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Money, blood and revolution : how Darwin and the doctor of King Charles I could turn economics into a science

Author: George Cooper, (Investment advisor)
Publisher: Petersfield, Hampshire : Harriman House Ltd. 2014.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Economics is a broken science, living in a kind of Alice in Wonderland state believing in multiple, inconsistent, things at the same time. Prior to the financial crisis, mainstream economics argued simultaneously for small government on taxation, regulation and spending, but big government on monetary policy. After the financial crisis, economics is now arguing for more government spending and for less government  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: George Cooper, (Investment advisor)
ISBN: 9780857193827 0857193821
OCLC Number: 866937471
Description: xvii, 204 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: 1. Introduction: The Broken Science --
pt. I Science --
2. Scientific Revolutions --
3. A Crisis in the Heavens --
4. Blood and Bacon --
5. Darwin's Theory of Species --
6. Continents and Revolutions --
pt. II Economics --
7. Economics --
Ripe for Revolution --
8. Borrowing From Mr Darwin --
9. The Paradigm Shift --
10. Policy Implications.
Responsibility: George Cooper.

Abstract:

Economics is a broken science, living in a kind of Alice in Wonderland state believing in multiple, inconsistent, things at the same time. This book explains how the ideas of Darwin and Harvey could  Read more...

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