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The mythology of the Aryan nations.

Author: George W Cox
Publisher: Port Washington, N.Y., Kennikat Press [1969]
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Cox, George W. (George William), 1827-1902.
Mythology of the Aryan nations.
Port Washington, N.Y., Kennikat Press [1969]
(OCoLC)807960118
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: George W Cox
ISBN: 0804600910 9780804600910
OCLC Number: 21227
Notes: Half-title: Aryan mythology.
Reprint of the 1870 ed.
Description: 2 volumes 23 cm
Contents: V.1 Book I. --
Chapter I. Popular theories on the origin and growth of mythology --
Method of inquiry --
The nature of the problem to be solved --
Condition of society in the Greek heroic age --
Character of 'Homeric' mythology --
Contrast between mythological and religious belief --
The lyric and tragic poets conscious of the contrast --
Historical significance of Greek mythology --
Conflicting views as to its origin --
Hypothesis of an original revelation --
Extent of original revelation --
Its alleged perversion by the Greeks, as shown in the attributes of their gods --
System of secondaries --
Inventive, as distinguished from traditive, deities --
Nature of the doctrines perverted in Greek mythology --
Attributes of Athene and Apollon --
Relations of will between Zeus and Athene --
Peculiar forms of Greek mythology --
Consequences involved in the perversion of an original revelation --
Comparison of the Homeric with the Vedic mythology --
Methods of determining the extent of primitive revelation --
Evidence of the book of Genesis --
Limits of this evidence --
Course of revelation in the Old Testament --
Necessity of accounting for the character of Greek mythology --
Conditions of the inquiry --
Allegorical interpretation of myths --
Lord Bacon's method --
Its consequences --
Unscientific character of such interpretations --
Chapter II. The revelation of mythology to language --
Origin of abstract words --
Expansive power of sensuous words --
Origin of language --
Immobility of savage races --
Historical results of the analysis of language --
Earliest conditions of thought --
Chapter III. The source of mythical speech --
The infancy of mankind --
Primary myths --
Secondary myths --
Polyonymy, as affecting the growth of mythology --
Use of abstract and concrete names --
Myths arising from the use of equivocal words --
Disintegration of myths --
Chapter IV. The development of myths --
Elasticity of mythical speech --
Results of mythical language --
Evidence of this development furnished by the Rig-Veda --
Relative age of Greek myths --
Solar myths --
Changeful action of the sun --
Repulsive developments of solar legends --
Origin of these developments --
Tendency to localize mythical incidents --
Vitality of the mythopoeic faculty --
Constant demand for new mythical narratives --
Groundwork of the mythology of Northern Europe --
Groundwork of the 'Homeric' mythology --
Comparison of Greek and Norse mythology --
Special characteristics of Greek mythology --
Full development of Greek mythology --
Arrested growth of Northern mythology --
Light thrown on both by the Vedic hymns --
Stages in the growth of mythical systems V.1 cont. Chapter V. Greek conceptions of mythical tradition --
Gradual conceptions of mythical tradition --
Gradual assignment of an historical character to mythical beings --
Each clan or tribe regarded its own traditions as distinct from any other --
This belief wholly without foundation --
Connection between the legends of Argos, Thebes, and Athens --
The imagery of these legends --
Significance of the names employed in Greek legends --
Opinions of Greek Writers, and their value --
Chapter VI. Greek notions respecting the moral aspect of mythology --
Coarse development of certain mythical phrases --
Protests of Greek writers --
Limits of their knowledge --
Explanations of the seeming immorality of Aryan mythology --
The morality of the Hesiodic poems --
Chapter VII. Theory of Greek mythology as an eclectic system --
Reproduction of the same myth under different forms --
No historical conclusions to be drawn from the complications so caused --
Conclusions drawn from a comparison of Greek with Teutonic legends --
Theory of Dr. Döllinger on the origin of Greek mythology --
This theory stats on an assumption for which there is no evidence --
Historical speculations of Dr. Döllinger --
They leave the real difficulties of Greek mythology unexplained --
Chapter VIII. The diffusion of myths --
The common element in Aryan mythology --
The Greek mythology of itself explains this common element --
The Teutonic mythology points in precisely the same direction --
The mission link supplied in the older Vedic poems --
The key to all Aryan mythology --
Germs of mythical tales --
Groundwork of Aryan mythology --
Greek dynastic legends --
Growth of popular traditions --
Legends not resolvable into phrases relating to physical phenomena --
The Brahman and the goat --
The master thief --
The legend of Rhampsinitos --
The story of the poor mason --
The story of Karpara and Gata --
The story of Trophonios and Agamedes --
The shifty lad --
Point and drift of these stories --
The Hellenic master thief --
The origin of the story --
Limits to the hypothesis of conscious borrowing --
Framework of popular stories --
The dog and the sparrow --
The Nautch girl and the parrot --
Origin and growth of these stories --
The stories of Vicram and Hermotimos --
The table, the ass, and the stick --
The Brahman, the jackal, and the barber --
The lad who went to the North wind --
The story of Punchkin --
The giant who had no heart in his body --
Mythical repetitions and combinations --
Agency of beasts in these stories --
The two brothers --
