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The mind's eye

Auteur : Oliver W Sacks
Éditeur : New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2010.
Édition/format :   Livre : Anglais : 1st edVoir toutes les éditions et les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
In this work the author tells the stories of people who are able to navigate the world and communicate with others despite losing what many of us consider indispensable senses and abilities: the power of speech, the capacity to recognize faces, the sense of three dimensional space, the ability to read, the sense of sight. For all of these people, the challenge is to adapt to a radically new way of being in the  Lire la suite...
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Détails

Genre/forme : Anecdotes
Popular works
Popular Works
Type d’ouvrage : Ressource Internet
Format : Livre, Ressource Internet
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Oliver W Sacks
ISBN : 9780307272089 0307272087
Numéro OCLC : 505417145
Notes : "A Borzoi book" -- T.p. verso.
Description : xii, 263 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Contenu : Sight reading --
Recalled to life --
A man of letters --
Face-blind --
Stereo Sue --
Persistence of vision: a journal --
The mind's eye.
Responsabilité : Oliver Sacks.
Plus d’informations :

Résumé :

In this work the author tells the stories of people who are able to navigate the world and communicate with others despite losing what many of us consider indispensable senses and abilities: the power of speech, the capacity to recognize faces, the sense of three dimensional space, the ability to read, the sense of sight. For all of these people, the challenge is to adapt to a radically new way of being in the world. There is Lilian, a concert pianist who becomes unable to read music and is eventually unable even to recognize everyday objects, and Sue, a neurobiologist who has never seen in three dimensions, until she suddenly acquires stereoscopic vision in her fifties. There is Pat, who reinvents herself as a loving grandmother and active member of her community, despite the fact that she has aphasia and cannot utter a sentence, and Howard, a prolific novelist who must find a way to continue his life as a writer even after a stroke destroys his ability to read. And there is the author himself, a doctor who tells the story of his own eye cancer and the bizarre and disconcerting effects of losing vision to one side. He explores some very strange paradoxes, people who can see perfectly well but cannot recognize their own children, and blind people who become hyper visual or who navigate by "tongue vision." He also considers more fundamental questions: How do we see? How do we think? How important is internal imagery, or vision, for that matter? Why is it that, although writing is only five thousand years old, humans have a universal, seemingly innate, potential for reading? This book is a testament to the complexity of vision and the brain and to the power of creativity and adaptation. And it provides a whole new perspective on the power of language and communication, as we try to imagine what it is to see with another person's eyes, or another person's mind.

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