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Nanosciences : the invisible revolution

Author: C Joachim; Laurence Plévert; John Crisp
Publisher: Singapore ; Hackensack, NJ : World Scientific, ©2009.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Product Description: The nanosciences and their companion nanotechnologies are a hot topic all around the world. For some, they promise developments ranging from nanobots to revolutionary new materials. For others, they raise the specter of Big Brother and of atomically modified organisms (AMOs). This book is a counterbalance to spin and paranoia alike, asking us to consider what the nanosciences really are.  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: C Joachim; Laurence Plévert; John Crisp
ISBN: 9812837140 9789812837141
OCLC Number: 429011858
Notes: Originally published in French by Editions du Seuil in 2008.
Description: ix, 117 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Contents: Acknowledgments --
Introduction: Infinities in a grain of sand --
1: Case Of misdirection --
Political hijacking --
Temporary end of sustainable industrial development --
Planet goes nano --
2: Incredible shrinking chip --
Mythical speech --
Giants of miniaturization --
From electron to electronics --
Enter Gordon Moore --
Needle upright on a football pitch --
First limits to miniaturization --
Contagious miniaturization --
Welcome to the quantum world --
Pardon me, did you say "mesoscopic"? --
Electronics of tomorrow --
Guiding thread --
3: Staying at the bottom --
Birth of the molecule --
So how big is a molecule? --
Maxwell's demon --
How to connect a molecule --
Man moves atom --
Yet it moves! --
First experiments in nanophysics --
Mechanics of a molecule --
Advantage of staying at the bottom --
4: Monumentalization --
Advent of molecule devices --
Wire --
Ampermeter --
Cantilever --
Molecule machines --
Calculating molecules --
Quantum computing molecules --
Molecular factories --
Bigger and bigger? --
Retreat to nanomaterials --
5: Nannobacteria --
Ripples from a meteorite --
Surrounded by nanoaliens --
Missing link --
Molecular fabrication of life --
Lessons of mother nature --
6: Who's afraid Of nanotechnologies? --
AMOs: atomically modified organisms --
Another threat on the horizon: nanomaterials --
Electronic spies --
On the road to nanomedicine? --
Potential military applications --
Where next? --
In search of common sense --
Appendix 1: Short history of microscopy --
X-Ray diffraction --
Copper phthalocyanine in pictures --
Birth of electron microscopy --
Scanning tunneling microscope --
Appendix 2: Trials and tribulations of a prefix --
Bibliography --
Works by multiple authors --
Other references.
Responsibility: Christian Joachim, Laurence Plévert ; translated by John Crisp.

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Offers a scientific and historical perspective on the subject of nanosciences.  Read more...

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schema:description"Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Infinities in a grain of sand -- 1: Case Of misdirection -- Political hijacking -- Temporary end of sustainable industrial development -- Planet goes nano -- 2: Incredible shrinking chip -- Mythical speech -- Giants of miniaturization -- From electron to electronics -- Enter Gordon Moore -- Needle upright on a football pitch -- First limits to miniaturization -- Contagious miniaturization -- Welcome to the quantum world -- Pardon me, did you say "mesoscopic"? -- Electronics of tomorrow -- Guiding thread -- 3: Staying at the bottom -- Birth of the molecule -- So how big is a molecule? -- Maxwell's demon -- How to connect a molecule -- Man moves atom -- Yet it moves! -- First experiments in nanophysics -- Mechanics of a molecule -- Advantage of staying at the bottom -- 4: Monumentalization -- Advent of molecule devices -- Wire -- Ampermeter -- Cantilever -- Molecule machines -- Calculating molecules -- Quantum computing molecules -- Molecular factories -- Bigger and bigger? -- Retreat to nanomaterials -- 5: Nannobacteria -- Ripples from a meteorite -- Surrounded by nanoaliens -- Missing link -- Molecular fabrication of life -- Lessons of mother nature -- 6: Who's afraid Of nanotechnologies? -- AMOs: atomically modified organisms -- Another threat on the horizon: nanomaterials -- Electronic spies -- On the road to nanomedicine? -- Potential military applications -- Where next? -- In search of common sense -- Appendix 1: Short history of microscopy -- X-Ray diffraction -- Copper phthalocyanine in pictures -- Birth of electron microscopy -- Scanning tunneling microscope -- Appendix 2: Trials and tribulations of a prefix -- Bibliography -- Works by multiple authors -- Other references."@en
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