Influence of written literature on folk-lore --
The stories of king Putraka and the three princesses of Whiteland --
Faithful John --
Rama and Luxman --
Mythical imagery of these stories --
The pilgrim of love --
The spell of mid-day --
The sleep or death of summer --
Origin of all myths relating to the charmed sleep of beautiful maidens --
Charms and spells in the Odyssey and in Hindu stories --
The snake leaves --
Myths of the night, the moon, and the stars --
The battle of light and darkness --
Character of Aryan folklore --
Historical value of Aryan popular traditions --
Chapter IX. Modern euemerism --
The method of Euemeros --
Its antagonism with the science of language --
The science of language in its bearing on history --
The Wolfian theory --
The real question at issue --
Residuum of historical fact in the Iliad --
The test of Homeric credibility --
Laws of evidence --
Their application in English courts of justice --
Application to Homeric history --
Value of the historical residuum in the Iliad --
Difficulties involved in the traditional view --
Euemeristic methods of dealing with the Homeric narratives --
Their irreconcilable results --
Value of traditional impressions --
The legend of Roland and the Nibelungenlied --
Principles of evidence --
The Homeric controversy --
The return of the Herekleids --
The Herekleid conquests not historical --
The origin of the traditions of the Herakleid conquests --
Materials of epical tradition --
Materials of the poems commonly called Homeric --
Attempted distinction between the sciences of language and mythology --
Assumed early popularity of our Iliad and Odyssey --
The evidence of the case --
The Homer of the Greek tragic poets --
Results of the inquiry V. 1 cont. Chapter X. The character of Greek dynastic and popular legends in relation to tribal and national names --
Fertility of mythical phrases --
Legends of rival Greek cities --
The Argive story --
The Theban story --
The Megarian story --
The Athenian story --
The story of the Pelopids --
Connection of these stories with the tribal or national names --
The Athenians --
Ionians and Phenicians --
Argives and Arkadians --
Delians and Lykians --
Ethiopians --
Danaans and Achaians --
Hellenes and Aiolians --
Greeks and Hesperians --
Italian and Teutonic tribal names --
Ethnological inferences --
Chapter XI. Mythical phrases furnishing the materials of the Homeric poems --
Extent of the old Homeric literature --
Extent of Homeric mythology --
The tale of the Achilleis --
The close of the Achilleis --
The whole Achilleis a solar epic --
The Trojan war only one scene of a long drama --
The Ilias as contrasted with the Achilleis --
Groundwork of the Odyssey --
How much of the Iliad or the Odyssey belongs to the invention of the poet --
The portraits of the greater chieftains and heroes not true to national character --
The character of Odysseus --
How far was the character of Odysseus a creation of the Homeric poet --
The character of Odysseus not Achaian --
Chapter XII. Mythical phrases furnishing materials for the teutonic epic poems, and the legends of Arthur and Roland --
Points of likeness between the Greek and Teutonic epics --
The Volsung tale --
The story of Sigurd --
The story of Gudrun --
Helgi sagas --
The first Helgi --
The second Helgi --
The third Helgi --
Sigurd, Siegfried, and Baldur --
The story of Hagen --
The vengeance of Kriemhild --
Historical element in the Nibelungenlied --
The story of Walthar of Aquitaine --
Dietrich of Bern --
The great Rose garden --
The romance of Roland --
The story of king Arthur --
The round table and the San Greal --
Arthur's knights --
Lancelot and Guinevere --
The death of Arthur --
Guinevere and Diarmaid --
Later mediaeval epics and romances --
Saga literature of Europe --
The Grettir saga --
The character of Grettir --
Materials of the saga --
Grettir and boots --
Parallelisms between the Grettir saga and other myths --
The avenging of Grettir V.1 cont Book II. --
Chapter I. The ethereal heavens --
Section I. Dyaus --
Ideas of heaven --
The glistening ether --
Dyaus and Prithivi --
Ideas denoted by the name Dyu --
Section II. Varuna and Mitra --
The solid heaven --
Moral aspects of Varuna --
Aryan monotheism --
Aditi and the Adityas --
The physical and spiritual Varuna --
Section III. Indra --
The primary conception of Indra purely physical --
Action of the Vedic and Achaian deities --
Indra a god of the bright heaven --
Meaning of the name --
The might and majesty of Indra --
Indra the rain-bringer --
Physical conflict between light and darkness --
The wife of Indra --
Section IV. Brahma --
Place of Brahma in the Hindu theogony --
Prajapati --
Visvakarman --
Section V. Zeus --
The dwelling of Zeus in ether --
The unchanging light --
The idea of Zeus suggested by physical phenomena --
The Latin Jupiter --
Zeus ouranion --
The mythical and spiritual Zeus --
The Zeus of the tragic poets --
The name Zeus, and its transformations --
The Zeus of local traditions --
The birth of Zeus --
The iniquities of Kronos --
The war of the Titans --
Other forms of this struggle --
The loves of Zeus --
The twelve Olympian deities --
The Cretan and Arkadian Zeus --
Lykosoura and Lykaon --
The Dodanaian and Olympian Zeus --
Limits to the power of Zeus --
The messengers of Zeus --
Zeus the judge --
Section VI. Odin, Woden, Wuotan --
Characteristics of Teutonic mythology --
Teutonic theogonies --
Genealogy of Odin --
Odin as the creator of man --
The end of the Asas or Aesir --
The name Wuotan --
The one-eyed Wuotan --
Odin the rain-giver --
Odin the all-father --
Tyr and Odin --
Section VII. Thunder, Donar, Thor --
The name Donar --
Thor the all-father --
His triple functions --
Section VIII. Fro --
Relations of Fro to Freya --
Section IX. Heimdall, Bragi, and Oegir --
The lard of Himinbiorg --
