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The new science of Giambattista Vico.

Author: Giambattista Vico
Publisher: Ithaca, N.Y., Cornell University Press [1968]
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : Rev. translation of the 3d ed. (1774View all editions and formats
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Genre/Form: Ouvrages avant 1800
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Giambattista Vico
OCLC Number: 933689
Notes: Translation of Principj di una scienza nuova.
Description: xiv, 441 pages illustrations 24 cm
Contents: Principles of new science of Giambattista Vico concerning the common nature of the nations --
Idea of the work --
Frontispiece --
Explanation of the picture placed as a frontispiece to serve as introduction to the work --
Book one: establishment of principles --
Chronological table --
Section I: notes on the chronological table, in which the materials are set in order --
Section II: elements --
Section III: principles --
Section IV: method --
Book two: poetic wisdom --
Prolegomena --
Introduction --
Chapter 1: wisdom in general --
Chapter 2: exposition and division of poetic wisdom --
Chapter 3: the universal flood and the giants --
Section I: poetic metaphysics --
Chapter 1: Poetic metaphysics as the origin of poetry, idolatry divination, and sacrifices --
Chapter 2: corollaries concerning the principal aspects of this science --
Section II: poetic logic --
Chapter 1: poetic logic --
Chapter 2: corollaries concerning poetic tropes, monsters and metamorphoses --
Chapter 3: corollaries concerning speech by poetic characters among the first nations --
Chapter 4: corollaries concerning the origins of languages and letters; and therein, the origins of hieroglyphics, laws, names, family arms, medals, and money; and hence of the first language and literature of the natural law of the Gentes --
Chapter 5: corollaries concerning the origins of poetic style, digression, inversion, rhythm, song, and verse --
Chapter 6: the other corollaries announce at the beginning (of chapter 4) --
Chapter 7: final corollaries concerning the logic of the learned --
Section III: poetic morals --
Chapter 1: Poetic morals and the origins of the vulgar virtues taught by religion through the institution of matrimony --
Section IV: poetic economy --
Chapter 1: Of poetic economy, and here of the families which at first included only children (and not famuli) --
Chapter 2: the families with their famuli, which preceded the cities, and without which the cities could not have been born --
Chapter 3: corollaries concerning contracts sealed by simple consent --
Chapter 4: mythological cannon --
Section V: Poetic politics --
Chapter 1: poetic politics, under which the first commonwealths in the world were born in a most severely aristocratic form --
Chapter 2: all commonwealths are born from certain eternal principles of fiefs --
Chapter 3: the origins of the census and the treasury --
Chapter 4: the origins of the Roman assemblies --
Chapter 5: corollary: it is divine providence that institutes commonwealths and at the same time the natural law of the gentes --
Chapter 6: heroic politics resumed --
Chapter 7: corollaries concerning ancient Roman institutions, and in particular the supposedly monarchic kingship at Rome and the supposedly popular liberty instituted by Junius Brutus --
Chapter 8: Corollary concerning the heroism of the first peoples --
Section VI --
Chapter 1: Epitomes of poetic history --
Section VII: Poetic physics --
Chapter 1: Poetic physics --
Chapter 2: Poetic physics concerning man, or heroic nature --
Chapter 3: Corollary on heroic sentences --
Chapter 4: Corollary on heroic descriptions --
Chapter 5: Corollary on heroic customs --
Section VIII --
Chapter 1: Poetic cosmography --
Section IX: Poetic astronomy --
Chapter 1: Poetic astronomy --
Chapter 2: Astronomical and physic-philological demonstration of the uniformity of the principles [of astronomy] among all gentile nations --
Section X: Poetic chronology --
Chapter 1: Poetic chronology --
Chapter 2: Chronological canon for determining the beginnings of universal history, which must precede the monarchy of ninus, with which it [commonly] starts Section XI: Poetic geography --
Chapter 1: Poetic geography --
Chapter 2: Corollary on the coming of Aeneas into Italy --
Chapter 3: The denomination and description of the heroic cities --
Book three: Discovery of the true Homer --
Section I: Search for the true Homer --
Chapter 1: The esoteric wisdom attributed to Homer --
Chapter 2: Homer's fatherland --
Chapter 3: The age of Homer --
Chapter 4: Homer's matchless faculty for Heroic poetry --
Chapter 5: Philosophical proofs for the discovery of the true Homer --
Chapter 6: Philological proofs for the discovery of the true Homer --
Section II: Discovery of the true Homer --
Chapter 1: The improprieties and improbabilities of the Homer hitherto believed in become proper and necessary in the Homer herein discovered --
