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The moral and religious challenge of our times; the guiding principle in human development, reverence for personality,

Author: Henry Churchill King
Publisher: New York, Macmillan Co., 1911.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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King, Henry Churchill, 1858-1934.
Moral and religious challenge of our times.
New York, Macmillan Co., 1911
(OCoLC)619785905
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Henry Churchill King
OCLC Number: 1314780
Description: xviii pages, 1 leaf, 393 pages 20 cm
Contents: Ch I : Reverence for personality --
The meaning of the guiding principle ; I A fundamental moral principle ; II A basic Christian assumption ; III What the principle demands --
Ch II : The moral and religious challenge of present external conditions I : The new external conditions and their individual challenge ; I The main movements of the time ; 1 The progressive conquest over the forces of nature ; 2 The stupendous economic development ; 3 The world-wide economic solidarity ; 4 The enormous increase of wealth ; 5 The national conservation of natural resources ; 6 The inevitable growth of the cities ; 7 The far finer division of labor ; 8 The indefinitely closer connections of men the world over ; 9 The increasing association of the races ; 10 The extending application of scientific discoveries for the betterment of human life ; 11 The trend toward universal education ; 12 The movement for the advancement of women ; 13 The modern foreign missionary movement ; II Resulting changes among the nations ; 1 The rise of Japan ; 2 Turkey's marvelous peaceful revolution ; 3 Similar national changes in Russia, China, and Persia ; 4 The "rise of the native" ; 5 The increasing democratic trend ; 6 The socialistic and nihilistic movements ; 7 The commercial pressure on political and diplomatic action 8 The growing sense of responsibility on the part of the stronger nations 9 The greater influence of international criticism ; 10 The progress of international arbitration ; 11 The pressure of the far eastern question ; 12 The rising moral standards in the United States ; 13 A socialized individualism Ch III : The moral and religious challenge of present external conditions II : The comprehensive challenge of the new external conditions ; I Their meaning ; 1 Staggering resources of power and wealth ; 2 Increased comfort and ease of life ; 3 The possibility of greater leisure ; 4 More numerous and more complex relations ; 5 Forced interdependence and cooperation ; 6 Universal education and great ideal enterprises ; II The dangers and problems involved ; 1 The problem of the better distribution of wealth ; 2 The separation of work and happiness ; 3 The peril of the lower attainment ; 4 The "passion for material comfort" ; 5 The insane rush of our times ; 6 The sense of the complexity of life ; 7 The sense of the conflicting ideals of our time ; 8 Lack of the sense of law in the moral and spiritual world ; 9 The problem of race prejudices and antagonisms ; III The qualities demanded ; 1 Self-control, severely disciplined powers ; 2 Greater simplicity of life ; 3 The social virtues ; 4 Grappling with race prejudice ; 5 unselfish leadership ; IV ; The elements of encouragement ; 1 Recognition of the possibility of great achievements ; 2 The developing power of large tasks ; 3 The scientific study of human conditions ; 4 Forced cooperation ; 5 The possibility of greater leisure ; 6 The educational influence of the press ; 7 The trend toward universal education and great world enterprises Ch IV : The moral and religious challenge of the new inner world of thought I : The factors of the new inner world and their individual challenge ; I Natural science and evolution ; 1 The scientific method of control ; 2 The moral significance of the scientific spirit ; 3 The religious significance of the scientific spirit ; 4 Bringing a new sense of reality and of hope into the ideal realm ; 5 Bringing a new standard of efficiency into moral and religious education ; II The historical spirit ; 1 Its moral significance ; 2 Its religious significance III The new Psychology ; 1 Disclosing the laws of man's nature ; 2 Giving definite and concrete ideals ; 3 Particularly needed in the Orient ; 4 Inner health movement ; IV Sociology ; 1 A moral ideal involved ; 2 Giving laws of the permanent progress of the race ; 3 The elements of the social consciousness ; V Comparative religion ; 1 The moral qualities demanded ; 2 Giving an organic ideal of religious truth ; 3 The permanence of religion ; 4 Using the entire religious consciousness of the race VI The philosophical trend ; VII The theological trend Ch V : The moral and religious challenge of the new inner world of thought II : The comprehensive challenge of the factors of the new world of thought ; I The meaning of the new inner world ; 1 Makes the moral and religious life more sure and significant ; 2 The need of time and thought ; 3 Building upon freedom of conscience ; 4 Disclosing the great principles of human progress ; 5 Reverence for personality the essential guiding principle ; (1) Source of the other elements of the social consciousness ; (2) Seen in the historical trend ; (3) Christian, ethical, scientific, psychological ; II The dangers and problems involved ; 1 The danger of the false materialistic and atheistic inferences from modern science ; 2 The danger of a purely utilitarian point of view ; 3 The danger of withstanding all the newer knowledge ; 4 The sense of conflicting ideals ; 5 The peril of the lower attainment ; III The qualities demanded ; 1 Clear insight into the always difficult problems of a critical transition period ; 2 A breadth of view that is still sharply discriminating ; 3 The qualities of the social consciousness ; IV The elements of encouragement ; 1 A virtual moral and religious development ; 2 Definite direction given 3 Revelation of the inevitable spiritual qualities of men ; 4 The scientific spirit and the social consciousness ; V Educational applications ; 1 Inwardness of the moral and spiritual life ; 2 Certain educational demands ; 3 The eternal significance of life and the world --
