skip to content
Muslims in America : a short history Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Muslims in America : a short history

Author: Edward E Curtis
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.
Series: Religion in American life.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Muslims are neither new nor foreign to the United States. They have been a vital presence in North America since the 16th century. This book unearths their history, documenting the lives of African, Middle Eastern, South Asian, European, black, white, Hispanic and other Americans who have been followers of Islam. The book begins with the tale of Job Ben Solomon, a 18th century African American Muslim slave, and  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Edward E Curtis
ISBN: 9780195367560 0195367561
OCLC Number: 268957395
Description: xiv, 144 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 21 cm.
Contents: Across the black Atlantic : the first Muslims in North America --
The first American converts to Islam --
Twentieth-century Muslim immigrants : from the melting pot to the Cold War --
Religious awakenings of the late twentieth century --
Muslim Americans after 9/11.
Series Title: Religion in American life.
Responsibility: Edward E. Curtis IV.
More information:

Abstract:

Muslims are neither new nor foreign to the United States. They have been a vital presence in North America since the 16th century. This book unearths their history, documenting the lives of African, Middle Eastern, South Asian, European, black, white, Hispanic and other Americans who have been followers of Islam. The book begins with the tale of Job Ben Solomon, a 18th century African American Muslim slave, and goes on to chart the stories of sodbusters in North Dakota, African American converts to Islam in the 1920s, Muslim barkeepers in Toledo, the post-1965 wave of professional immigrants from Asia and Africa, and Muslim Americans after 9/11. The book reveals the richness of Sunni, Shi'a, Sufi and other forms of Islamic theology, ethics, and rituals in the United States by illustrating the way Islamic faith has been imagined and practiced in the everyday lives of individuals. It recovers the place of Muslims in the larger American story, too. Showing how Muslim American men and women participated in each era of U.S. history, the book explores how they have both shaped and have been shaped by larger historical trends such as the abolition movement, Gilded Age immigration, the Great Migration of African Americans, urbanization, religious revivalism, the feminist movement, and the current war on terror. It also shows how, from the very beginning of American history, Muslim Americans have been at once a part of their local communities, their nation, and the worldwide community of Muslims. A first single author history of Muslims in America from colonial times to the present, this book fills a huge gap and provides invaluable background on one of the most poorly understood groups in the United States.

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

"[Curtis] has authored a fine and succinct history that spans centuries...Unmatched for its breadth of sources, this is also one of the few books in the field to cover both immigrant and indigenous Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/268957395>
library:oclcnum"268957395"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/268957395>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh85089086>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Muslims--United States--Social conditions."@en
schema:name"Muslims--United States--History."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2009"
schema:description"Muslims are neither new nor foreign to the United States. They have been a vital presence in North America since the 16th century. This book unearths their history, documenting the lives of African, Middle Eastern, South Asian, European, black, white, Hispanic and other Americans who have been followers of Islam. The book begins with the tale of Job Ben Solomon, a 18th century African American Muslim slave, and goes on to chart the stories of sodbusters in North Dakota, African American converts to Islam in the 1920s, Muslim barkeepers in Toledo, the post-1965 wave of professional immigrants from Asia and Africa, and Muslim Americans after 9/11. The book reveals the richness of Sunni, Shi'a, Sufi and other forms of Islamic theology, ethics, and rituals in the United States by illustrating the way Islamic faith has been imagined and practiced in the everyday lives of individuals. It recovers the place of Muslims in the larger American story, too. Showing how Muslim American men and women participated in each era of U.S. history, the book explores how they have both shaped and have been shaped by larger historical trends such as the abolition movement, Gilded Age immigration, the Great Migration of African Americans, urbanization, religious revivalism, the feminist movement, and the current war on terror. It also shows how, from the very beginning of American history, Muslim Americans have been at once a part of their local communities, their nation, and the worldwide community of Muslims. A first single author history of Muslims in America from colonial times to the present, this book fills a huge gap and provides invaluable background on one of the most poorly understood groups in the United States."@en
schema:description"Across the black Atlantic : the first Muslims in North America -- The first American converts to Islam -- Twentieth-century Muslim immigrants : from the melting pot to the Cold War -- Religious awakenings of the late twentieth century -- Muslim Americans after 9/11."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/803771126>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Muslims in America : a short history"@en
schema:numberOfPages"144"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.