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Moral science; or, The philosophy of obligation.

Author: James H Fairchild
Publisher: New York, Sheldon & Co. [©1892]
Edition/Format:   Book : English : Rev. edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: James H Fairchild
OCLC Number: 4862855
Notes: First published in 1869 under title: "Moral philosophy."
Description: 324 p. 20 cm.
Contents: PART 1.--THEORETICAL --
CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTORY DEFINITIONS. --
Divisions of the science --
Topics treated of --
Obligation a simple idea --
Undefinable --Attempted definitions --A moral being or person --Essential attributes --
Intellect --
Sensibility --
Free-will --
A moral act --
The moral element, where found --
Different forms of voluntary action --
More exact location of the moral element --
Character and intention --
Two kinds of moral action --
CHAPTER II. RIGHT OR VIRTUOUS ACTION --
The true good --
Absolute and relative good --
Illustrations of the two --
Mere animal life valuable --
The Summum Bonum --
No comparison of the two forms of good --
Happiness --
Obligation, how perceived --
Regard to our own good --
Of virtue as good --
Of benevolence as virtue --
Benevolence in consciousness --
CHAPTER III. WRONG OR SINFUL ACTION --
Its nature --
Its motive --
Its form, how determined --Gratification of desire not sin --
Sin subordinates reason --
No rational end in sin --
Sin not a choice of evil --
Sin not selfishness --Impossibility of making one's own good the supreme end --
Sin in consciousness --
Self-gratification not the intelligent end --
Sin subjection to impulse, or carnal-mindedness --
Desires and passions not sinful --
Their uses --
CHAPTER IV. OF THE PARTICULAR VIRTUES --
Benevolence the root --
Constitutes right character --
Its relation to the particular virtues, and to right acts --
Love --
Gratitude --
Justice not an independent --
virtue --
Mercy not opposed to justice --
Self-denial --Veracity --
Humility --
Faith --
Obedience --
The teaching of Scripture --
Misapprehensions of benevolence --
Interdependence of the virtues --
CHAPTER V. OF PARTICULAR VICES --
Their common element --
Their relation to sinful character --
Their origin --
Sensuality --
Ambition --
Avarice --
Pride and vanity --
Selfishness --
The desire not sinful --
Malevolent impulses --
Natural or impulsive goodness --
Two characters possible --
Apparent goodness --
Right moral judgments --
Kindly affections --
Devotional feelings --
Impulsive virtues, their relation to true virtue --
Imitative goodness --
Deficiency exhibited --
Are the impulsive virtues sinful? --
Their utility --
CHAPTER VI. ADDITIONAL REMARKS AND INFERRNCES --
Universality of the law of benevolence --
Works of supererogation impossible --
Morality personal, not transferable --
Ambiguity of the term character --
The seat of moral depravity --
Total moral depravity --
The moral change required --
Relation of emotion to the moral state --
Moral character in consciousness --
Moral consistency --
CHAPTER VII. RIGHT AND WRONG --
DUTY, KNOWN ANO UNKNOWN --
NEED OF A REvELATI0N --
Ambiguity of the terms right and wrong --
Absolute right and wrong --
Relative right and wrong --
Objective and subjective right and wrong --
Right and wrong per se --
The expedient and the right --
Our knowledge of the right --
End and means --
Doing evil that good may Come --
Least of two evils --
Known and unknown dUty --
Need of revelation to furnish motive and to indicate objective duty --
CHAPTER VIII. CONSCIENCE --
IS IT A GUIDE? --
Definition and office --
Impulse of Conscience --
Approval and condemnation --
Aesthetic conscience --
Conscience as a guide --
Intervention of judgment --
Different views --
Whately and Alexander --
Sins of ignorance --
Rational conscience the guide, not the emotional, nor the casthetic --
Conscientiousness --
Paul --
Honesty --
Sincerity --Conscience educated, enlightened, perverted --