Ch VI : The lesions of the historical trend of western civilization ; I The suggestions coming from the more important contrasts between ancient and modern civilization ; 1 The characteristic features of the ancient period 2 The outstanding features of the modern age ; 3 The moral-religious significance of the ancient exclusive state; (1) Closet possible ties ; (2) A definite moral-religious basis ; (3) Special effectiveness depended on freedom for individual initiative ; (4) Its great defects, exclusiveness and domination of individuals ; 4 The bringing in of Christianity ; (1) Brings in fundamental reverence for personality ; (2) So corrects defects of ancient exclusive state ; (3) Gives naturally the new conception of truth ; (4) Freedom of initiative supplemental to cooperation ; II The suggestions coming from well-recognized instances of mistaking, at first, the full meaning and proper application of the principles underlying western civilization ; 1 The early attempt to interpret Christianity in ascetic terms ; 2 The mediaeval conception of the absolute dominion of the Church ; 3 The Reformation principle of freedom of conscience ; 4 The position of the Manchester school ; III The suggestions coming from the relation of the fundamental principles and characteristics of present-day western civilization to moral and religious convictions ; 1 The new conception of truth and the new virtue of toleration ; 2 The native equality of all men ; 3 The wide extension of the franchise ; 4 The principles of western liberalism as a whole ; 5 The general enfranchisement of all forms of human activity ; 6 The immense interval between the ancient and modern world ; 7 The recent advances of western civilization 8 The trend not toward a soft and sentimental civilization ; 9 Why the forces of righteousness may be expected to prevail Ch VII : The meaning of the challenge in our own national life I : The new puritanism ; I The great positives of the puritan spirit ; 1 The vision of God and of the spiritual world ; 2 The conviction of divine commission ; 3 The feeling of responsibility and accountability ; 4 The sense of the significance and value of life ; II The reaction from Puritanism ; 1 Sentimentalism ; 2 A false tolerance ; (1) Ignoring the results of experience ; (2) Lack of discrimination ; (3) Lack of conviction ; (4) A narrow intellectualism ; 3 A false realism ; 4 A false estheticism ; III The new Puritanism, adding the great positives of the modern spirit ; 1 A genuine and reverent love ; 2 Perception of the breadth and complexity of life ; 3 Recognition of the unity of the life of man, giving the true place to self-denial ; (1) The self-denial needed for mental and moral hygiene ; (2) The self-denial demanded by the community life ; (3) Keeping relative goods in the relative place ; (4) The clear recognition of man's heroic mold Ch VIII : The meaning of the challenge in our own national life II : The guiding principle in race antagonisms ; I Self-respect ; 1 The Negro must respect himself ; 2 The White must keep his self-respect ; II Respect for the liberty of others ; 1 Northerner and Southerner must respect each other's liberties ; 2 The Whites must respect the liberty of the Blacks ; III Respect for the inner personality of others --
Ch IX : The meaning of the challenge in our own national life III : A truer democracy ; I A democratic policy in the conquest of natural forces ; II A democratic policy in the use of natural resources : III A democratic policy in the control of public utilities ; IV a democratic policy concerning the concentration of wealth and power ; V A democratic policy concerning social maladjustments ; 1 Our legal, legislative, and judicial tradition ; 2 The control of legislation by business interests ; 3 Economic abuses ; 4 Contrasts in the economic conditions of the rich and poor Ch X : The program of western civilization in its spread over the world : The guiding principle in international life ; I The interaction of the economic and religious ; 1 The two great forming agencies in the world's history, religious and economic ; 2 Western civilization has spread on these two lines ; 3 The economic and religious motives ; 4 The religious world movement must accompany the economic ; 5 How European civilization was set free for its world extension ; 6 Western civilization introduced into the Orient for commercial reasons and by force ; 7 The East faces either the adoption of western education or exploitation ; II How far the far East has taken on Western civilization ; III Completion of the world-wide extension of commerce and religion ; IV Why the Orient must go further ; V Why the West must be more Christian in its dealings with the East ; VI Transfer of spirit not forms of civilization ; VII Religious conviction needed in international relations.
Responsibility: by Henry Churchill King ...

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