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My ambivalent relationship with Captain Pratt

Author: Robert M Utley; Robert J Dalessandro; U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.
Publisher: Carlisle, PA : AHEC ; Metro Productions, 2007.
Series: Perspectives in military history.
Edition/Format:   DVD video : National government publication : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
General Richard Henry Pratt, best known as the founder and longtime superintendent of the influential Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania, profoundly shaped Indian education and federal Indian policy at the turn of the twentieth century. Pratt's long and active military career included eight years of service as an army field officer on the western frontier. During that time he participated in some of the signal  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Robert M Utley; Robert J Dalessandro; U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.
OCLC Number: 182721364
Notes: Title from disc label.
Lecture held 17 October 2007, in Ridgway Hall, Army Heritage and Education Center.
Performer(s): Speaker introduced by Col. Robert Dalessandro.
Description: 1 videodisc ( 60 min.) ; sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Series Title: Perspectives in military history.
Responsibility: Robert M. Utley.

Abstract:

General Richard Henry Pratt, best known as the founder and longtime superintendent of the influential Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania, profoundly shaped Indian education and federal Indian policy at the turn of the twentieth century. Pratt's long and active military career included eight years of service as an army field officer on the western frontier. During that time he participated in some of the signal conflicts with Indians of the southern plains, including the Washita campaign of 1868-1869 and the Red River War of 1874-1875. He then served as jailor for many of the Indians who surrendered. His experiences led him to dedicate himself to Indian education, and from 1879 to 1904, still on active military duty, he directed the Carlisle school, believing that the only way to save Indians from extinction was to remove Indian youth to nonreservation settings and there inculcate in them what he considered civilized ways. Robert M. Utley edited Pratt's memoirs, and they offer insight into and understanding of what are now highly controversial turn-of-the-century Indian education policies. This is a personal account of Utley's experience with Pratt over a long professional career. It leads from his first book, Last Days of the Sioux Nation (1963) through his work editing Pratt's memoirs and includes research over many years touching on Indian policy and Pratt's role in it. It features some contrasting personal interpretations of the man.

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Linked Data


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