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Monster of God : the man-eating predator in the jungles of history and the mind

Author: David Quammen
Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton, ©2003.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Publisher's description: For millennia, lions, tigers, and their man-eating kin have kept our dark, scary forests dark and scary, and their predatory majesty has been the stuff of folklore. But by the year 2150 big predators may only exist on the other side of glass barriers and chain-link fences. Their gradual disappearance is changing the very nature of our existence. We no longer occupy an intermediate position  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David Quammen
ISBN: 0393051404 9780393051407
OCLC Number: 52041418
Description: 513 p. : maps ; 25 cm.
Contents: The food chain of power and glory --
Once there were lions --
The muskrat conundrum --
Leviathan with a hook --
Shadow of the nine-toed bear --
The teeth and the meat --
Perestroika --
Science fiction ending.
Responsibility: David Quammen.
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Abstract:

Publisher's description: For millennia, lions, tigers, and their man-eating kin have kept our dark, scary forests dark and scary, and their predatory majesty has been the stuff of folklore. But by the year 2150 big predators may only exist on the other side of glass barriers and chain-link fences. Their gradual disappearance is changing the very nature of our existence. We no longer occupy an intermediate position on the food chain; instead we survey it invulnerably from above--so far above that we are in danger of forgetting that we even belong to an ecosystem. Casting his expert eye over the rapidly diminishing areas of wilderness where predators still reign, the award-winning author of The Song of the Dodo examines the fate of lions in India's Gir forest, of saltwater crocodiles in northern Australia, of brown bears in the mountains of Romania, and of Siberian tigers in the Russian Far East. In the poignant and troublesome ferocity of these embattled creatures, we recognize something primeval deep within us, something in danger of vanishing forever.

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