Feeling of obligation --
CHAPTER IX. UNITY OR SIMPLICITY OF MORAL AcTI0N --
Virtue and sin contradictory --
Their coexistence impossible --
Different hypotheses to explain their coexistence --
Imperfect powers --
From the fall --From past sin --
Right intention with wrong thoughts and feelings --
Mixed motives --
Partial regard for good --
Lack of intensity --
Right ultimate choice and wrong acts --
The teaching of the Scriptores --
Practical teaching --
N. W. Taylor --
Objections and answers --
Prevailing consciousness --
Negative testimony --
No room for improvement --
Degrees of goodness --
Degrees of sinfulness --
Temptation and guilt --
Knowledge of past sinfulness --
General bearing of the doctrine --
CHAPTER X. THEORIES OF OBLIGATION --
The question --
Different answers --
Reason for the difference --
Socrates and Plato --
Aristotle --
Doctrine of the Stoics --
Of the Epicureans --
Modern views --
Paley --
Taylor --
Difficulties --
Psychological error --
No freedom --
Misrepresents benevolence --
Mistakes the motive --
Makes no difference between the good and the bad --
Does not accord with Scripture --
Utilitarianism --
Misapplication of the term --
Needed discrimination --
"Holy Happiness" --
Kind of happiness to be sought --
Spencer's "Ethics" --
CHAPTER XI. --
THEORIES OF OBLIGATION --
Of right as ultimate --
Of obligation as originating in the will of God --
Difficulties --
Reason not ultimate --
Obligation known intuitively --
No character in God --
Relativity of morality --
Unscriptural --
Founded in the reason or nature of God --
Of spiritual worthiness as ultimate --
Hickok's view --
Janet's --
Seelye's --
Personal perfection not the true aim the term good --
Ambiguous use --
Virtue as ultimate --
Complacency not virtue --
Virtue a quality of choice, not its object --
Of abstract right as ultimate --
Axiom of the theory --
Does not explain the virtues --
Gives no unity to virtue --
Rightness not the final motive --
Maxim of the theory --
Acting from principle --
Rightness not ultimate --
Incidental advantages of the theory of benevolence --
CHAPTER I. GOVERNMENT - ITS NATURE AND F0UNDATI0N --
Definitions --
Relation of sanctions to government --
Object of government --
Its right to exist --
The right to govern --
Duty to govern --
Designation of the ruler --
Form of government --
Extent of authority --
Not dependent on desire of the governed --
CHAPTER II. THE DIVINE GOVERNMENT --
Its constitution --
Why God assumes the government --
The divine law --
How known to men --
Revealed law --Authority of examples --
The Saviour's example --
Genuine virtue required --
Personality of the law --
Application to communities --
Dealing with nations --
National sins --
CHAPTER III. PENALTIES UNDER THE DIVINE GOVERNMENT --
Nature of penalty --
Effects of penalty --
Relation of penalty to desert --
True reason of penalty --
Its extent --
Discipline and penalty --
Necessity of penalty in the divine government --
Degree and duration --
Guilt everlasting --
Natural consequences not penalty --
Physical law and penalty --
Remorse and penalty --
Providential conse quence --
CHAPTER IV. CIVIL GOVERNMENT --
Its foundation --
Right to govern --
The form of government --
A legitimate government --
A tyranny --
Constitutions --
Not a social compact --
Right and duty of voting --
The ruler a servant --
Doctrine of instruction --
Right of the majority --
Principle of representation --
The will of the governed a controlling element --
General tendency to democracy --
Relation of law to righteousness --
Mistakes --
PART 11. PRACTICAL ETHICS --
PRELIMINARY REMARKS --
FIRST DIVISION --
CHAPTER V. PENALTIES IN CIVIL GOVERNMENT --
Uses of penalties --
Dangerous tendency --
Capital punishment --
Reasons for it --
Objection --
CHAPTER VI. LIMITS OF OBEDIENcE TO CIVIL GOVERNMENT --
GOvernment subordinate --
The higher law applied to a democratic state --
No general formula --