Chapter 2: The poems of Homer revealed as two great treasure stores of the natural law of the gentes of Greece --
Appendix: Rational history of the dramatic and lyric poets --
Book four: The course the nations run --
Section I: Three kinds of natures --
Section II: Three kinds of customs --
Section III: Three kinds of natural law --
Section IV: Three kinds of governments --
Section V: Three kinds of languages --
Section VI: Three kinds of characters --
Section VII: Three kinds of jurisprudence --
Section VIII: Three kinds of authority --
Section IX: Three kinds of reason --
Chapter 1: Divine reason and reason of state --
Chapter 2: Corollary on the political wisdom of the ancient Romans --
Chapter 3: Corollary: fundamental history of Roman law --
Section X: Three kinds of judgments --
Chapter 1: First kind: divine judgments --
Chapter 2: Corollary on duels and reprisals --
Chapter 3: Second kind: ordinary judgments --
Chapter 4: Third kind: human judgments --
Section XI: Three sects of times --
Chapter 1: Sects of religious, punctilious, and civil times --
Section XII: Other proofs drawn from the properties of the heroic aristocracies --
Chapter 1: The guarding of the confines --
Chapter 2: The guarding of the institutions --
Chapter 3: The guarding of the laws --
Section XIII --
Chapter 1: Other proofs taken from [mixed commonwealths, that is from] the tempering of the constitution of a succeeding commonwealth by the administration of the preceding one --
Chapter 2: An eternal natural royal law by which the nations come to rest under monarchies --
Chapter 3: Refutation of the principles of political theory as represented by the system of Jean Bodin --
Section XIV: Final proofs to confirm the course of nations --
Chapter 1: Punishments, wars, order of numbers --
Chapter II: Corollary: that the ancient Roman law was a serious poem, and the ancient jurisprudence a severe kind of poetry, within which are found the first outlines of legal metaphysics in the rough; and how, among the Greeks, philosophy was born of the laws --
Book five: The recourse of human institutions which the nations take when they rise again --
Chapter 1: The latest barbaric history explained as the recourse of the first barbaric history --
Chapter 2: The recourse the nations take over the eternal nature of fiefs, and the recourse thence of ancient Roman law in feudal law --
Chapter 3: Survey of the ancient and the modern world of nations in the lights of the principles of this science --
Conclusion of the work --
On an eternal natural commonwealth, in each kind best, ordained by divine providence.
Other Titles: Principi di una scienza nuova.

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schema:description"Principles of new science of Giambattista Vico concerning the common nature of the nations -- Idea of the work -- Frontispiece -- Explanation of the picture placed as a frontispiece to serve as introduction to the work -- Book one: establishment of principles -- Chronological table -- Section I: notes on the chronological table, in which the materials are set in order -- Section II: elements -- Section III: principles -- Section IV: method -- Book two: poetic wisdom -- Prolegomena -- Introduction -- Chapter 1: wisdom in general -- Chapter 2: exposition and division of poetic wisdom -- Chapter 3: the universal flood and the giants -- Section I: poetic metaphysics -- Chapter 1: Poetic metaphysics as the origin of poetry, idolatry divination, and sacrifices -- Chapter 2: corollaries concerning the principal aspects of this science -- Section II: poetic logic -- Chapter 1: poetic logic -- Chapter 2: corollaries concerning poetic tropes, monsters and metamorphoses -- Chapter 3: corollaries concerning speech by poetic characters among the first nations -- Chapter 4: corollaries concerning the origins of languages and letters; and therein, the origins of hieroglyphics, laws, names, family arms, medals, and money; and hence of the first language and literature of the natural law of the Gentes -- Chapter 5: corollaries concerning the origins of poetic style, digression, inversion, rhythm, song, and verse -- Chapter 6: the other corollaries announce at the beginning (of chapter 4) -- Chapter 7: final corollaries concerning the logic of the learned -- Section III: poetic morals -- Chapter 1: Poetic morals and the origins of the vulgar virtues taught by religion through the institution of matrimony -- Section IV: poetic economy -- Chapter 1: Of poetic economy, and here of the families which at first included only children (and not famuli) -- Chapter 2: the families with their famuli, which preceded the cities, and without which the cities could not have been born -- Chapter 3: corollaries concerning contracts sealed by simple consent -- Chapter 4: mythological cannon -- Section V: Poetic politics -- Chapter 1: poetic politics, under which