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Monuments on the horizon : the formation of the barrow landscape throughout the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC

Author: Quentin Bourgeois
Publisher: Leiden Sidestone Press, 2013. ©2013
Dissertation: Ph.D. Universiteit Leiden 2013.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Material Type: Thesis/dissertation
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Quentin Bourgeois
ISBN: 9789088901041 908890104X
OCLC Number: 868959204
Language Note: Text in English with summary also in Dutch.
Description: xi, 239 pages : illustrations (some colour), maps ; 30 cm
Contents: Machine generated contents note: 1.Outlining the problem: barrows, barrow groups and barrow landscapes --
1.1.Introduction --
1.2.The European barrow phenomenon --
1.2.1.The concept of a barrow landscape --
1.3.What is so different about the barrow landscape? --
1.3.1.The barrow landscape as characteristic for the 3rd and 2nd Millennium BC --
1.3.2.Variability as key to the barrow landscape --
1.3.3.Understanding the variability: researching the formation of barrow landscapes --
1.4.Research questions --
1.5.Methodology and Research area --
1.6.The dataset --
1.7.The structure of the research --
2.Making sense of the barrow landscape --
2.1.Introduction --
2.2.The barrow as an exclusive and visible burial ritual --
2.3.Barrow-centric approaches: barrows as the resting place of individuals, the elite, warrior aristocracies and ancestors --
2.4.The scale of the barrow landscape: from individual barrows and barrow groups to barrow landscapes --
Contents note continued: 2.5.Why barrows are built in certain locations: barrows as the creation of lineal histories, genealogies, demarcating territories and ritual landscapes --
2.5.1.The visual nature of the barrow --
2.5.2.Barrows marking out ancestral presence --
2.5.3.Barrows as territorial markers --
2.5.4.Cosmological landscapes --
2.6.Problems with the previous approaches to the barrow landscape --
2.6.1.Barrows as claiming land --
2.6.2.The temporality of barrow landscapes: single logic and retrospective explanations --
2.7.Approaching the problem: reconstructing the development of the barrow landscape --
3.The chronology of barrow construction in the Low Countries --
3.1.Introduction --
3.2.Barrow chronologies, the creation of a chronological framework --
3.2.1.Existing typochronologies --
3.2.2.Problems with the previous typochronologies --
3.2.3.The need for a revision --
3.3.Barrow Jargon --
3.3.1.Primary barrows versus mound phases --
3.3.2.Surrounding features --
Contents note continued: 3.3.3.The distinction between primary and central graves --
3.3.4.Secondary graves --
3.3.5.Tangential graves --
3.4.A chronology of the barrow ritual --
3.4.1.Barrow construction --
3.4.2.Burial types --
3.5.A new chronology --
3.6.Concluding remarks --
4.Map formation processes and the dataset: assessing what is left of the barrow landscape --
4.1.Introduction --
4.2.Putting barrows into perspective: the representativity of the dataset --
4.3.Map formation processes --
4.3.1.Natural processes --
4.3.2.Anthropogenic processes --
4.3.3.Research factors --
4.4.Selecting and assessing the Research Areas --
4.5.Conclusion --
5.The development of the barrow landscape: case studies from the Low Countries --
5.1.Introduction --
5.2.The Epe-Niersen barrow alignment --
5.2.1.Introduction --
5.2.2.Geomorphology of the region --
5.2.3.Research history --
5.2.4.The representativity of the dataset --
5.2.5.The development of the Epe-Niersen barrow landscape --
Contents note continued: 5.2.6.Summary --
5.3.The Renkum stream valley --
5.3.1.Introduction --
5.3.2.Geomorphology of the region --
5.3.3.Research history --
5.3.4.Estimates of archaeological visibility --
5.3.5.The development of the Renkum barrow landscape --
5.3.6.Summary --
5.4.The Ermelo Barrow Landscape --
5.4.1.Introduction --
5.4.2.Geomorphology of the region --
5.4.3.Research history --
5.4.4.Estimates of archaeological visibility --
5.4.5.The development of the Ermelo Barrow Landscape --
5.4.6.Summary --
5.5.The Toterfout barrow group --
5.5.1.Introduction --
5.5.2.Geomorphology of the region --
5.5.3.Research history --
5.5.4.Estimates of archaeological visibility --