Laws, just, indifferent, unjust --
Two possible courses --
Duty of a subordinate magistrate --
Right of revolution --
Apprehended tendency --
Errors in two directions --
CHAPTER VII. THE RELATIONS OF NATIONS To EACH OTHER --
Obligation of nations limited --
Laws of nations --
Duty to respect each other's sovereignty --
Duty in case of rebellion --
In treaties --
In commercial intercourse --
Duty of self-preservation --
The rightfulness of war --
In case of resistance at home --
In case of aggression from without --
In defense of the weak --
In suppression of out rage --
In justifiable revolution --
Objections --
The true aim in war --
Duties in war --
CHAPTER VIII. FAMILV GOVERNMENT --
Has a natural foundation --
Limited in its subjects --
Wide in its application to interests --
Mode of constitution --
Question of headsbip --
A relation of confidence --
To be entered upon with deliberation --
Maintained with care --
A natural sphere for each --
Relations of the family to the state and to society --
CHAPTER IX. DUTIES OF PARENT AND CHILD --
OF TEACHER AND PUPIL --
Chief work of the family --
Place of parental affection --
Leading duty of the parent --
Duty of obedience and its natural termination --
Claim of the child --
Limit of obedience --
Duty in maturity toward dependent parents --
The teacher's authority --
Its extent --
Need of closer definition --
The pupil's duty --
Unnatural antagonism --
Mutual regard --
Unfavorable tendencies --
Extreme in dividualism --
Independence of opinion --
SECOND DIVISION - PERSONAL RIGHTS AND DUTIES --
CHAPTER I. GENERAL PRLNCIPLES --
BaSIS of rights --
The comprehensive right --
Inalienable rights --
Basis of duties --
Correlation of rights and duties --
Positive and negative precepts --
Subjects of rights and duties --
The rights of brutes --
Superior right of rational beings --
CHAPTER II. RIGHTS --
LIFE --
Basis of the right --
Guilt of murder --
Malice and hatred --
Manslaughter --
Related crimes --
Right of self-preservation limited --
Self-defense --
Protection of property --
Carrying weapons --
Dueling --
Objections to self-defense --
Euthanacia --
CHAPTER III. RIGHTS --
LIBERTY --
Definition and extent --
Basis of the right --
Misapprehension of its origin --
Application to different powers --Principle of toleration --
Freedom of the press --
Free discussion --
Intervention of government in worship and education --
Subjective limitations --
Respect to the consciences of others --
Use of definite rules --
Violations of liberty --
Its defense --
CHAPTER IV. RIGHTS --
REPUTATION --
The interest involved --
How a good --
The precept --
Temptations to its violation --
Duty of exposing wrong --
Slander in truth-telling --
CHAPTER V. RIGHTS --
PROPERTY --
Origin of the right --
The precqpt --
Property, how acquired --
Transferable --
Right of discovery --
Effect of long possession --
Things not to be appropriated --
Animals made property, human beings not --
Limitations of the right --
Law of exchange --
Duty of the vender --
Standard of value --
SECOND DIVISION - PERSONAL RIGHTS AND DUTIES --
Managing the market --
Cicero's example --
Law of wages Woman's wages --
Work that is above wages --
Violations of the right of property --
Bankrupt laws --
Prevalence of fraud upon the government --
Mischief of repudiation --
Immorality of gambling --Conflict of labor and capital --
CHAPTER VI. DUTIEs --
PIETY --
Origin of duties --
Nature of piety --
Its relation to religion --
Morality and religion --
Morality attained by religion --
Opposite of piety --
Duty of worship --
Possibility of prayer --
Speculative objections --
Social and public prayer --
The Sabbath --
Change of day --
Obligation permanent --
Proper observance --
Duty of promoting religion --
CHAPTER VII. Bums --
PHILANTHROPY --
PATRIoTIsM --Nature of philanthropy --Its relation to religion --
Its scope --
Proper test --
Misanthropy --
Patriotism as a virtue --
Required by benevolence --
