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National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees. Series 1, Subseries 2. Drug Division staff interviews, 1976-1977.

Autore: National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees.
Edizione/Formato:   Materiale d’archivio : English
Pubblicazione:Oral history interviews, 1975-1981
Banca dati:WorldCat
Sommario:
Topics discussed include the respondents' personal backgrounds; strategies of organizing drugstores; the influence of the Drug Division on politics in the Hospital Division; working conditions in drugstores (1920-1950); the evolution of the organizational structure of 1199 (1938-1950); dues collection, strike organizing, and the establishment of dues checkoff in drugstores; the self-identification of pharmacists as
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Dettagli

Persona incaricata: Eddie Ayash; Billy Anderson; Edward Bragg; Leon J Davis; Claude Ferrara; Elliott Godoff; Milton Goldman; Phil Kamenkowitz; Bernie Katz; Morris Katz; David Kaufman; Abe Kirschner; Ted Mitchell; Karl Roth; Margaret Ryan; Floyd Sheppard; Luther Weinberg
Tipo documento: Archival Material
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees.
Numero OCLC: 64091502
In: National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees
Note: Includes interviews of four members of 1199 Drug Division staff: Claude Ferrara (delegate), Karl Roth (Bronx-Westchester area director), David Kaufman (delegate and retired pharmacist), and Phil Kamenkowitz (vice-president).
Descrizione: 4 transcripts (153 p.)

Abstract:

Topics discussed include the respondents' personal backgrounds; strategies of organizing drugstores; the influence of the Drug Division on politics in the Hospital Division; working conditions in drugstores (1920-1950); the evolution of the organizational structure of 1199 (1938-1950); dues collection, strike organizing, and the establishment of dues checkoff in drugstores; the self-identification of pharmacists as professionals; industrial vs. craft unionization in the health care industry; and typical grievances used in organizing drugstores such as wage cutting, speedup and unsanitary working conditions.

Also discussed is 1199's relationship with the Pharmacists' Union of Greater New York; the class consciousness and socialist political principles of Drug Division staff and members; political pluralism and revisionism among socialist labor leaders; economic conditions, unemployment and unionization during the Depression; WPA programs for unemployed pharmacists; the ethnic background of members of the Drugstore Union; organizing drugstore chains; benefit plans for drugstores; the conduct of pickets; rank and file leadership; the election of delegates and hospital committees; the participation of Drug Division staff in organizing; strike conduct; police interference; worker morale; the participation of women, black and Puerto Rican workers; conflict between strikers and scabs; and donations from community grocery stores.

Also discussed is the participation of Mt. Sinai Hospital pharmacists in the organization of hospital workers; information dissemination; the development of the Bronx area as a "cradle" of union support; the organizing campaign in Montefiore Hospital; strike headquarters; fines, jailings and court injunctions; the establishment of the Hospital Division; Drug Division Delegate Assembly reaction to the hospital organizing campaign; the skills of Drug Division organizers; the ethnic composition of hospital workers, including those at Mt. Sinai Hospital (1929-1954); working conditions and wages in hospitals and the exploitation of hospital workers; black and Puerto Rican leadership; and Elliott Godoff's and Ted Mitchell's leadership and organizing strategies.

The discussion also includes 1199's policy on compulsory arbitration; 1199's involvement with social politics and the political consciousness of union leaders; Elliott Godoff's contacts in the Trade Union Unity League; Leon Davis' personality and leadership ability; the leadership of Edward Ayash, Floyd Sheppard, Barrish, Edward Bragg, Phil Kamenkowitz, Abe Kirschner, Bill Anderson, Milton Goldman, Luther Weinberg, Mannie Katz, Bernie Katz, and Margaret Ryan; Godoff's contacts with 1199 (1940-1958); red-baiting of 1199 leadership; the political decision to organize hospitals and its effect on the structure and power of 1199; training and upgrading programs; the conduct of delegates' meetings and assemblies; the role of trade unions in social politics; the Guild of Professional Workers; and grievance procedure.

Topics discussed include the respondents' personal backgrounds; strategies of organizing drugstores; the influence of the Drug Division on politics in the Hospital Division; working conditions in drugstores (1920-1950); the evolution of the organizational structure of 1199 (1938-1950); dues collection, strike organizing, and the establishment of dues checkoff in drugstores; the self-identification of pharmacists as professionals; industrial vs. craft unionization in the health care industry; and typical grievances used in organizing drugstores such as wage cutting, speedup and unsanitary working conditions.

Also discussed is 1199's relationship with the Pharmacists' Union of Greater New York; the class consciousness and socialist political principles of Drug Division staff and members; political pluralism and revisionism among socialist labor leaders; economic conditions, unemployment and unionization during the Depression; WPA programs for unemployed pharmacists; the ethnic background of members of the Drugstore Union; organizing drugstore chains; benefit plans for drugstores; the conduct of pickets; rank and file leadership; the election of delegates and hospital committees; the participation of Drug Division staff in organizing; strike conduct; police interference; worker morale; the participation of women, black and Puerto Rican workers; conflict between strikers and scabs; and donations from community grocery stores.

Also discussed is the participation of Mt. Sinai Hospital pharmacists in the organization of hospital workers; information dissemination; the development of the Bronx area as a "cradle" of union support; the organizing campaign in Montefiore Hospital; strike headquarters; fines, jailings and court injunctions; the establishment of the Hospital Division; Drug Division Delegate Assembly reaction to the hospital organizing campaign; the skills of Drug Division organizers; the ethnic composition of hospital workers, including those at Mt. Sinai Hospital (1929-1954); working conditions and wages in hospitals and the exploitation of hospital workers; black and Puerto Rican leadership; and Elliott Godoff's and Ted Mitchell's leadership and organizing strategies.

The discussion also includes 1199's policy on compulsory arbitration; 1199's involvement with social politics and the political consciousness of union leaders; Elliott Godoff's contacts in the Trade Union Unity League; Leon Davis' personality and leadership ability; the leadership of Edward Ayash, Floyd Sheppard, Barrish, Edward Bragg, Phil Kamenkowitz, Abe Kirschner, Bill Anderson, Milton Goldman, Luther Weinberg, Mannie Katz, Bernie Katz, and Margaret Ryan; Godoff's contacts with 1199 (1940-1958); red-baiting of 1199 leadership; the political decision to organize hospitals and its effect on the structure and power of 1199; training and upgrading programs; the conduct of delegates' meetings and assemblies; the role of trade unions in social politics; the Guild of Professional Workers; and grievance procedure.

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