Bragi, the lord of day --
Oegir the sea-god --
Chapter II. The light --
Section I. Surya and Savitar --
Surya, the pervading irresistible luminary --
The one-handed Savitar --
The power of Savitar --
Section II. Soma --
The physical and spiritual Soma --
Powers of Soma --
Section III. Correlative deities --
Complementary deities --
The dualism of nature --
Functions of the Asvins --
Parentage of the Asvins --
The twins --
Soma and Surya --
Section IV. The dawn --
The lonely wanderer --
Development of the myth --
The story of Urvasi --
Germs of the story of Penelope --
The dawn and the waters --
Eros and Phsyche --
The search of the dawn for the sun --
The search of the sun for the dawn --
Origin of these myths --
East of the sun and west of the moon --
The wanderers in the forest --
The spell of moonlight --
The seven Rishis --
The Arkshas or Shiners --
The Rishis and Manu --
Section V. Dawn goddesses --
Ushas and Eos --
Ushas the broad-spreading --
Ahana --
Sarama --
The cows o Indra --
The Fidelity of Sarama --
Saranyu --
Erinys --
The Harpies --
Arjuni --
The horses of the sun --
Arushi --
Snakes and dragons --
Sorcery and witchcraft --
The story of Medeia --
The myth of Prokris --
Eos and Tithonos --
Hebe and Ganymeda --
The story of Dido and Anna --
Hero and Leiandros --
The brides of the sun --
The Arkadian Auge --
Europe and the bull --
Althaia and the burning brand --
Section VI. Athene --
The original idea of Athene purely physical --
Athene Tritogeneia --
Birth and parentage of Athene --
Athene mother of Phoibos and Lychnos --
Epithets of Athene --
Athene the guardian of heroes --
The Latin Minerva. V. 2 Chapter II: The light --
Section VII: Aphrodite --
Birth of Aphrodite --
The ministers of Aphrodite --
The arrows of Aphrodite --
Her children --
Her share in the Trojan War --
Aphrodite and Adonis --
The armed Aphrodite --
The Latin Venus --
Adonis and Dionysos --
Section VIII: Here --
Myths relating to the birth of Here --
Relations of Zeus and Here --
Here and Ixion --
Here Akraia --
Here the Matron --
The Latin Juno --
Section IX: The Erinyes --
Doctrine of necessity --
The conflict between light and darkness --
Erinyes and Eumenides --
The fatal sisters --
The Teutonic Norns --
Nemesis and Adrasteia --
Tyche Akraia --
Section X: Hellenic sun-gods and heroes --
The Ionian legend of the brith of Phoibos --
The Delphian story --
The infant Phoibos --
Phoibos Delphinios --
The fish-sun --
Phoibos and Hermes --
Phoibos and Helios --
Phoibos and Daphne --
Alpheios and Arethousa --
Endymion --
The story of Narkissos --
Iamos and Asklepios --
Ixion and Atlas --
The garden of the Hesperides --
Hyperion --
Helios and Phaethon --
Patroklos and Telemachos --
The bondage of Phoibos and Herakles --
Character of Herakles --
Herakles and Eurystheus --
The lions of Kithairon and Nemea --
Herakles and Kerberos --
The madness of Herakles --
Orthros and Hydra --
The Marathonian and the Cretan bulls --
The girdle of Hippolyte --
Myths interspersed among the legends of the twelve labours of Herakles --
Herakles and Eurytos --
Herakles and Auge --
Herakles and Deianeira --
The death of Herakles --
The Latin Herakles --
Egyptian myths --
Repetitions of the myth of Herakles --
The story of Perseus --
Birth and youth of Theseus --
The six exploits of his first journey --
Theseus at Athens --
Theseus and the Minotauros --
Theseus and the Amazons --
Theseus in the underworld --
Hipponoos Bellerphontes --
The brith of Oidipous --
The career of Oidipous --
The blinded Oidipous --
Oidipous and Antigone --
The story of Telephos --
Twofold aspect of the Trojan Paris --
The birth and infancy of Paris --
The judgement of Paris --
Paris and Helen --
Iamos --
Pelias and Neleus --
Romulus and Remus --
Cyrus and Astayges --
Chandragupta --
Kadmos and Europe --
Minos and the Minotaur --
Rhadamanthys and Aiakos --
Nestor and Sarpedon --
Memnon the Etheopian --
Kephalos and Eos --
Section XI: Teutonic sun-gods and heroes --
Baldur and Brond --
The dream of Baldur --
The death of Baldur --
The avenging of Baldur --
The story of tell and Gelser --
The myth wholly without historical foundation --
Utter impossibility of the Swiss story --
Other versions of the myth of Tell --
Tell the far-shooting Apollon --
Section XII: The vivifying sun --
Flexible character of Vishnu --
Vishnu the striding God --
Dwarf incarnation --
The palace of Vishnu --
Avatars of Vishnu --
Emblems associated with the worship of Vishnu --
Sensuous stage of language --
Aryan and semitic monotheism --
Ideas and symbols of the vivifying power in nature --
Rods and pillars --
Tree and serpent worship --
Sacrifices connected with this worship --
Symbols of wealth --
The Lotos --
Goblets and horns --
Gradual refinement of the myth --
Aryan and Semitic mysteries --
Real meaning of tree and serpent worship --
Section XIII. The Sun Gods of Later Hindu mythology --
Vishnu and Krishna --
Parentage of Krishna --
Krishna and Rudra --
Vishnu and Rama --
The story of Krishna Section XIV. The moon and the stars --
Selene and Pan --
Io the Heifer --
Argos Panoptes --
Io and Prometheus --
Hekate --
Artemis --
The Arkadian and Delian Artemis --
Artemis Orthia and Taurpola --
Iphigenia and Britomartis --
Chapter III. The Lost Treasure --
Section I. The golden fleece --
The myth of stolen treasure found among all the Aryan nations --
Repetition of this myth under different forms --
The Golden Fleece --
The Argonautic voyage --
Iason and Medeia --
Section II. Helen --
The wealth of Helen --
The stealing of Helen and her treasures --
The story of Conall Gulban --
The voyage of the Achaians to Ilion --
Meleagros and Kleopatra --
Thetis and Achilleus --
The womanly Achilleus --
The career of Achilleus --
The nostoi --
Odysseus and Autolykos --
Odysseus and Penelope --
The womanly Odysseus --