the first commonwealths in the world were born in a most severely aristocratic form -- Chapter 2: all commonwealths are born from certain eternal principles of fiefs -- Chapter 3: the origins of the census and the treasury -- Chapter 4: the origins of the Roman assemblies -- Chapter 5: corollary: it is divine providence that institutes commonwealths and at the same time the natural law of the gentes -- Chapter 6: heroic politics resumed -- Chapter 7: corollaries concerning ancient Roman institutions, and in particular the supposedly monarchic kingship at Rome and the supposedly popular liberty instituted by Junius Brutus -- Chapter 8: Corollary concerning the heroism of the first peoples -- Section VI -- Chapter 1: Epitomes of poetic history -- Section VII: Poetic physics -- Chapter 1: Poetic physics -- Chapter 2: Poetic physics concerning man, or heroic nature -- Chapter 3: Corollary on heroic sentences -- Chapter 4: Corollary on heroic descriptions -- Chapter 5: Corollary on heroic customs -- Section VIII -- Chapter 1: Poetic cosmography -- Section IX: Poetic astronomy -- Chapter 1: Poetic astronomy -- Chapter 2: Astronomical and physic-philological demonstration of the uniformity of the principles [of astronomy] among all gentile nations -- Section X: Poetic chronology -- Chapter 1: Poetic chronology -- Chapter 2: Chronological canon for determining the beginnings of universal history, which must precede the monarchy of ninus, with which it [commonly] starts"@en
schema:description"Section XI: Poetic geography -- Chapter 1: Poetic geography -- Chapter 2: Corollary on the coming of Aeneas into Italy -- Chapter 3: The denomination and description of the heroic cities -- Book three: Discovery of the true Homer -- Section I: Search for the true Homer -- Chapter 1: The esoteric wisdom attributed to Homer -- Chapter 2: Homer's fatherland -- Chapter 3: The age of Homer -- Chapter 4: Homer's matchless faculty for Heroic poetry -- Chapter 5: Philosophical proofs for the discovery of the true Homer -- Chapter 6: Philological proofs for the discovery of the true Homer -- Section II: Discovery of the true Homer -- Chapter 1: The improprieties and improbabilities of the Homer hitherto believed in become proper and necessary in the Homer herein discovered -- Chapter 2: The poems of Homer revealed as two great treasure stores of the natural law of the gentes of Greece -- Appendix: Rational history of the dramatic and lyric poets -- Book four: The course the nations run -- Section I: Three kinds of natures -- Section II: Three kinds of customs -- Section III: Three kinds of natural law -- Section IV: Three kinds of governments -- Section V: Three kinds of languages -- Section VI: Three kinds of characters -- Section VII: Three kinds of jurisprudence -- Section VIII: Three kinds of authority -- Section IX: Three kinds of reason -- Chapter 1: Divine reason and reason of state -- Chapter 2: Corollary on the political wisdom of the ancient Romans -- Chapter 3: Corollary: fundamental history of Roman law -- Section X: Three kinds of judgments -- Chapter 1: First kind: divine judgments -- Chapter 2: Corollary on duels and reprisals -- Chapter 3: Second kind: ordinary judgments -- Chapter 4: Third kind: human judgments -- Section XI: Three sects of times -- Chapter 1: Sects of religious, punctilious, and civil times -- Section XII: Other proofs drawn from the properties of the heroic aristocracies -- Chapter 1: The guarding of the confines -- Chapter 2: The guarding of the institutions -- Chapter 3: The guarding of the laws -- Section XIII -- Chapter 1: Other proofs taken from [mixed commonwealths, that is from] the tempering of the constitution of a succeeding commonwealth by the administration of the preceding one -- Chapter 2: An eternal natural royal law by which the nations come to rest under monarchies -- Chapter 3: Refutation of the principles of political theory as represented by the system of Jean Bodin -- Section XIV: Final proofs to confirm the course of nations -- Chapter 1: Punishments, wars, order of numbers -- Chapter II: Corollary: that the ancient Roman law was a serious poem, and the ancient jurisprudence a severe kind of poetry, within which are found the first outlines of legal metaphysics in the rough; and how, among the Greeks, philosophy was born of the laws -- Book five: The recourse of human institutions which the nations take when they rise again -- Chapter 1: The latest barbaric history explained as the recourse of the first barbaric history -- Chapter 2: The recourse the nations take over the eternal nature of fiefs, and the recourse thence of ancient Roman law in feudal law -- Chapter 3: Survey of the ancient and the modern world of nations in the lights of the principles of this science -- Conclusion of the work -- On an eternal natural commonwealth, in each kind best, ordained by divine providence."@en
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