5.5.5.The development of the Toterfout barrow landscape --
5.5.6.Summary --
5.6.Conclusion --
6.The visual characteristics of a barrow --
6.1.Introduction --
6.2.The importance of visibility in Prehistory --
6.2.1.Monumental mounds --
6.2.2.Barrows as ritual platforms? --
Contents note continued: 6.3.Visibility studies within archaeology --
6.3.1.Phenomenology and barrow landscapes --
6.3.2.GIS and viewshed maps --
6.3.3.Temporality and visibility --
6.4.Visualising prehistoric landscapes --
6.4.1.Colourful mounds --
6.4.2.Post circles, ditches and palisaded ditches --
6.4.3.Vegetation reconstructions --
6.4.4.Combining the elements: an impression --
6.5.Researching visibility patterns --
6.5.1.The visibility analyses: some technical details and constraints --
6.5.2.Modelling vegetation within a GIS --
6.5.3.To see ... --
6.5.4.... or to be seen --
6.5.5.To see each other? --
6.5.6.Cresting the horizon --
6.5.7.Moving along the alignments --
6.6.Interpreting the results --
6.6.1.All barrows are equal... --
6.6.2.... but some are more equal than others --
6.6.3.Barrow landscapes and cosmological landscapes --
7.The reinterpretation of the barrow landscape --
7.1.Introduction --
7.2.The reinterpretation of past monuments --
Contents note continued: 7.3.Patterns of reuse in the Low Countries --
7.3.1.The restoration of ancient mounds --
7.3.2.Burial within ancient mounds --
7.4.Changing attitudes to barrows and barrow landscapes --
7.4.1.Corded Ware mounds --
7.4.2.Sporadic Bell Beaker reuse --
7.4.3.The Early Bronze Age gap? --
7.4.4.The Middle Bronze Age revival --
7.5.The reinterpretation of barrow landscapes --
7.5.1.The Bronze Age barrow as a resting place for multiple individuals --
7.5.2.Reuse was pre-ordained --
7.5.3.Reuse was totalizing --
7.5.4.Reuse was selective --
7.6.Conclusion --
8.The creation of a barrow landscape: constructing new mounds --
8.1.Introduction --
8.2.The frequency of barrow construction --
8.3.The episodic nature of barrow construction --
8.4.Heathland Barrows --
8.5.Barrow landscapes in the Low Countries --
8.5.1.Late Neolithic A --
8.5.2.Late Neolithic B --
8.5.3.The Early Bronze Age intermezzo --
8.5.4.Middle Bronze Age --
8.6.Understanding barrow landscapes --
Contents note continued: 8.6.1.Barrow Lines --
8.6.2.Dispersed barrow groups --
8.7.Conclusion --
9.The formation of the barrow landscape --
9.1.Introduction --
9.2.The time-depth of the barrow landscape and its implications --
9.3.The Barrow Choreography --
9.4.Idiosyncratic groups --
9.5.Barrow communities --
9.6.The creation of barrow communities --
9.6.1.Collective memory and the barrow landscape --
9.6.2.Non-discursive construction of community --
9.6.3.Semiotic and relational landscapes --
9.7.Conclusion.
Other Titles: Formation of the barrow landscape throughout the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC
Responsibility: door Quentin Philippe Jean Bourgeois.

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   schema:description "Contents note continued: 8.6.1.Barrow Lines -- 8.6.2.Dispersed barrow groups -- 8.7.Conclusion -- 9.The formation of the barrow landscape -- 9.1.Introduction -- 9.2.The time-depth of the barrow landscape and its implications -- 9.3.The Barrow Choreography -- 9.4.Idiosyncratic groups -- 9.5.Barrow communities -- 9.6.The creation of barrow communities -- 9.6.1.Collective memory and the barrow landscape -- 9.6.2.Non-discursive construction of community -- 9.6.3.Semiotic and relational landscapes -- 9.7.Conclusion."@en ;
   schema:description "Contents note continued: 2.5.Why barrows are built in certain locations: barrows as the creation of lineal histories, genealogies, demarcating territories and ritual landscapes -- 2.5.1.The visual nature of the barrow -- 2.5.2.Barrows marking out ancestral presence -- 2.5.3.Barrows as territorial markers -- 2.5.4.Cosmological landscapes -- 2.6.Problems with the previous approaches to the barrow landscape -- 2.6.1.Barrows as claiming land -- 2.6.2.The temporality of barrow landscapes: single logic and retrospective explanations -- 2.7.Approaching the problem: reconstructing the development of the barrow landscape -- 3.The chronology of barrow construction in the Low Countries -- 3.1.Introduction -- 3.2.Barrow chronologies, the creation of a chronological framework -- 3.2.1.Existing typochronologies -- 3.2.2.Problems with the previous typochronologies -- 3.2.3.The need for a revision -- 3.3.Barrow Jargon -- 3.3.1.Primary barrows versus mound phases -- 3.3.2.Surrounding features --"@en ;
