přejít na obsah
The ministry of illusion : Nazi cinema and its afterlife Náhled dokumentu
ZavřítNáhled dokumentu
Probíhá kontrola...

The ministry of illusion : Nazi cinema and its afterlife

Autor Eric Rentschler
Vydavatel: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1996.
Vydání/formát:   Kniha : EnglishZobrazit všechny vydání a formáty
Databáze:WorldCat
Shrnutí:
German cinema of the Third Reich, even a half-century after Hitler's demise, still provokes extreme reactions. More than a thousand German feature films that premiered during the reign of National Socialism survive as mementoes of what many regard as film history's darkest hour. As Eric Rentschler argues, however, cinema in the Third Reich emanated from a Ministry of Illusion and not from a Ministry of Fear. Party  Přečíst více...
Hodnocení:

(ještě nehodnoceno) 0 zobrazit recenze - Buďte první.

Předmětová hesla:
Více podobných

 

Vyhledat exemplář v knihovně

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Vyhledávání knihoven, které vlastní tento dokument...

Detaily

Žánr/forma: History
Doplňující formát: Online version:
Rentschler, Eric.
Ministry of illusion.
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1996
(OCoLC)653038944
Typ dokumentu: Book
Všichni autoři/tvůrci: Eric Rentschler
ISBN: 067457639X 9780674576391 0674576403 9780674576407
OCLC číslo: 34355001
Poznámky: The Mazal Holocaust Collection.
Popis: xvi, 456 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Obsahy: Introduction : The power of illusions --
Part 1 : Fatal attractions --
A legend for modern times : "The blue light" (1932) --
Emotional engineering : "Hitler youth quex" (1933) --
Part 2 : Foreign affairs --
Home sweet Heimat : "The Prodigal Son" (1934) --
Hollywood made in Germany : "Lucky kids" (1936) --
Astray in the new world : "La Habanera" (1937) --
Part 3 : Specters and shadows --
The elective other : "Jew süss" (1940) --
The Führer's phantom : "Paracelsus" (1943) --
Self-reflexive self-destruction : "Münchhausen" (1943) --
Epilogue : The testament of Dr. Goebbels --
Appendix A : Films and events, 1933-1945 --
Appendix B : Directorial filmographies --
Appendix C : American film and videotape sources.
Odpovědnost: Eric Rentschler.

Anotace:

German cinema of the Third Reich, even a half-century after Hitler's demise, still provokes extreme reactions. More than a thousand German feature films that premiered during the reign of National Socialism survive as mementoes of what many regard as film history's darkest hour. As Eric Rentschler argues, however, cinema in the Third Reich emanated from a Ministry of Illusion and not from a Ministry of Fear. Party vehicles such as Hitler Youth Quex and anti-Semitic hate films such as Jew Suss may warrant the epithet "Nazi propaganda," but they amount to a mere fraction of the productions from this era. The vast majority of the epoch's films seemed to be "unpolitical"--Melodramas, biopics, and frothy entertainments set in cozy urbane surroundings, places where one rarely sees a swastika or hears a "Sieg Heil." Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels, Rentschler shows, endeavored to maximize film's seductive potential, to cloak party priorities in alluring cinematic shapes. Hitler and Goebbels were master showmen enamored of their media images, the Third Reich was a grand production. The Nazis were movie mad, and the Third Reich was movie made. Rentschler's analysis of the sophisticated media culture of this period demonstrates in an unprecedented way the potent and destructive powers of fascination and fantasy. Nazi feature films--both as entities that unreeled in moviehouses during the regime and as productions that continue to enjoy wide attention today--show that entertainment is often much more than innocent pleasure [Publisher description].

Recenze

Recenze vložené uživatelem
Nahrávání recenzí GoodReads...
Přebírání recenzí DOGO books...

Štítky

Buďte první.
Potvrdit tento požadavek

Tento dokument jste si již vyžádali. Prosím vyberte Ok pokud chcete přesto v žádance pokračovat.

Propojená data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/34355001>
library:oclcnum"34355001"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1996"
schema:description"Introduction : The power of illusions -- Part 1 : Fatal attractions -- A legend for modern times : "The blue light" (1932) -- Emotional engineering : "Hitler youth quex" (1933) -- Part 2 : Foreign affairs -- Home sweet Heimat : "The Prodigal Son" (1934) -- Hollywood made in Germany : "Lucky kids" (1936) -- Astray in the new world : "La Habanera" (1937) -- Part 3 : Specters and shadows -- The elective other : "Jew süss" (1940) -- The Führer's phantom : "Paracelsus" (1943) -- Self-reflexive self-destruction : "Münchhausen" (1943) -- Epilogue : The testament of Dr. Goebbels -- Appendix A : Films and events, 1933-1945 -- Appendix B : Directorial filmographies -- Appendix C : American film and videotape sources."@en
schema:description"German cinema of the Third Reich, even a half-century after Hitler's demise, still provokes extreme reactions. More than a thousand German feature films that premiered during the reign of National Socialism survive as mementoes of what many regard as film history's darkest hour. As Eric Rentschler argues, however, cinema in the Third Reich emanated from a Ministry of Illusion and not from a Ministry of Fear. Party vehicles such as Hitler Youth Quex and anti-Semitic hate films such as Jew Suss may warrant the epithet "Nazi propaganda," but they amount to a mere fraction of the productions from this era. The vast majority of the epoch's films seemed to be "unpolitical"--Melodramas, biopics, and frothy entertainments set in cozy urbane surroundings, places where one rarely sees a swastika or hears a "Sieg Heil." Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels, Rentschler shows, endeavored to maximize film's seductive potential, to cloak party priorities in alluring cinematic shapes. Hitler and Goebbels were master showmen enamored of their media images, the Third Reich was a grand production. The Nazis were movie mad, and the Third Reich was movie made. Rentschler's analysis of the sophisticated media culture of this period demonstrates in an unprecedented way the potent and destructive powers of fascination and fantasy. Nazi feature films--both as entities that unreeled in moviehouses during the regime and as productions that continue to enjoy wide attention today--show that entertainment is often much more than innocent pleasure [Publisher description]."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/796709419>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The ministry of illusion : Nazi cinema and its afterlife"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:workExample
schema:workExample
umbel:isLike<http://bnb.data.bl.uk/id/resource/GB9690480>
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Zavřít okno

Prosím přihlaste se do WorldCat 

Nemáte účet? Můžete si jednoduše vytvořit bezplatný účet.