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The moon: considered as a planet, a world, and a satellite.

Author: James Nasmyth; James Carpenter
Publisher: London, J. Murray, 1874.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 2d edView all editions and formats
Summary:
Nasmyth's wonderfully evocative representations of the lunar surface are the most realistic ever produced by earthbound observers. James Nasmyth was not only the inventor of the steam hammer, that great symbol of victorian engineering, but was also an enthusiastic astronomer. He built a series of increasingly powerful telescopes and won a prize medal at the Great Exhibition for his drawings of the lunar surface (he  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Photographically illustrated books
Woodburytypes
Carbon prints
Engravings
Lithographs
Chromolithographs
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Nasmyth, James, 1808-1890.
Moon.
London, J. Murray, 1874
(OCoLC)903501844
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: James Nasmyth; James Carpenter
OCLC Number: 1478270
Description: xvi, 189 pages frontispiece, illustrations, 23 plates (including mounted photographs) 29 x 23 cm
Responsibility: By James Nasmyth, C.E. and James Carpenter, F.R.A.S ... With twenty-four illustrative plates of lunar objects, phenomena, and scenery; numerous woodcuts, &c.

Abstract:

Nasmyth's wonderfully evocative representations of the lunar surface are the most realistic ever produced by earthbound observers. James Nasmyth was not only the inventor of the steam hammer, that great symbol of victorian engineering, but was also an enthusiastic astronomer. He built a series of increasingly powerful telescopes and won a prize medal at the Great Exhibition for his drawings of the lunar surface (he had inherited a talent for drawing from his father, the painter Alexander Nasmyth.) He then made models of the lunar surface, based on his observations and drawings and the prints in this book are from photographs of these models taken in bright sunlight. Besides the plates the book is important for the discussion of the origins of the moon's physical geography.

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