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The modern voice in American poetry

Author: William Doreski
Publisher: Gainesville : University Press of Florida, ©1995.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Proposing that modern American poetry requires "limber criticism," informed but not straitjacketed by contemporary theory, William Doreski links the major American modernists to each other and to the larger social and cultural world. His concerns include voice, rhetoric, history, and interiority (imagination) and exteriority (landscape). Doreski examines the work of well-known poets - concentrating on Robert Frost,  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: William Doreski
ISBN: 0813013623 9780813013626
OCLC Number: 31783385
Description: xviii, 179 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Frost: lyric monologue and landscape --
Stevens: allegorical landscape and myth --
Williams and Moore: history and the colloquial style --
Eliot and Pound: political discourse and the voicing of difference --
Lowell: autobiography and vulnerability --
Epilogue: meditation and impersonality in contemporary poetry.
Responsibility: William Doreski.
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Abstract:

Proposing that modern American poetry requires "limber criticism", informed, but not straightjacketed, by contemporary theory, this work links the major American modernists to each other and to the  Read more...

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schema:description"Proposing that modern American poetry requires "limber criticism," informed but not straitjacketed by contemporary theory, William Doreski links the major American modernists to each other and to the larger social and cultural world. His concerns include voice, rhetoric, history, and interiority (imagination) and exteriority (landscape). Doreski examines the work of well-known poets - concentrating on Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, and Robert Lowell, but also including Alan Dugan, Robert Pinsky, John Ashbery, and Louise Gluck - from a fresh angle, often focusing on less-discussed poems (such as Eliot's "Portrait of a Lady"). Modernist poets experienced a vast shift in the relationship between poetry and society. Two principal themes underlie Doreski's criticism of their work: first, that they turned to drama, prose fiction, and extraliterary sources to expand the rhetorical range of their poetics; second, that their poetry demonstrates their conflict between a responsibility to history, tradition, or society and their desire to generate a world of their own making."@en
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