Odysseus the wanderer --
Odysseus and Aiolos --
The Laistrygonians --
The Lotos eaters --
Kirke and Kalypso --
Section III. The children of the sun --
The expulsion of the Herakleids --
The return of the Herakleids --
Section IV. The Theban wars --
Adrastos and Amphiaros --
The sons of Oedipous --
Tydeus --
The war of the Epigonoi --
Antigone and Haimon --
Alkaimon and Eriphyle --
Orestes and Klytaimnestra --
Chapter IV. The fire --
Section I. Agni --
Light and heat --
Physical attributes of Agni --
The Infant Agni --
Agni the Psychopompos --
The tongues of Agni --
Agni and Hephaistos --
Section II. Phoroneus and Hestia --
The wind and the fire --
The Argive Phroneus --
Hestia --
The sacred fire --
Section III. Hephaistos and Loki --
The maimed Hephaistos --
The forge of Hephaistos --
Hephaistos and Athene --
The Latin Vulcan --
The fire God Loki --
Loki the Thief --
Section IV. Promotheus --
The Hesiodic age --
The Heroic age --
The Prometheus of Aeschylos --
The punishment of Prometheus --
The cheating of Zeus --
Prometheus and Pandora --
Prometheus and Deukalion --
Prometheus and Io --
Section V. The lightning --
The Titans --
The Kyklopes --
Schamir and Sassafras --
Ahmed and Tanhauser --
The Greedy Alcade --
Medieval spells --
Chapter V. The winds --
Section I. Yayu and the Maruts --
Yayu and Favonius --
Boreas and the Maruts --
The crushers or grinders --
Rudra --
Section II. Hermes --
Hindu and Greek myths of the wind --
The infancy of Hermes --
The theft of the cattle --
The covenant of Hermes and Phoibos --
The meaning of this covenant --
The rivalry between Hermes and Phoibos --
Hermes the God of the moving air --
Transparent clearness of the myth --
Humor of the myth --
The craft of Hermes --
Hermes and the Charites --
Hermes the Herald --
Section III. Orpheus --
Points of difference between Orpheus and Hermes --
The Seirens --
The Piper of Hamein --
The Jew among the thorns --
Enchanted Harps and horns --
The harp of Wainamonen --
Galdner the singer --
The Sibyl --
Section IV. Pan --
The song of the breeze in the reeds --
Pan, the purifying breeze --
Pan and Syrinx --
Section V. Amphion and Zethos --
The Theban Orpheus --
Zethos and Prokne --
Linos and Zephyros --
Section VI. Ailos and Ares --
The Guardian of the winds --
The storms --
Ares and Athene --
Chapter VI. The waters --
Section I. The dwellers in the sea --
Proteus and Nereus --
Glaukos --
Naids and Nereids --
Swan maidens and Apsaras --
Triotn and Amphitrite --
The Seirens --
Skylla and Charybdis --
The Megarian Skylla --
Section II. The Lord of the waters --
Zeus Poseidon --
Poseidon and Athene --
Poseidon and the Telchines --
Poseidon the bondman --
Melikertes --
The Ocean stream --
Section III. The rivers and fountains --
Danaos and Aigyptos --
Their sons and daughters --
Hypermnestra and Lynkeus --
Origin of the myth --
The Lyrkeios --
Chapter VII. The clouds --
Section I. The children of the mist --
Phrixos and Helle --
Athamas and Ino --
Section II. The cloudland --
The Phaikians --
The palace of Alkinoos --
The fleets of Alkinoos --
The Phaikians and Odysseus --
Niobe and Leto --
The cattle of Helios --
Section III. The nymphs and swan maidens --
The sawn shaped Phorkides --
The muses and the Valkyrien --
The swan shaped Zeus --
Enchanted maidens --
The Hyades and Pleiades --
The Graiai --
The Gorgons --
Aktaion --
Medousa and Chrysaor --
Pegasos --
Section IV. The hunters and dancers of the heavens --
Orion --
Seirios --
The Telchines and Kouretes --
Chapter VIII. The Earth --
Section I. Dionysus --
The captivity of Dionysus --
Dionysus and Zangreos --
Dionysus the wanderer --
The womanly Dionysus --
The mothers of Dionysus --
Section II. Demeter --
The story of Persephone --
Iduna --
The Stupefying Narcissus --
The sleep of winter --
The story of Rapunzel --
The lengthening days --
The ill tempered princess --
The story of Surya Bai --
The nourishing Earth --
Holda --
The Eleusinian myth --
Demeter and Iason --
Ceres and Saturn --
Section III. The children of the earth --
Ericthonios --
Erechtheus --
Kekrops --
Pelops --
Section IV. The priests of the great mother --
Gaia and Ouranos --
Rhea --
The Kouretes and Idaioi Daktyloi --
The Kabeiroi and Korybantes --
Section V. The people of the woods and waters --
The satyrs --
The Seilenoi --
The Latin Silanus --
Priapos --
Chapter IX. The under world --
Section I. Hades --
The buried treasure --
Hades or Aidoneus --
The rivers of the unseen land --
Section II. Elysion --
The judges of the dead --
The asphodel meadows Chapter X. The darkness --
Section I. Vritra and Ahi --
The story of Sarama and Helen --
Indra and Achilleus --
The struggle between light and darkness --
The great enemy --
Pani and Paris --
Snakes and worms --
The stolen cattle --
The blocking up of fountains --
The stolen nymphs --
Ravana and Sita --
The Trojan Paris --
Helen and Penelope --
Herakles and Echidna --
Orthros --
Typhon --
Section II. The Latin Myth --
Hercules and Cacus --
Cacus another form of Vritra --
Sancus or Recaranus --
Section II. Bellerophon --
The monster Belleros --
Leophontes --
Section IV. The Theban myth --
The sphinx --
The riddle solved --
The voice of the thunder --
Section V. The Delphian and Cretan myths --
The Pythian dragon --
The Minotaur --
Section VI. The gloaming and the night --
The Phorkides, Graiai, and Gorgons --
The night and the winter --
Modification of the myth --
Section VIII. The physical struggle spiritualized --
Contrast between Hindu and Iranian mythology --
Identity of names in Vedic and Persian mythology --
Azidahaka and Zohak --
Iranian dualism --
Its influence on the Jews --
The epic of Firdusi --
Section VIII. The Semitic and Aryan devil --
The Semitic Satan --
Effect of Christian teaching --
The Teutonic devil --
Wayland the Smith --
The Blinded devil.