   schema:description "Contents note continued: 7.3.Patterns of reuse in the Low Countries -- 7.3.1.The restoration of ancient mounds -- 7.3.2.Burial within ancient mounds -- 7.4.Changing attitudes to barrows and barrow landscapes -- 7.4.1.Corded Ware mounds -- 7.4.2.Sporadic Bell Beaker reuse -- 7.4.3.The Early Bronze Age gap? -- 7.4.4.The Middle Bronze Age revival -- 7.5.The reinterpretation of barrow landscapes -- 7.5.1.The Bronze Age barrow as a resting place for multiple individuals -- 7.5.2.Reuse was pre-ordained -- 7.5.3.Reuse was totalizing -- 7.5.4.Reuse was selective -- 7.6.Conclusion -- 8.The creation of a barrow landscape: constructing new mounds -- 8.1.Introduction -- 8.2.The frequency of barrow construction -- 8.3.The episodic nature of barrow construction -- 8.4.Heathland Barrows -- 8.5.Barrow landscapes in the Low Countries -- 8.5.1.Late Neolithic A -- 8.5.2.Late Neolithic B -- 8.5.3.The Early Bronze Age intermezzo -- 8.5.4.Middle Bronze Age -- 8.6.Understanding barrow landscapes --"@en ;
   schema:description "Contents note continued: 3.3.3.The distinction between primary and central graves -- 3.3.4.Secondary graves -- 3.3.5.Tangential graves -- 3.4.A chronology of the barrow ritual -- 3.4.1.Barrow construction -- 3.4.2.Burial types -- 3.5.A new chronology -- 3.6.Concluding remarks -- 4.Map formation processes and the dataset: assessing what is left of the barrow landscape -- 4.1.Introduction -- 4.2.Putting barrows into perspective: the representativity of the dataset -- 4.3.Map formation processes -- 4.3.1.Natural processes -- 4.3.2.Anthropogenic processes -- 4.3.3.Research factors -- 4.4.Selecting and assessing the Research Areas -- 4.5.Conclusion -- 5.The development of the barrow landscape: case studies from the Low Countries -- 5.1.Introduction -- 5.2.The Epe-Niersen barrow alignment -- 5.2.1.Introduction -- 5.2.2.Geomorphology of the region -- 5.2.3.Research history -- 5.2.4.The representativity of the dataset -- 5.2.5.The development of the Epe-Niersen barrow landscape --"@en ;
   schema:description "Contents note continued: 6.3.Visibility studies within archaeology -- 6.3.1.Phenomenology and barrow landscapes -- 6.3.2.GIS and viewshed maps -- 6.3.3.Temporality and visibility -- 6.4.Visualising prehistoric landscapes -- 6.4.1.Colourful mounds -- 6.4.2.Post circles, ditches and palisaded ditches -- 6.4.3.Vegetation reconstructions -- 6.4.4.Combining the elements: an impression -- 6.5.Researching visibility patterns -- 6.5.1.The visibility analyses: some technical details and constraints -- 6.5.2.Modelling vegetation within a GIS -- 6.5.3.To see ... -- 6.5.4.... or to be seen -- 6.5.5.To see each other? -- 6.5.6.Cresting the horizon -- 6.5.7.Moving along the alignments -- 6.6.Interpreting the results -- 6.6.1.All barrows are equal... -- 6.6.2.... but some are more equal than others -- 6.6.3.Barrow landscapes and cosmological landscapes -- 7.The reinterpretation of the barrow landscape -- 7.1.Introduction -- 7.2.The reinterpretation of past monuments --"@en ;
   schema:description "Contents note continued: 5.2.6.Summary -- 5.3.The Renkum stream valley -- 5.3.1.Introduction -- 5.3.2.Geomorphology of the region -- 5.3.3.Research history -- 5.3.4.Estimates of archaeological visibility -- 5.3.5.The development of the Renkum barrow landscape -- 5.3.6.Summary -- 5.4.The Ermelo Barrow Landscape -- 5.4.1.Introduction -- 5.4.2.Geomorphology of the region -- 5.4.3.Research history -- 5.4.4.Estimates of archaeological visibility -- 5.4.5.The development of the Ermelo Barrow Landscape -- 5.4.6.Summary -- 5.5.The Toterfout barrow group -- 5.5.1.Introduction -- 5.5.2.Geomorphology of the region -- 5.5.3.Research history -- 5.5.4.Estimates of archaeological visibility -- 5.5.5.The development of the Toterfout barrow landscape -- 5.5.6.Summary -- 5.6.Conclusion -- 6.The visual characteristics of a barrow -- 6.1.Introduction -- 6.2.The importance of visibility in Prehistory -- 6.2.1.Monumental mounds -- 6.2.2.Barrows as ritual platforms? --"@en ;
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