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National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees. Series 1, Subseries 1, Sub-subseries 3. Doris Turner interview, 1975-1981.

Auteur : National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees.
Édition/format :   Documents d’archives : Anglais
Publication :Oral history interviews, 1975-1981
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
Specifically, the interview with Doris Turner regards her personal background; her experience as a dietary clerk at Lenox Hill Hospital; the race of hospital workers and race and sex discrimination against hospital workers; wage levels; working conditions; turnover rates; work assignments; literacy levels; living conditions for live-in workers; grievance settlement and complaints; meetings held between hospital
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Détails

Personne nommée : Leon J Davis; Moe Foner; Elliott Godoff; Martin Luther King; Floyd Sheppard; Norman Thomas; Doris Turner; Mike Quill; Malcolm X
Format : Document mixte
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees.
Numéro OCLC : 64091506
Dans : National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees
Description : 1 transcript (70 p.)

Résumé :

Specifically, the interview with Doris Turner regards her personal background; her experience as a dietary clerk at Lenox Hill Hospital; the race of hospital workers and race and sex discrimination against hospital workers; wage levels; working conditions; turnover rates; work assignments; literacy levels; living conditions for live-in workers; grievance settlement and complaints; meetings held between hospital administrators and workers; walkouts and protests staged by women workers; signing of membership cards; the establishment of 1199's union headquarters; 1199's organizing activities; the hospital administration's opposition to union organizing; the hiring of foreign women workers; and the firing of Turner for union activity and her subsequent reinstatement.

Also discussed is community support for the hospital strike of 1959; worker solidarity during the organizing campaign; the segregation of black workers from white patients; language differences among hospital workers; organizing activities of hospital workers at Lenox Hill; Turner's relationship with Godoff; the strike conduct and pickets; hospital administrators' reactions to the organizing campaign; the social composition of hospital boards of trustees; Mike Quill's participation in strike activities; changes in the organizational structure of 1199 during unionization of hospitals; the training of organizers and union staff; lobbying activities for the passage of collective bargaining legislation; Godoff's personality and organizing strategy; the distribution of leaflets and dues collection; Moe Foner's contacts with the media and union public relations; union administration under the Permanent Administrative Committee; and compulsory arbitration and the no-strike pledge.

Also discussed are the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital and Beth-El Hospital (1962) strikes and their effect on passage of collective bargaining legislation; the relationship of the civil rights movement to hospital unionization; the participation of Norman Thomas, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, and Floyd Sheppard in 1199's organizing campaign; rank and file members and union leadership; 1199's political goals and organizational structure; the relationship between Drug and Hospital Division leaders; Leon Davis' role in 1199 politics; the hiring of professionals for union leadership positions; the establishment of the Guild of Professional Workers; the community of interests between white and blue collar workers; union democracy and participation of the rank and file in union policy making and politics; communication between leaders and rank and file members; health care policies and the public interest; worker morale and pride; and the training and upgrading of hospital workers.

Doris Turner discusses, among other subjects, the ethnic composition of hospital staffs; sex discrimination against women hospital employees; 1199's organizing of hospital workers; the hospital strike of 1959; and union leadership, administration and politics.

Specifically, the interview with Doris Turner regards her personal background; her experience as a dietary clerk at Lenox Hill Hospital; the race of hospital workers and race and sex discrimination against hospital workers; wage levels; working conditions; turnover rates; work assignments; literacy levels; living conditions for live-in workers; grievance settlement and complaints; meetings held between hospital administrators and workers; walkouts and protests staged by women workers; signing of membership cards; the establishment of 1199's union headquarters; 1199's organizing activities; the hospital administration's opposition to union organizing; the hiring of foreign women workers; and the firing of Turner for union activity and her subsequent reinstatement.

Also discussed is community support for the hospital strike of 1959; worker solidarity during the organizing campaign; the segregation of black workers from white patients; language differences among hospital workers; organizing activities of hospital workers at Lenox Hill; Turner's relationship with Godoff; the strike conduct and pickets; hospital administrators' reactions to the organizing campaign; the social composition of hospital boards of trustees; Mike Quill's participation in strike activities; changes in the organizational structure of 1199 during unionization of hospitals; the training of organizers and union staff; lobbying activities for the passage of collective bargaining legislation; Godoff's personality and organizing strategy; the distribution of leaflets and dues collection; Moe Foner's contacts with the media and union public relations; union administration under the Permanent Administrative Committee; and compulsory arbitration and the no-strike pledge.

Also discussed are the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital and Beth-El Hospital (1962) strikes and their effect on passage of collective bargaining legislation; the relationship of the civil rights movement to hospital unionization; the participation of Norman Thomas, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, and Floyd Sheppard in 1199's organizing campaign; rank and file members and union leadership; 1199's political goals and organizational structure; the relationship between Drug and Hospital Division leaders; Leon Davis' role in 1199 politics; the hiring of professionals for union leadership positions; the establishment of the Guild of Professional Workers; the community of interests between white and blue collar workers; union democracy and participation of the rank and file in union policy making and politics; communication between leaders and rank and file members; health care policies and the public interest; worker morale and pride; and the training and upgrading of hospital workers.

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Données liées


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