Other Titles: Aryan mythology

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schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1969"
schema:description"V.1 cont. Chapter V. Greek conceptions of mythical tradition -- Gradual conceptions of mythical tradition -- Gradual assignment of an historical character to mythical beings -- Each clan or tribe regarded its own traditions as distinct from any other -- This belief wholly without foundation -- Connection between the legends of Argos, Thebes, and Athens -- The imagery of these legends -- Significance of the names employed in Greek legends -- Opinions of Greek Writers, and their value -- Chapter VI. Greek notions respecting the moral aspect of mythology -- Coarse development of certain mythical phrases -- Protests of Greek writers -- Limits of their knowledge -- Explanations of the seeming immorality of Aryan mythology -- The morality of the Hesiodic poems -- Chapter VII. Theory of Greek mythology as an eclectic system -- Reproduction of the same myth under different forms -- No historical conclusions to be drawn from the complications so caused -- Conclusions drawn from a comparison of Greek with Teutonic legends -- Theory of Dr. Döllinger on the origin of Greek mythology -- This theory stats on an assumption for which there is no evidence -- Historical speculations of Dr. Döllinger -- They leave the real difficulties of Greek mythology unexplained -- Chapter VIII. The diffusion of myths -- The common element in Aryan mythology -- The Greek mythology of itself explains this common element -- The Teutonic mythology points in precisely the same direction -- The mission link supplied in the older Vedic poems -- The key to all Aryan mythology -- Germs of mythical tales -- Groundwork of Aryan mythology -- Greek dynastic legends -- Growth of popular traditions -- Legends not resolvable into phrases relating to physical phenomena -- The Brahman and the goat -- The master thief -- The legend of Rhampsinitos -- The story of the poor mason -- The story of Karpara and Gata -- The story of Trophonios and Agamedes -- The shifty lad -- Point and drift of these stories -- The Hellenic master thief -- The origin of the story -- Limits to the hypothesis of conscious borrowing -- Framework of popular stories -- The dog and the sparrow -- The Nautch girl and the parrot -- Origin and growth of these stories -- The stories of Vicram and Hermotimos -- The table, the ass, and the stick -- The Brahman, the jackal, and the barber -- The lad who went to the North wind -- The story of Punchkin -- The giant who had no heart in his body -- Mythical repetitions and combinations -- Agency of beasts in these stories -- The two brothers -- Influence of written literature on folk-lore -- The stories of king Putraka and the three princesses of Whiteland -- Faithful John -- Rama and Luxman -- Mythical imagery of these stories -- The pilgrim of love -- The spell of mid-day -- The sleep or death of summer -- Origin of all myths relating to the charmed sleep of beautiful maidens -- Charms and spells in the Odyssey and in Hindu stories -- The snake leaves -- Myths of the night, the moon, and the stars -- The battle of light and darkness -- Character of Aryan folklore -- Historical value of Aryan popular traditions -- Chapter IX. Modern euemerism -- The method of Euemeros -- Its antagonism with the science of language -- The science of language in its bearing on history -- The Wolfian theory -- The real question at issue -- Residuum of historical fact in the Iliad -- The test of Homeric credibility -- Laws of evidence -- Their application in English courts of justice -- Application to Homeric history -- Value of the historical residuum in the Iliad -- Difficulties involved in the traditional view -- Euemeristic methods of dealing with the Homeric narratives -- Their irreconcilable results -- Value of traditional impressions -- The legend of Roland and the Nibelungenlied -- Principles of evidence -- The Homeric controversy -- The return of the Herekleids -- The Herekleid conquests not historical -- The origin of the traditions of the Herakleid conquests -- Materials of epical tradition -- Materials of the poems commonly called Homeric -- Attempted distinction between the sciences of language and mythology -- Assumed early popularity of our Iliad and Odyssey -- The evidence of the case -- The Homer of the Greek tragic poets -- Results of the inquiry"@en
schema:description"Chapter X. The darkness -- Section I. Vritra and Ahi -- The story of Sarama and Helen -- Indra and Achilleus -- The struggle between light and darkness -- The great enemy -- Pani and Paris -- Snakes and worms -- The stolen cattle -- The blocking up of fountains -- The stolen nymphs -- Ravana and Sita -- The Trojan Paris -- Helen and Penelope -- Herakles and Echidna -- Orthros -- Typhon -- Section II. The Latin Myth -- Hercules and Cacus -- Cacus another form of Vritra -- Sancus or Recaranus -- Section II. Bellerophon -- The monster Belleros -- Leophontes -- Section IV. The Theban myth -- The sphinx -- The riddle solved -- The voice of the thunder -- Section V. The Delphian and Cretan myths -- The Pythian dragon -- The Minotaur -- Section VI. The gloaming and the night -- The Phorkides, Graiai, and Gorgons -- The night and the winter -- Modification of the myth -- Section VIII. The physical struggle spiritualized -- Contrast between Hindu and Iranian mythology -- Identity of names in Vedic and Persian mythology -- Azidahaka and Zohak -- Iranian dualism -- Its influence on the Jews -- The epic of Firdusi -- Section VIII. The Semitic and Aryan devil -- The Semitic Satan -- Effect of Christian teaching -- The Teutonic devil -- Wayland the Smith -- The Blinded devil."@en