Things opposed to patriotism --
CHAPTER VIII. DUTIES --
SELF-CULTURE --
Its nature and reasons --
Extends to all the faculties --
Spiritual culture --
Its relation to virtuous character --Intellectual culture --
Things to be held subordinate --
Kind of knowledge to be sought --
Culture of the sensibility --
Gives power --Relation to moral character --
Control indirect --
Associations --Books --
Perfection of character --
CHAPTER IX. DUTIES --
SELF-CULTURE --
Aesthetic --
Its expensiveness --
Elevating tendency --
Increases power --
False refinement --
Fastidiousness --
The cultivated lady --
Culture, how attained --
Degree of attention proper --
Other demands to be cousidered --
Physical culture a duty --
Health --
Manual skill --Manners and habits --
Predominance of the soul --
CHAPTER X. DuTIES --
USEFULNESS --
The true aim --
The natural impulse --
Proper occupation --
Notoriety not usefulness --
Wealth and its uses --
Special obligation of the rich --
Social influence --
Difficulties and duties --
Special duties of the young --
The great want --
CHAPTER XL. DUTIES --
FIDELITY --Faithfulness in contracts --
Binding force --
Threats and promises --
In what sense binding --
When null --
Conditions --
Express and implied contracts --
Effect of the oath --
Marriage engagements --
CHAPTER XII. DUTIES --
VERACITY --
ItS nature and obligation --
Significance of the oath --
Its rightfulness --
Profanity --
Violations of veracity --
Limits of the obligation --
Words and gestures --
Legal practice --
Instinct of veracity --
CHAPTER XIII. DUTIES --
CHASTITY --
Nature of the duty --
Effect and criminality of unchastity --
Injustice of society --
Marriage provided for --
Its nature and conditions --
Moral law of divorce --
Civil law --
Incest --
Concluding remarks.
Responsibility: By James H. Fairchild.

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schema:bookEdition"Rev. ed."
schema:copyrightYear"1892"
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schema:datePublished"1892"
schema:description"CHAPTER VI. ADDITIONAL REMARKS AND INFERRNCES -- Universality of the law of benevolence -- Works of supererogation impossible -- Morality personal, not transferable -- Ambiguity of the term character -- The seat of moral depravity -- Total moral depravity -- The moral change required -- Relation of emotion to the moral state -- Moral character in consciousness -- Moral consistency -- CHAPTER VII. RIGHT AND WRONG -- DUTY, KNOWN ANO UNKNOWN -- NEED OF A REvELATI0N -- Ambiguity of the terms right and wrong -- Absolute right and wrong -- Relative right and wrong -- Objective and subjective right and wrong -- Right and wrong per se -- The expedient and the right -- Our knowledge of the right -- End and means -- Doing evil that good may Come -- Least of two evils -- Known and unknown dUty -- Need of revelation to furnish motive and to indicate objective duty --"@en
schema:description"PART 11. PRACTICAL ETHICS -- PRELIMINARY REMARKS -- FIRST DIVISION -- CHAPTER V. PENALTIES IN CIVIL GOVERNMENT -- Uses of penalties -- Dangerous tendency -- Capital punishment -- Reasons for it -- Objection -- CHAPTER VI. LIMITS OF OBEDIENcE TO CIVIL GOVERNMENT -- GOvernment subordinate -- The higher law applied to a democratic state -- No general formula -- Laws, just, indifferent, unjust -- Two possible courses -- Duty of a subordinate magistrate -- Right of revolution -- Apprehended tendency -- Errors in two directions -- CHAPTER VII. THE RELATIONS OF NATIONS To EACH OTHER -- Obligation of nations limited -- Laws of nations -- Duty to respect each other's sovereignty -- Duty in case of rebellion -- In treaties -- In commercial intercourse -- Duty of self-preservation -- The rightfulness of war -- In case of resistance at home -- In case of aggression from without -- In defense of the weak -- In suppression of out rage -- In justifiable revolution -- Objections -- The true aim in war -- Duties in war --"@en
