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Nature's clocks : how scientists measure the age of almost everything

Author: J D Macdougall
Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, ©2008.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In Nature's Clocks, Doug Macdougall tells the story of scientists seeking to understand the past and shows how they arrived at the ingenious techniques they use to determine the age of objects and organisms. Focusing on radiocarbon (C-14) dating - the best-known of these methods and the only one that can directly date once-living material - and several other techniques that geologists use to decode the distant  Read more...
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Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: J D Macdougall
ISBN: 9780520249752 0520249755
OCLC Number: 181335927
Description: xi, 271 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: No vestige of a beginning ... --
Mysterious rays --
Wild Bill's quest --
Changing perceptions --
Getting the lead out --
Dating the boundaries --
Clocking evolution --
Ghostly forests and Mediterranean volcanoes --
More and more from less and less --
Appendix A : The geological time scale --
Appendix B : Periodic table of the elements --
Appendix C : Additional notes.
Responsibility: Doug Macdougall.
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Abstract:

Examining radiocarbon (C-14) dating - the best known of these methods - and several other techniques that geologists use to decode the distant past, this book unwraps the last century's advances,  Read more...

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"Rich in historical tidbits." New Scientist 20080712 "A helpful handbook on how we are now able to travel to the distant past." Publishers Weekly 20080407 "The heart of the book reveals ingenious Read more...

 
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