skip to content
Military schools and courses of instruction in the science and art of war, in France, Prussia, Austria, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, Sardinia, England, and the United States. Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Military schools and courses of instruction in the science and art of war, in France, Prussia, Austria, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, Sardinia, England, and the United States.

Author: Henry Barnard
Publisher: New York, Greenwood Press [1969]
Edition/Format:   Book : English : Rev. edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In this book, Asger Aaboe selects a few significant "episodes" from early astronomy and treats them in detail, rather than attempting a general survey. First he gives a descriptive account of what one should see when one looks at the sky with the naked eye, unbiased by received knowledge, and with curiosity and wit. He then turns to the arithmetical astronomy of ancient Mesopotamia, where astronomy first became an  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Barnard, Henry, 1811-1900.
Military schools and courses of instruction in the science and art of war.
New York, Greenwood Press [1969]
(OCoLC)567988992
Online version:
Barnard, Henry, 1811-1900.
Military schools and courses of instruction in the science and art of war.
New York, Greenwood Press [1969]
(OCoLC)606119144
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Henry Barnard
OCLC Number: 61919
Notes: Reprint of the 1872 rev. ed.
Description: 960 pages 23 cm
Responsibility: Drawn from recent official reports and documents.

Abstract:

"In this book, Asger Aaboe selects a few significant "episodes" from early astronomy and treats them in detail, rather than attempting a general survey. First he gives a descriptive account of what one should see when one looks at the sky with the naked eye, unbiased by received knowledge, and with curiosity and wit. He then turns to the arithmetical astronomy of ancient Mesopotamia, where astronomy first became an exact science. Next are treated Greek geometrical devices accounting for planetary motion, culminating in Ptolemy's planetary models in his Almagest. Ptolemy does not here assign his models absolute size, but if properly scaled, they yield good values, not only of the directions to the planets, but also of the distances to them. In fact, there is evidence that Copernicus used parameters from the Almagest to find the dimensions of his system. There follows a discussion of modifications of Ptolemy's models by Islamic astronomers, who wanted to use only uniform circular motion, some of which Copernicus adopted. Aaboe concludes this section by clarifying precisely which problem was resolved by the heliocentric hypothesis, as well as by Tycho Brahe's arrangement."--Jacket.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(1)

User lists with this item (2)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/61919>
library:oclcnum"61919"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/61919>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"Rev. ed."
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1969"
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1223963>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Military schools and courses of instruction in the science and art of war, in France, Prussia, Austria, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, Sardinia, England, and the United States."@en
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/61919>
schema:reviewBody""In this book, Asger Aaboe selects a few significant "episodes" from early astronomy and treats them in detail, rather than attempting a general survey. First he gives a descriptive account of what one should see when one looks at the sky with the naked eye, unbiased by received knowledge, and with curiosity and wit. He then turns to the arithmetical astronomy of ancient Mesopotamia, where astronomy first became an exact science. Next are treated Greek geometrical devices accounting for planetary motion, culminating in Ptolemy's planetary models in his Almagest. Ptolemy does not here assign his models absolute size, but if properly scaled, they yield good values, not only of the directions to the planets, but also of the distances to them. In fact, there is evidence that Copernicus used parameters from the Almagest to find the dimensions of his system. There follows a discussion of modifications of Ptolemy's models by Islamic astronomers, who wanted to use only uniform circular motion, some of which Copernicus adopted. Aaboe concludes this section by clarifying precisely which problem was resolved by the heliocentric hypothesis, as well as by Tycho Brahe's arrangement."--Jacket."
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.