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Negotiating multiple identities : shame and pride among Japanese returnees

Author: Kiyoko Sueda
Publisher: Singapore : Springer, 2014.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This book uses a post-modern approach to explore how Japanese returnee students (kikokushijo) and former returnees who work in Japanese industry, negotiate multiple identities. Methodological triangulation is used to study inner perception of face, emotional state and the dynamics of negotiating multiple-layering of identities. The work considers the relationship between face and identities, and the function of the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Kiyoko Sueda
ISBN: 9789812870087 9812870083
OCLC Number: 879646104
Description: 1 online resource (xxiv, 180 pages) : illustrations (some color)
Contents: Forward.- Preface.- Table of Contents.- List of tables.- List of figures.- List of abbreviations.- Chapter 1: Multiple Identities.- 1.1: Purpose of Chapter 1.- 1.2: Identity as singular.- 1.3: Identities as plural, viewed from Symbolic Interactionism.- 1.4: Identities viewed from Social Identity Theory and Self-Categorization theory.- 1.4.1: Background of the theories.- 1.4.2: An overview of the theories.- 1.4.3: Levels of identities.- 1.4.4: The relationship between social identity and personal identity.- 1.4.5: Categories and intergroup behaviours.- 1.5: Negotiation of multiple identities.- 1.6: Summary.-References.- Chapter 2: Research on face in communication studies.- 2.1: Purpose of Chapter 2.- 2.2: The perception of face.- 2.3: Research on face in communication studies.- 2.4: The origin of face.- 2.4.1: Chinese face.- 2.4.2: Japanese face.- 2.5: Summary and implications.- References.- Chapter 3: Shame and pride behind face.- 3.1: Purpose of Chapter 3.- 3.2: Emotions in this study.- 3.2.1: Emotions and sociological theory.- 3.2.2: Emotion as a symbolic interaction.- 3.3: Face and emotions.- 3.3.1: Shame and pride.- 3.3.2: Reintegration of shame.- 3.3.3: Shame and pride illustrated in case studies.- 3.4: Research questions.- 3.4.1: Relationship between face and identities.- 3.4.2: Function of shame and pride in identity negotiation.- 3.5: Summary.- References.- Chapter 4: Japanese returnees (Kikokushijo) as a social category.- 4.1: Purpose of Chapter 4.- 4.2: Japanese returnees as a social category.- 4.2.1: 'Uniqueness' of Japanese returnees.- 4.2.2: Factors contributing to make Japanese returnees a social category.- 4.3: Overview of research on Japanese returnees.- 4.3.1: The background of kikokushijo.- 4.3.2: A historical review of research trends.- 4.4: Japanese returnees' readjustment to Japanese society.- 4.4.1: Returnees' identity and symbolic interactionism.- 4.4.2: Psychological process of readjustment.- 4.5: The public image of Japanese returnees.- 4.5.1: How returnees are viewed by their peers and teachers.- 4.5.2: How returnees are portrayed by mass media.- 4.6: Conclusion.- References.- Chapter 5: Research methodology and methods.- 5.1 Purpose of Chapter 5.- 5.2: Epistemological and methodological standing.- 5.2.1: Epistemological approach.- 5.2.2: Methodological approach.- 5.3: Methods.- 5.3.1: The methods used in the present research.- 5.3.2: The 'Who am I?' test.- 5.3.3: The PAC (Personal Attitude Construct) method.- 5.3.4: Participant observation.- 5.4: The research participants and procedures.- 5.4.1: The participants in the research.- 5.4.2: The research procedures.- 5.5: The ethical issues concerned.- References.- Chapter 6: Results (The 1st phase of research): Japanese returnees at university.- 6.1: Purpose of Chapter 6.- 6.2: The first phase of research.- 6.2.1: The participants.- 6.2.2: The format of the report.- 6.3: Participant A.- 6.3.1: The WAI and the PAC: A as a Japanese.- 6.3.2: Analysis from the interview with #A.- 6.3.3: Participant observation.- 6.3.4: Conclusion.- 6.4: Participant B.- 6.4.1: The WAI and the PAC: #B as kuroko.- 6.4.2: Analysis from the interview with #B.- 6.4.3: Participant observation.- 6.4.4: Conclusion.- 6.5: Participant C.- 6.5.1: The WAI and the PAC: #C as #C.- 6.5.2: Analysis from the interview with #C.- 6.5.3: Participant observation.- 6.5.4: Conclusion.- 6.6: Conclusion.- References.- Chapter 7: Results (The 2nd phase of research): Japanese former returnees in industry.- 7.1: Purpose of Chapter 7.- 7.2: Research Process.- 7.2.1: Research period and the participants of the second phase of research.- 7.2.2: Research methods and the format of the report.- 7.3: Participant #C.- 7.3.1: Profile of participant #C.- 7.3.2: Semi-structured interview.- 7.4: Participant #D.- 7.4.1: The WAI and the PAC: A as Japanese.- 7.4.2: Analysis from the interview with #D.- 7.4.3: Participant observation.- 7.4.4: Conclusion.- 7.5: Participant #E.- 7.5.1: The WAI and the PAC: A as a new student.- 7.5.2: Analysis from the interview with #E.- 7.5.3: Participant observation.- 7.5.4: Conclusion.- 7.5.5: The follow-up interview.- 7.6: Participant #F.- 7.6.1: The WAI and the PAC: A as a woman.- 7.6.2: Analysis from the interview with #F.- 7.6.3: Participant observation.- 7.6.4: Conclusion.- 7.7: Conclusion.- References.- Chapter 8: Face (mentsu), shame and pride in identity negotiation.- 8.1: Purpose of Chapter 8.- 8.2: Analysis of the results of the research.- 8.2.1: Threatened face (mentsu) and reinforcement of identities.- 8.2.2: Threatened face and bypassed shame.- 8.2.3: Absence of shame and identity.- 8.2.4: English as a symbol and identity.- 8.2.5: Concern for the other's shame.- 8.2.6: Wiping off shame and restoring pride.- 8.2.7: Co-existing face needs and their interactions.- 8.3 Conclusion.- 8.3.1: The role of shame and pride in negotiating multiple identities.- 8.3.2: The relationship between face and identities.- 8.3.3: Co-existence of multiple face needs and the interactions among them.- 8.3.4: English as a symbol of returnees and former returnees.- 8.3.5: Methodological contribution.- 8.4: Further work.- 8.5: Summary.- References.- Subject index
Responsibility: Kiyoko Sueda.
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