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Mismatch : how affirmative action hurts students it's intended to help, and why universities won't admit it Preview this item
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Mismatch : how affirmative action hurts students it's intended to help, and why universities won't admit it

Author: Richard Henry Sander; Stuart Taylor
Publisher: New York, NY : Basic Books, a member of the Perseus Books Group, [2012]
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Argues that affirmative action actually harms minority students and that the movement started in the late 1960s is only a symbolic change that has become mired in posturing, concealment, and pork-barrel earmarks.
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Henry Sander; Stuart Taylor
ISBN: 9780465029969 0465029965
OCLC Number: 744287703
Description: xix, 348 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: I. Introduction. The idea of mismatch and why it matters ; A primer on affirmative action --
II. Stirrings of mismatch. The discovery of the mismatch effect ; Law school mismatch ; The debate on law school mismatch ; The breadth of mismatch --
III. The California experiment : what happens after a legal ban on racial preferences? Proposition 209 : the high road and the low road ; The warming effect ; Mismatch and the swelling ranks of graduates ; The hydra of preferences : the evasion of prop 209 at the University of California --
IV. Law and ideology. Why academics avoid honest debate about affirmative action ; Media, politics, and the accountability void ; The Supreme Court : rewarding opacity ; The George Mason affair ; Transparency and the California Bar affair --
V. The way forward. Class, race, and the targeting of preferences ; Closing the test score gap: better parenting and K-12 education ; Conclusion.
Responsibility: Richard Sander, Stuart Taylor, Jr.

Abstract:

Argues that affirmative action actually harms minority students and that the movement started in the late 1960s is only a symbolic change that has become mired in posturing, concealment, and pork-barrel earmarks.
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