schema:description"CHAPTER VIII. FAMILV GOVERNMENT -- Has a natural foundation -- Limited in its subjects -- Wide in its application to interests -- Mode of constitution -- Question of headsbip -- A relation of confidence -- To be entered upon with deliberation -- Maintained with care -- A natural sphere for each -- Relations of the family to the state and to society -- CHAPTER IX. DUTIES OF PARENT AND CHILD -- OF TEACHER AND PUPIL -- Chief work of the family -- Place of parental affection -- Leading duty of the parent -- Duty of obedience and its natural termination -- Claim of the child -- Limit of obedience -- Duty in maturity toward dependent parents -- The teacher's authority -- Its extent -- Need of closer definition -- The pupil's duty -- Unnatural antagonism -- Mutual regard -- Unfavorable tendencies -- Extreme in dividualism -- Independence of opinion --"@en
schema:description"SECOND DIVISION - PERSONAL RIGHTS AND DUTIES -- Managing the market -- Cicero's example -- Law of wages Woman's wages -- Work that is above wages -- Violations of the right of property -- Bankrupt laws -- Prevalence of fraud upon the government -- Mischief of repudiation -- Immorality of gambling --Conflict of labor and capital -- CHAPTER VI. DUTIEs -- PIETY -- Origin of duties -- Nature of piety -- Its relation to religion -- Morality and religion -- Morality attained by religion -- Opposite of piety -- Duty of worship -- Possibility of prayer -- Speculative objections -- Social and public prayer -- The Sabbath -- Change of day -- Obligation permanent -- Proper observance -- Duty of promoting religion -- CHAPTER VII. Bums -- PHILANTHROPY -- PATRIoTIsM --Nature of philanthropy --Its relation to religion -- Its scope -- Proper test -- Misanthropy -- Patriotism as a virtue -- Required by benevolence -- Things opposed to patriotism -- CHAPTER VIII. DUTIES -- SELF-CULTURE -- Its nature and reasons -- Extends to all the faculties -- Spiritual culture -- Its relation to virtuous character --Intellectual culture -- Things to be held subordinate -- Kind of knowledge to be sought -- Culture of the sensibility -- Gives power --Relation to moral character -- Control indirect -- Associations --Books -- Perfection of character --"@en
schema:description"CHAPTER V. OF PARTICULAR VICES -- Their common element -- Their relation to sinful character -- Their origin -- Sensuality -- Ambition -- Avarice -- Pride and vanity -- Selfishness -- The desire not sinful -- Malevolent impulses -- Natural or impulsive goodness -- Two characters possible -- Apparent goodness -- Right moral judgments -- Kindly affections -- Devotional feelings -- Impulsive virtues, their relation to true virtue -- Imitative goodness -- Deficiency exhibited -- Are the impulsive virtues sinful? -- Their utility --"@en
schema:description"PART 1.--THEORETICAL -- CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTORY DEFINITIONS. -- Divisions of the science -- Topics treated of -- Obligation a simple idea -- Undefinable --Attempted definitions --A moral being or person --Essential attributes -- Intellect -- Sensibility -- Free-will -- A moral act -- The moral element, where found -- Different forms of voluntary action -- More exact location of the moral element -- Character and intention -- Two kinds of moral action -- CHAPTER II. RIGHT OR VIRTUOUS ACTION -- The true good -- Absolute and relative good -- Illustrations of the two -- Mere animal life valuable -- The Summum Bonum -- No comparison of the two forms of good -- Happiness -- Obligation, how perceived -- Regard to our own good -- Of virtue as good -- Of benevolence as virtue -- Benevolence in consciousness -- CHAPTER III. WRONG OR SINFUL ACTION -- Its nature -- Its motive -- Its form, how determined --Gratification of desire not sin -- Sin subordinates reason -- No rational end in sin -- Sin not a choice of evil -- Sin not selfishness --Impossibility of making one's own good the supreme end -- Sin in consciousness -- Self-gratification not the intelligent end -- Sin subjection to impulse, or carnal-mindedness -- Desires and passions not sinful -- Their uses -- CHAPTER IV. OF THE PARTICULAR VIRTUES -- Benevolence the root -- Constitutes right character -- Its relation to the particular virtues, and to right acts -- Love -- Gratitude -- Justice not an independent -- virtue -- Mercy not opposed to justice -- Self-denial --Veracity -- Humility -- Faith -- Obedience -- The teaching of Scripture -- Misapprehensions of benevolence -- Interdependence of the virtues --"@en
