian Walter
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:birthDate "1965 December 15" ;
   schema:familyName "Walter" ;
   schema:givenName "Christian" ;
   schema:name "Christian Walter" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9783110298277>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
   schema:isbn "3110298279" ;
   schema:isbn "9783110298277" ;
    .

<http://www.degruyter.com/viewbooktoc/product/185619>
   rdfs:comment "Available to Stanford-affiliated users." ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.