schema:description"V. 1 cont. Chapter X. The character of Greek dynastic and popular legends in relation to tribal and national names -- Fertility of mythical phrases -- Legends of rival Greek cities -- The Argive story -- The Theban story -- The Megarian story -- The Athenian story -- The story of the Pelopids -- Connection of these stories with the tribal or national names -- The Athenians -- Ionians and Phenicians -- Argives and Arkadians -- Delians and Lykians -- Ethiopians -- Danaans and Achaians -- Hellenes and Aiolians -- Greeks and Hesperians -- Italian and Teutonic tribal names -- Ethnological inferences -- Chapter XI. Mythical phrases furnishing the materials of the Homeric poems -- Extent of the old Homeric literature -- Extent of Homeric mythology -- The tale of the Achilleis -- The close of the Achilleis -- The whole Achilleis a solar epic -- The Trojan war only one scene of a long drama -- The Ilias as contrasted with the Achilleis -- Groundwork of the Odyssey -- How much of the Iliad or the Odyssey belongs to the invention of the poet -- The portraits of the greater chieftains and heroes not true to national character -- The character of Odysseus -- How far was the character of Odysseus a creation of the Homeric poet -- The character of Odysseus not Achaian -- Chapter XII. Mythical phrases furnishing materials for the teutonic epic poems, and the legends of Arthur and Roland -- Points of likeness between the Greek and Teutonic epics -- The Volsung tale -- The story of Sigurd -- The story of Gudrun -- Helgi sagas -- The first Helgi -- The second Helgi -- The third Helgi -- Sigurd, Siegfried, and Baldur -- The story of Hagen -- The vengeance of Kriemhild -- Historical element in the Nibelungenlied -- The story of Walthar of Aquitaine -- Dietrich of Bern -- The great Rose garden -- The romance of Roland -- The story of king Arthur -- The round table and the San Greal -- Arthur's knights -- Lancelot and Guinevere -- The death of Arthur -- Guinevere and Diarmaid -- Later mediaeval epics and romances -- Saga literature of Europe -- The Grettir saga -- The character of Grettir -- Materials of the saga -- Grettir and boots -- Parallelisms between the Grettir saga and other myths -- The avenging of Grettir"@en
schema:description"V.1 cont Book II. -- Chapter I. The ethereal heavens -- Section I. Dyaus -- Ideas of heaven -- The glistening ether -- Dyaus and Prithivi -- Ideas denoted by the name Dyu -- Section II. Varuna and Mitra -- The solid heaven -- Moral aspects of Varuna -- Aryan monotheism -- Aditi and the Adityas -- The physical and spiritual Varuna -- Section III. Indra -- The primary conception of Indra purely physical -- Action of the Vedic and Achaian deities -- Indra a god of the bright heaven -- Meaning of the name -- The might and majesty of Indra -- Indra the rain-bringer -- Physical conflict between light and darkness -- The wife of Indra -- Section IV. Brahma -- Place of Brahma in the Hindu theogony -- Prajapati -- Visvakarman -- Section V. Zeus -- The dwelling of Zeus in ether -- The unchanging light -- The idea of Zeus suggested by physical phenomena -- The Latin Jupiter -- Zeus ouranion -- The mythical and spiritual Zeus -- The Zeus of the tragic poets -- The name Zeus, and its transformations -- The Zeus of local traditions -- The birth of Zeus -- The iniquities of Kronos -- The war of the Titans -- Other forms of this struggle -- The loves of Zeus -- The twelve Olympian deities -- The Cretan and Arkadian Zeus -- Lykosoura and Lykaon -- The Dodanaian and Olympian Zeus -- Limits to the power of Zeus -- The messengers of Zeus -- Zeus the judge -- Section VI. Odin, Woden, Wuotan -- Characteristics of Teutonic mythology -- Teutonic theogonies -- Genealogy of Odin -- Odin as the creator of man -- The end of the Asas or Aesir -- The name Wuotan -- The one-eyed Wuotan -- Odin the rain-giver -- Odin the all-father -- Tyr and Odin -- Section VII. Thunder, Donar, Thor -- The name Donar -- Thor the all-father -- His triple functions -- Section VIII. Fro -- Relations of Fro to Freya -- Section IX. Heimdall, Bragi, and Oegir -- The lard of Himinbiorg -- Bragi, the lord of day -- Oegir the sea-god -- Chapter II. The light -- Section I. Surya and Savitar -- Surya, the pervading irresistible luminary -- The one-handed Savitar -- The power of Savitar -- Section II. Soma -- The physical and spiritual Soma -- Powers of Soma -- Section III. Correlative deities -- Complementary deities -- The dualism of nature -- Functions of the Asvins -- Parentage of the Asvins -- The twins -- Soma and Surya -- Section IV. The dawn -- The lonely wanderer -- Development of the myth -- The story of Urvasi -- Germs of the story of Penelope -- The dawn and the waters -- Eros and Phsyche -- The search of the dawn for the sun -- The search of the sun for the dawn -- Origin of these myths -- East of the sun and west of the moon -- The wanderers in the forest -- The spell of moonlight -- The seven Rishis -- The Arkshas or Shiners -- The Rishis and Manu -- Section V. Dawn goddesses -- Ushas and Eos -- Ushas the broad-spreading -- Ahana -- Sarama -- The cows o Indra -- The Fidelity of Sarama -- Saranyu -- Erinys -- The Harpies -- Arjuni -- The horses of the sun -- Arushi -- Snakes and dragons -- Sorcery and witchcraft -- The story of Medeia -- The myth of Prokris -- Eos and Tithonos -- Hebe and Ganymeda -- The story of Dido and Anna -- Hero and Leiandros -- The brides of the sun -- The Arkadian Auge -- Europe and the bull -- Althaia and the burning brand -- Section VI. Athene -- The original idea of Athene purely physical -- Athene Tritogeneia -- Birth and parentage of Athene -- Athene mother of Phoibos and Lychnos -- Epithets of Athene -- Athene the guardian of heroes -- The Latin Minerva."@en
