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The nature of true virtue.

Author: Jonathan Edwards
Publisher: [Ann Arbor] University of Michigan Press [1960]
Series: Ann Arbor paperbacks, AA37.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Like the great speculators Augustine, Aquinas, and Pascal, Jonathan Edwards treated religious ideas as problems not of dogma, but of life. His exploration of self-love disguised as "true virtue" is grounded in the hard facts of human behavior. More than a hell-fire preacher, more than a theologian, Edwards was a bold and independent philosopher. Nowhere is his force of mind more evident than in this book. He speaks  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Edwards, Jonathan, 1703-1758.
Nature of true virtue.
[Ann Arbor] University of Michigan Press [1960]
(OCoLC)609822207
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jonathan Edwards
OCLC Number: 373897
Description: xiii, 107 pages 21 cm.
Contents: Showing wherein the essence of true virtue consists --
Showing how that love, wherein true virtue consists, respects the Divine Being and created things --
Concerning the secondary and inferior kind of beauty --
Of self-love, and its various influence, to cause love to others, or the contrary --
Of natural conscience, and the moral sense --
Of particular instincts of nature, which in some respects resemble virtue --
The reasons why those things that have been mentioned, which have not the essence of virtue, have yet by many been mistaken for true virtue --
In what respects virtue or moral good is founded in sentiment; and how far it is founded in the reason and nature of things.
Series Title: Ann Arbor paperbacks, AA37.
Responsibility: With a foreword by William K. Frankena.

Abstract:

Like the great speculators Augustine, Aquinas, and Pascal, Jonathan Edwards treated religious ideas as problems not of dogma, but of life. His exploration of self-love disguised as "true virtue" is grounded in the hard facts of human behavior. More than a hell-fire preacher, more than a theologian, Edwards was a bold and independent philosopher. Nowhere is his force of mind more evident than in this book. He speaks as powerfully to us today as he did to the keenest minds of the eighteenth century.

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