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The new global economy and developing countries : making openness work

Author: Dani Rodrik
Publisher: Washington, DC : Overseas Development Council ; Baltimore, MD : Distributed by Johns Hopkins University Press, ©1999.
Series: Policy essay, no. 24.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Policymakers in the developing world are grappling with new dilemmas created by openness to trade and capital flows. What role, if any, remains for the state in promoting industrialization? Does openness worsen inequality, and if so, what can be done about it? What is the best way to handle turbulence from the world economy, especially the fickleness of international capital flows? In this study, Dani Rodrik argues  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Rodrik, Dani.
New global economy and developing countries.
Washington, DC : Overseas Development Council ; Baltimore, MD : Distributed by Johns Hopkins University Press, ©1999
(OCoLC)647068394
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Dani Rodrik
ISBN: 156517027X 9781565170278
OCLC Number: 40521286
Description: x, 168 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Series Title: Policy essay, no. 24.
Other Titles: Making openness work
Responsibility: Dani Rodrik.
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Abstract:

"Policymakers in the developing world are grappling with new dilemmas created by openness to trade and capital flows. What role, if any, remains for the state in promoting industrialization? Does openness worsen inequality, and if so, what can be done about it? What is the best way to handle turbulence from the world economy, especially the fickleness of international capital flows? In this study, Dani Rodrik argues that successful integration into the world economy requires a complementary set of policies and institutions at home. Policymakers must reinforce their external strategy of liberalization with an internal strategy that gives the state substantial responsibility in building physical and human capital and mediating social conflicts."--Jacket.

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