schema:description"Section XIV. The moon and the stars -- Selene and Pan -- Io the Heifer -- Argos Panoptes -- Io and Prometheus -- Hekate -- Artemis -- The Arkadian and Delian Artemis -- Artemis Orthia and Taurpola -- Iphigenia and Britomartis -- Chapter III. The Lost Treasure -- Section I. The golden fleece -- The myth of stolen treasure found among all the Aryan nations -- Repetition of this myth under different forms -- The Golden Fleece -- The Argonautic voyage -- Iason and Medeia -- Section II. Helen -- The wealth of Helen -- The stealing of Helen and her treasures -- The story of Conall Gulban -- The voyage of the Achaians to Ilion -- Meleagros and Kleopatra -- Thetis and Achilleus -- The womanly Achilleus -- The career of Achilleus -- The nostoi -- Odysseus and Autolykos -- Odysseus and Penelope -- The womanly Odysseus -- Odysseus the wanderer -- Odysseus and Aiolos -- The Laistrygonians -- The Lotos eaters -- Kirke and Kalypso -- Section III. The children of the sun -- The expulsion of the Herakleids -- The return of the Herakleids -- Section IV. The Theban wars -- Adrastos and Amphiaros -- The sons of Oedipous -- Tydeus -- The war of the Epigonoi -- Antigone and Haimon -- Alkaimon and Eriphyle -- Orestes and Klytaimnestra -- Chapter IV. The fire -- Section I. Agni -- Light and heat -- Physical attributes of Agni -- The Infant Agni -- Agni the Psychopompos -- The tongues of Agni -- Agni and Hephaistos -- Section II. Phoroneus and Hestia -- The wind and the fire -- The Argive Phroneus -- Hestia -- The sacred fire -- Section III. Hephaistos and Loki -- The maimed Hephaistos -- The forge of Hephaistos -- Hephaistos and Athene -- The Latin Vulcan -- The fire God Loki -- Loki the Thief -- Section IV. Promotheus -- The Hesiodic age -- The Heroic age -- The Prometheus of Aeschylos -- The punishment of Prometheus -- The cheating of Zeus -- Prometheus and Pandora -- Prometheus and Deukalion -- Prometheus and Io -- Section V. The lightning -- The Titans -- The Kyklopes -- Schamir and Sassafras -- Ahmed and Tanhauser -- The Greedy Alcade -- Medieval spells -- Chapter V. The winds -- Section I. Yayu and the Maruts -- Yayu and Favonius -- Boreas and the Maruts -- The crushers or grinders -- Rudra -- Section II. Hermes -- Hindu and Greek myths of the wind -- The infancy of Hermes -- The theft of the cattle -- The covenant of Hermes and Phoibos -- The meaning of this covenant -- The rivalry between Hermes and Phoibos -- Hermes the God of the moving air -- Transparent clearness of the myth -- Humor of the myth -- The craft of Hermes -- Hermes and the Charites -- Hermes the Herald -- Section III. Orpheus -- Points of difference between Orpheus and Hermes -- The Seirens -- The Piper of Hamein -- The Jew among the thorns -- Enchanted Harps and horns -- The harp of Wainamonen -- Galdner the singer -- The Sibyl -- Section IV. Pan -- The song of the breeze in the reeds -- Pan, the purifying breeze -- Pan and Syrinx -- Section V. Amphion and Zethos -- The Theban Orpheus -- Zethos and Prokne -- Linos and Zephyros -- Section VI. Ailos and Ares -- The Guardian of the winds -- The storms -- Ares and Athene -- Chapter VI. The waters -- Section I. The dwellers in the sea -- Proteus and Nereus -- Glaukos -- Naids and Nereids -- Swan maidens and Apsaras -- Triotn and Amphitrite -- The Seirens -- Skylla and Charybdis -- The Megarian Skylla -- Section II. The Lord of the waters -- Zeus Poseidon -- Poseidon and Athene -- Poseidon and the Telchines -- Poseidon the bondman -- Melikertes -- The Ocean stream -- Section III. The rivers and fountains -- Danaos and Aigyptos -- Their sons and daughters -- Hypermnestra and Lynkeus -- Origin of the myth -- The Lyrkeios -- Chapter VII. The clouds -- Section I. The children of the mist -- Phrixos and Helle -- Athamas and Ino -- Section II. The cloudland -- The Phaikians -- The palace of Alkinoos -- The fleets of Alkinoos -- The Phaikians and Odysseus -- Niobe and Leto -- The cattle of Helios -- Section III. The nymphs and swan maidens -- The sawn shaped Phorkides -- The muses and the Valkyrien -- The swan shaped Zeus -- Enchanted maidens -- The Hyades and Pleiades -- The Graiai -- The Gorgons -- Aktaion -- Medousa and Chrysaor -- Pegasos -- Section IV. The hunters and dancers of the heavens -- Orion -- Seirios -- The Telchines and Kouretes -- Chapter VIII. The Earth -- Section I. Dionysus -- The captivity of Dionysus -- Dionysus and Zangreos -- Dionysus the wanderer -- The womanly Dionysus -- The mothers of Dionysus -- Section II. Demeter -- The story of Persephone -- Iduna -- The Stupefying Narcissus -- The sleep of winter -- The story of Rapunzel -- The lengthening days -- The ill tempered princess -- The story of Surya Bai -- The nourishing Earth -- Holda -- The Eleusinian myth -- Demeter and Iason -- Ceres and Saturn -- Section III. The children of the earth -- Ericthonios -- Erechtheus -- Kekrops -- Pelops -- Section IV. The priests of the great mother -- Gaia and Ouranos -- Rhea -- The Kouretes and Idaioi Daktyloi -- The Kabeiroi and Korybantes -- Section V. The people of the woods and waters -- The satyrs -- The Seilenoi -- The Latin Silanus -- Priapos -- Chapter IX. The under world -- Section I. Hades -- The buried treasure -- Hades or Aidoneus -- The rivers of the unseen land -- Section II. Elysion -- The judges of the dead -- The asphodel meadows"@en