schema:description"CHAPTER VIII. CONSCIENCE -- IS IT A GUIDE? -- Definition and office -- Impulse of Conscience -- Approval and condemnation -- Aesthetic conscience -- Conscience as a guide -- Intervention of judgment -- Different views -- Whately and Alexander -- Sins of ignorance -- Rational conscience the guide, not the emotional, nor the casthetic -- Conscientiousness -- Paul -- Honesty -- Sincerity --Conscience educated, enlightened, perverted -- Feeling of obligation -- CHAPTER IX. UNITY OR SIMPLICITY OF MORAL AcTI0N -- Virtue and sin contradictory -- Their coexistence impossible -- Different hypotheses to explain their coexistence -- Imperfect powers -- From the fall --From past sin -- Right intention with wrong thoughts and feelings -- Mixed motives -- Partial regard for good -- Lack of intensity -- Right ultimate choice and wrong acts -- The teaching of the Scriptores -- Practical teaching -- N. W. Taylor -- Objections and answers -- Prevailing consciousness -- Negative testimony -- No room for improvement -- Degrees of goodness -- Degrees of sinfulness -- Temptation and guilt -- Knowledge of past sinfulness -- General bearing of the doctrine --"@en
schema:description"CHAPTER I. GOVERNMENT - ITS NATURE AND F0UNDATI0N -- Definitions -- Relation of sanctions to government -- Object of government -- Its right to exist -- The right to govern -- Duty to govern -- Designation of the ruler -- Form of government -- Extent of authority -- Not dependent on desire of the governed -- CHAPTER II. THE DIVINE GOVERNMENT -- Its constitution -- Why God assumes the government -- The divine law -- How known to men -- Revealed law --Authority of examples -- The Saviour's example -- Genuine virtue required -- Personality of the law -- Application to communities -- Dealing with nations -- National sins -- CHAPTER III. PENALTIES UNDER THE DIVINE GOVERNMENT -- Nature of penalty -- Effects of penalty -- Relation of penalty to desert -- True reason of penalty -- Its extent -- Discipline and penalty -- Necessity of penalty in the divine government -- Degree and duration -- Guilt everlasting -- Natural consequences not penalty -- Physical law and penalty -- Remorse and penalty -- Providential conse quence -- CHAPTER IV. CIVIL GOVERNMENT -- Its foundation -- Right to govern -- The form of government -- A legitimate government -- A tyranny -- Constitutions -- Not a social compact -- Right and duty of voting -- The ruler a servant -- Doctrine of instruction -- Right of the majority -- Principle of representation -- The will of the governed a controlling element -- General tendency to democracy -- Relation of law to righteousness -- Mistakes --"@en
schema:description"CHAPTER IX. DUTIES -- SELF-CULTURE -- Aesthetic -- Its expensiveness -- Elevating tendency -- Increases power -- False refinement -- Fastidiousness -- The cultivated lady -- Culture, how attained -- Degree of attention proper -- Other demands to be cousidered -- Physical culture a duty -- Health -- Manual skill --Manners and habits -- Predominance of the soul -- CHAPTER X. DuTIES -- USEFULNESS -- The true aim -- The natural impulse -- Proper occupation -- Notoriety not usefulness -- Wealth and its uses -- Special obligation of the rich -- Social influence -- Difficulties and duties -- Special duties of the young -- The great want -- CHAPTER XL. DUTIES -- FIDELITY --Faithfulness in contracts -- Binding force -- Threats and promises -- In what sense binding -- When null -- Conditions -- Express and implied contracts -- Effect of the oath -- Marriage engagements -- CHAPTER XII. DUTIES -- VERACITY -- ItS nature and obligation -- Significance of the oath -- Its rightfulness -- Profanity -- Violations of veracity -- Limits of the obligation -- Words and gestures -- Legal practice -- Instinct of veracity -- CHAPTER XIII. DUTIES -- CHASTITY -- Nature of the duty -- Effect and criminality of unchastity -- Injustice of society -- Marriage provided for -- Its nature and conditions -- Moral law of divorce -- Civil law -- Incest -- Concluding remarks."@en
schema:description"CHAPTER III. RIGHTS -- LIBERTY -- Definition and extent -- Basis of the right -- Misapprehension of its origin -- Application to different powers --Principle of toleration -- Freedom of the press -- Free discussion -- Intervention of government in worship and education -- Subjective limitations -- Respect to the consciences of others -- Use of definite rules -- Violations of liberty -- Its defense -- CHAPTER IV. RIGHTS -- REPUTATION -- The interest involved -- How a good -- The precept -- Temptations to its violation -- Duty of exposing wrong -- Slander in truth-telling -- CHAPTER V. RIGHTS -- PROPERTY -- Origin of the right -- The precqpt -- Property, how acquired -- Transferable -- Right of discovery -- Effect of long possession -- Things not to be appropriated -- Animals made property, human beings not -- Limitations of the right -- Law of exchange -- Duty of the vender -- Standard of value --"@en
schema:description"CHAPTER X. THEORIES OF OBLIGATION -- The question -- Different answers -- Reason for the difference -- Socrates and Plato -- Aristotle -- Doctrine of the Stoics -- Of the Epicureans -- Modern views -- Paley -- Taylor -- Difficulties -- Psychological error -- No freedom -- Misrepresents benevolence -- Mistakes the motive -- Makes no difference between the good and the bad -- Does not accord with Scripture -- Utilitarianism -- Misapplication of the term -- Needed discrimination -- "Holy Happiness" -- Kind of happiness to be sought -- Spencer's "Ethics" --"@en
schema:description"CHAPTER XI. -- THEORIES OF OBLIGATION -- Of right as ultimate -- Of obligation as originating in the will of God -- Difficulties -- Reason not ultimate -- Obligation known intuitively -- No character in God -- Relativity of morality -- Unscriptural -- Founded in the reason or nature of God -- Of spiritual worthiness as ultimate -- Hickok's view -- Janet's -- Seelye's -- Personal perfection not the true aim the term good -- Ambiguous use -- Virtue as ultimate -- Complacency not virtue -- Virtue a quality of choice, not its object -- Of abstract right as ultimate -- Axiom of the theory -- Does not explain the virtues -- Gives no unity to virtue -- Rightness not the final motive -- Maxim of the theory -- Acting from principle -- Rightness not ultimate -- Incidental advantages of the theory of benevolence --"@en
schema:description"SECOND DIVISION - PERSONAL RIGHTS AND DUTIES -- CHAPTER I. GENERAL PRLNCIPLES -- BaSIS of rights -- The comprehensive right -- Inalienable rights -- Basis of duties -- Correlation of rights and duties -- Positive and negative precepts -- Subjects of rights and duties -- The rights of brutes -- Superior right of rational beings -- CHAPTER II. RIGHTS -- LIFE -- Basis of the right -- Guilt of murder -- Malice and hatred -- Manslaughter -- Related crimes -- Right of self-preservation limited -- Self-defense -- Protection of property -- Carrying weapons -- Dueling -- Objections to self-defense -- Euthanacia --"@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/2313749>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Moral science; or, The philosophy of obligation."@en
schema:numberOfPages"324"
schema:publisher
schema:url

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