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Networked machinists : high-technology industries in Antebellum America

Author: David R Meyer
Publisher: Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006.
Series: Johns Hopkins studies in the history of technology.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"A century and a half before the modern information technology revolution, machinists in the eastern United States created the nation's first high technology industries. In iron foundries and steam-engine works, locomotive works, machine and tool shops, textile-machinery firms, and firearms manufacturers, these resourceful workers pioneered the practice of dispersing technological expertise through communities of  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David R Meyer
ISBN: 0801884713 9780801884719
OCLC Number: 65340979
Description: x, 311 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Contents: Introduction: Machinists' traces --
I: The formation of the networks, 1790-1820 --
Iron foundries become early hubs of machinist networks --
A networked community built by cotton textile machinists --
The Federal armories and private firearms firms operate in open networks --
II: the elaboration of the networks, 1820-1860 --
Iron foundries rule the heavy capital equipment industry --
Networked machinists build locomotives --
Resilient cotton textile machinist networks --
The cradles of the metalworking machinery industry --
Machine tool networks --
Machinists' networks forge the pivotal producer durables industry.
Series Title: Johns Hopkins studies in the history of technology.
Responsibility: David R. Meyer.
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Abstract:

Examines the development of skilled-labor exchange systems, showing how individual metalworking sectors grew and moved outward. This work argues that the networked behavior of machinists within and  Read more...

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This study contains a wealth of information and surprises. Choice 2007 An excellent, up-to-date, synthetic volume with strong themes and evidence. -- Ross Thomson EH.Net 2007 An excellent synthesis Read more...

 
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schema:description""A century and a half before the modern information technology revolution, machinists in the eastern United States created the nation's first high technology industries. In iron foundries and steam-engine works, locomotive works, machine and tool shops, textile-machinery firms, and firearms manufacturers, these resourceful workers pioneered the practice of dispersing technological expertise through communities of practice. In the first book to study this phenomenon since the 1916 classic, English and American Tool Builders, David R. Meyer examines the development of skilled-labor exchange systems, showing how individual metalworking sectors grew and moved outward. He argues that the networked behavior of machinists within and across industries helps explain the rapid transformation of metalworking industries during the antebellum period, building a foundation for the sophisticated, mass production/consumer industries that figured so prominently in the later U.S. economy."--Publisher's website."@en
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