schema:description"V. 2 Chapter II: The light -- Section VII: Aphrodite -- Birth of Aphrodite -- The ministers of Aphrodite -- The arrows of Aphrodite -- Her children -- Her share in the Trojan War -- Aphrodite and Adonis -- The armed Aphrodite -- The Latin Venus -- Adonis and Dionysos -- Section VIII: Here -- Myths relating to the birth of Here -- Relations of Zeus and Here -- Here and Ixion -- Here Akraia -- Here the Matron -- The Latin Juno -- Section IX: The Erinyes -- Doctrine of necessity -- The conflict between light and darkness -- Erinyes and Eumenides -- The fatal sisters -- The Teutonic Norns -- Nemesis and Adrasteia -- Tyche Akraia -- Section X: Hellenic sun-gods and heroes -- The Ionian legend of the brith of Phoibos -- The Delphian story -- The infant Phoibos -- Phoibos Delphinios -- The fish-sun -- Phoibos and Hermes -- Phoibos and Helios -- Phoibos and Daphne -- Alpheios and Arethousa -- Endymion -- The story of Narkissos -- Iamos and Asklepios -- Ixion and Atlas -- The garden of the Hesperides -- Hyperion -- Helios and Phaethon -- Patroklos and Telemachos -- The bondage of Phoibos and Herakles -- Character of Herakles -- Herakles and Eurystheus -- The lions of Kithairon and Nemea -- Herakles and Kerberos -- The madness of Herakles -- Orthros and Hydra -- The Marathonian and the Cretan bulls -- The girdle of Hippolyte -- Myths interspersed among the legends of the twelve labours of Herakles -- Herakles and Eurytos -- Herakles and Auge -- Herakles and Deianeira -- The death of Herakles -- The Latin Herakles -- Egyptian myths -- Repetitions of the myth of Herakles -- The story of Perseus -- Birth and youth of Theseus -- The six exploits of his first journey -- Theseus at Athens -- Theseus and the Minotauros -- Theseus and the Amazons -- Theseus in the underworld -- Hipponoos Bellerphontes -- The brith of Oidipous -- The career of Oidipous -- The blinded Oidipous -- Oidipous and Antigone -- The story of Telephos -- Twofold aspect of the Trojan Paris -- The birth and infancy of Paris -- The judgement of Paris -- Paris and Helen -- Iamos -- Pelias and Neleus -- Romulus and Remus -- Cyrus and Astayges -- Chandragupta -- Kadmos and Europe -- Minos and the Minotaur -- Rhadamanthys and Aiakos -- Nestor and Sarpedon -- Memnon the Etheopian -- Kephalos and Eos -- Section XI: Teutonic sun-gods and heroes -- Baldur and Brond -- The dream of Baldur -- The death of Baldur -- The avenging of Baldur -- The story of tell and Gelser -- The myth wholly without historical foundation -- Utter impossibility of the Swiss story -- Other versions of the myth of Tell -- Tell the far-shooting Apollon -- Section XII: The vivifying sun -- Flexible character of Vishnu -- Vishnu the striding God -- Dwarf incarnation -- The palace of Vishnu -- Avatars of Vishnu -- Emblems associated with the worship of Vishnu -- Sensuous stage of language -- Aryan and semitic monotheism -- Ideas and symbols of the vivifying power in nature -- Rods and pillars -- Tree and serpent worship -- Sacrifices connected with this worship -- Symbols of wealth -- The Lotos -- Goblets and horns -- Gradual refinement of the myth -- Aryan and Semitic mysteries -- Real meaning of tree and serpent worship -- Section XIII. The Sun Gods of Later Hindu mythology -- Vishnu and Krishna -- Parentage of Krishna -- Krishna and Rudra -- Vishnu and Rama -- The story of Krishna"@en
schema:description"V.1 Book I. -- Chapter I. Popular theories on the origin and growth of mythology -- Method of inquiry -- The nature of the problem to be solved -- Condition of society in the Greek heroic age -- Character of 'Homeric' mythology -- Contrast between mythological and religious belief -- The lyric and tragic poets conscious of the contrast -- Historical significance of Greek mythology -- Conflicting views as to its origin -- Hypothesis of an original revelation -- Extent of original revelation -- Its alleged perversion by the Greeks, as shown in the attributes of their gods -- System of secondaries -- Inventive, as distinguished from traditive, deities -- Nature of the doctrines perverted in Greek mythology -- Attributes of Athene and Apollon -- Relations of will between Zeus and Athene -- Peculiar forms of Greek mythology -- Consequences involved in the perversion of an original revelation -- Comparison of the Homeric with the Vedic mythology -- Methods of determining the extent of primitive revelation -- Evidence of the book of Genesis -- Limits of this evidence -- Course of revelation in the Old Testament -- Necessity of accounting for the character of Greek mythology -- Conditions of the inquiry -- Allegorical interpretation of myths -- Lord Bacon's method -- Its consequences -- Unscientific character of such interpretations -- Chapter II. The revelation of mythology to language -- Origin of abstract words -- Expansive power of sensuous words -- Origin of language -- Immobility of savage races -- Historical results of the analysis of language -- Earliest conditions of thought -- Chapter III. The source of mythical speech -- The infancy of mankind -- Primary myths -- Secondary myths -- Polyonymy, as affecting the growth of mythology -- Use of abstract and concrete names -- Myths arising from the use of equivocal words -- Disintegration of myths -- Chapter IV. The development of myths -- Elasticity of mythical speech -- Results of mythical language -- Evidence of this development furnished by the Rig-Veda -- Relative age of Greek myths -- Solar myths -- Changeful action of the sun -- Repulsive developments of solar legends -- Origin of these developments -- Tendency to localize mythical incidents -- Vitality of the mythopoeic faculty -- Constant demand for new mythical narratives -- Groundwork of the mythology of Northern Europe -- Groundwork of the 'Homeric' mythology -- Comparison of Greek and Norse mythology -- Special characteristics of Greek mythology -- Full development of Greek mythology -- Arrested growth of Northern mythology -- Light thrown on both by the Vedic hymns -- Stages in the growth of mythical systems"@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1143584>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The mythology of the Aryan nations."@en
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schema:publisher
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