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National Security Strategy of Charles de Gaulle

Author: Carol C Morehouse; NATIONAL WAR COLL WASHINGTON DC.
Publisher: Ft. Belvoir Defense Technical Information Center JAN 1995.
Edition/Format:   eBook : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Charles de Gaulle was driven by his vision of a return to French "global preeminence combined with a revitalization of French society"--A resumption of French traditional world status. The destruction wrought on France in two world wars when England and America assisted too little or too late left de Gaulle with a deep distrust of reliance on others in matters of vital national security. The bitter experience of  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Carol C Morehouse; NATIONAL WAR COLL WASHINGTON DC.
OCLC Number: 74283855
Description: 13 p.

Abstract:

Charles de Gaulle was driven by his vision of a return to French "global preeminence combined with a revitalization of French society"--A resumption of French traditional world status. The destruction wrought on France in two world wars when England and America assisted too little or too late left de Gaulle with a deep distrust of reliance on others in matters of vital national security. The bitter experience of France's second-class status among the World War II Allies left de Gaulle with a lasting distaste for dealing in international affairs from a position of weakness. De Gaulle could not accept a diminished status for France in world affairs after World War II. Pragmatism and idealism combined to impel him to seek to carve for France a greater role. Restoration of her status as a global power combined with a revitalization of French society militarily, politically, and economically were the cornerstones of de Gaulle's perception of French national interest. De Gaulle's "Grand Design" for foreign policy included the following: (1) development of a nuclear capability (an autonomous nuclear strike force and independent deterrent) to achieve the status of inclusion in the ranks of "nuclear powers"; (2) French withdrawal from NATO's unified military command structure, but with continued reliance on U.S. security guarantees and continued participation in NATO's political arrangements; (3) French leadership of a European political, military, and economic continental system; (4) exclusion of Great Britain from a continental system as long as she maintained her "special relationship" with the United States; and (5) the creation of Europe as a third world power.

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