přejít na obsah
The name of war : King Philip's War and the origins of American identity Náhled dokumentu
ZavřítNáhled dokumentu
Probíhá kontrola...

The name of war : King Philip's War and the origins of American identity

Autor Jill Lepore
Vydavatel: New York : Knopf, 1998.
Vydání/formát:   Kniha : English : 1st edZobrazit všechny vydání a formáty
Databáze:WorldCat
Shrnutí:
Publisher description: King Philip's War, the excruciating racial war--colonists against Indians--that erupted in New England in 1675, was, in proportion to population, the bloodiest in American history. Some even argued that the massacres and outrages on both sides were too horrific to "deserve the name of a war." It all began when Philip (called Metacom by his own people), the leader of the Wampanoag Indians, led  Přečíst více...
Hodnocení:

(ještě nehodnoceno) 0 zobrazit recenze - Buďte první.

Předmětová hesla:
Více podobných

 

Vyhledat exemplář v knihovně

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Vyhledávání knihoven, které vlastní tento dokument...

Detaily

Doplňující formát: Online version:
Lepore, Jill, 1966-
Name of war.
New York : Knopf, 1998
(OCoLC)605311939
Typ dokumentu: Book
Všichni autoři/tvůrci: Jill Lepore
ISBN: 0679446869 9780679446866
OCLC číslo: 36573588
Popis: xxviii, 337 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Obsahy: What's in a name? --
A brief chronology of King Philip's War --
Prologue: The circle --
Pt. 1. Language. Beware of any linguist ; The story of it printed --
Pt. 2. War. Habitations of cruelty ; Where is your O God? --
Pt. 3. Bondage. Come go along with us ; A dangerous merchandise --
Pt. 4. Memory. The blasphemous leviathan ; The curse of Metamora --
Epilogue: The rock.
Odpovědnost: Jill Lepore.
Více informací:

Anotace:

Publisher description: King Philip's War, the excruciating racial war--colonists against Indians--that erupted in New England in 1675, was, in proportion to population, the bloodiest in American history. Some even argued that the massacres and outrages on both sides were too horrific to "deserve the name of a war." It all began when Philip (called Metacom by his own people), the leader of the Wampanoag Indians, led attacks against English towns in the colony of Plymouth. The war spread quickly, pitting a loose confederation of southeastern Algonquians against a coalition of English colonists. While it raged, colonial armies pursued enemy Indians through the swamps and woods of New England, and Indians attacked English farms and towns from Narragansett Bay to the Connecticut River Valley. Both sides, in fact, had pursued the war seemingly without restraint, killing women and children, torturing captives, and mutilating the dead. The fighting ended after Philip was shot, quartered, and beheaded in August 1676. The war's brutality compelled the colonists to defend themselves against accusations that they had become savages. But Jill Lepore makes clear that it was after the war--and because of it--that the boundaries between cultures, hitherto blurred, turned into rigid ones. King Philip's War became one of the most written-about wars in our history, and Lepore argues that the words strengthened and hardened feelings that, in turn, strengthened and hardened the enmity between Indians and Anglos. She shows how, as late as the nineteenth century, memories of the war were instrumental in justifying Indian removals--and how in our own century that same war has inspired Indian attempts to preserve "Indianness" as fiercely as the early settlers once struggled to preserve their Englishness. Telling the story of what may have been the bitterest of American conflicts, and its reverberations over the centuries, Lepore has enabled us to see how the ways in which we remember past events are as important in their effect on our history as were the events themselves.

Recenze

Recenze vložené uživatelem
Nahrávání recenzí GoodReads...
Přebírání recenzí DOGO books...

Štítky

Štítky všech uživatelů (7)

Zobrazit nejoblíbenější štítky jako: seznam štítků | tag cloud

Potvrdit tento požadavek

Tento dokument jste si již vyžádali. Prosím vyberte Ok pokud chcete přesto v žádance pokračovat.

Propojená data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/36573588>
library:oclcnum"36573588"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/36573588>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/969954>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Indians of North America--Wars."@en
schema:name"Indians of North America--Wars"@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"1st ed."
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1998"
schema:description"What's in a name? -- A brief chronology of King Philip's War -- Prologue: The circle -- Pt. 1. Language. Beware of any linguist ; The story of it printed -- Pt. 2. War. Habitations of cruelty ; Where is your O God? -- Pt. 3. Bondage. Come go along with us ; A dangerous merchandise -- Pt. 4. Memory. The blasphemous leviathan ; The curse of Metamora -- Epilogue: The rock."@en
schema:description"Publisher description: King Philip's War, the excruciating racial war--colonists against Indians--that erupted in New England in 1675, was, in proportion to population, the bloodiest in American history. Some even argued that the massacres and outrages on both sides were too horrific to "deserve the name of a war." It all began when Philip (called Metacom by his own people), the leader of the Wampanoag Indians, led attacks against English towns in the colony of Plymouth. The war spread quickly, pitting a loose confederation of southeastern Algonquians against a coalition of English colonists. While it raged, colonial armies pursued enemy Indians through the swamps and woods of New England, and Indians attacked English farms and towns from Narragansett Bay to the Connecticut River Valley. Both sides, in fact, had pursued the war seemingly without restraint, killing women and children, torturing captives, and mutilating the dead. The fighting ended after Philip was shot, quartered, and beheaded in August 1676. The war's brutality compelled the colonists to defend themselves against accusations that they had become savages. But Jill Lepore makes clear that it was after the war--and because of it--that the boundaries between cultures, hitherto blurred, turned into rigid ones. King Philip's War became one of the most written-about wars in our history, and Lepore argues that the words strengthened and hardened feelings that, in turn, strengthened and hardened the enmity between Indians and Anglos. She shows how, as late as the nineteenth century, memories of the war were instrumental in justifying Indian removals--and how in our own century that same war has inspired Indian attempts to preserve "Indianness" as fiercely as the early settlers once struggled to preserve their Englishness. Telling the story of what may have been the bitterest of American conflicts, and its reverberations over the centuries, Lepore has enabled us to see how the ways in which we remember past events are as important in their effect on our history as were the events themselves."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/570218>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The name of war : King Philip's War and the origins of American identity"@en
schema:numberOfPages"337"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Zavřít okno

Prosím přihlaste se do WorldCat 

Nemáte účet? Můžete si jednoduše vytvořit bezplatný účet.