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A New treasury of poetry

Author: Neil Philip; John Lawrence
Publisher: New York : Stewart, Tabori & Chang : Distributed in the U.S. by Workman Pub., 1990.
Edition/Format:   Book : Juvenile audience : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A celebration of English verse. Includes poems by William Blake, Christopher Smart, Robert Louis Stevenson, Christina Rossetti, Walter de la Mare, Eleanor Farjeon, Ted Hughes, Charles Causley, and many others.
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Material Type: Juvenile audience
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Neil Philip; John Lawrence
ISBN: 1556701454 9781556701450
OCLC Number: 20828184
Notes: "An Albion book"--Title page verso.
Description: 256 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
Contents: "There was a child went forth"; Whitman --
Yankee Doodle; Traditional --
Grace at Kirkudbright; Burns --
Infant joy; Blake --
Another grace for a child; Herrick --
Morning song; Plath --
I see a bear; Hughes --
Here comes a lusty wooer; Traditional --
Baby-sitting; Clarke --
The mirror; Graves --
"Lavender's blue"; Traditional --
"I know where I'm going"; Traditional --
My young man's a cornishman; Causley --
Henry and Mary; Graves --
I am cherry alive; Schwartz --
To mistress Margaret Hussey; Skelton --
The shade-catchers; Mew --
Where go the boats?; Stevenson --
Above the dock; Hulme --
Full moon; Sackville-West --
Full moon and little Frieda; Hughes --
First travels of Max; Crowe Ransom --
The centaur; Swenson --
The collar-bone of a hare; Yeats --
We real cool; Brooks --
The brothers; Muir --
Alone; Poe --
Nursery rhyme of innocence and experience; Causley --
"I remember, I remember ... ; Hood --
I remember, I remember; Larkin --
Fern Hill; Thomas --
Soap suds; MacNeice --
"Sing me a song of a lad that is gone"; Stevenson --
Eden rock; Causley --
Apple blossom; MacNeice --
Days; Larkin --
Beachcomber; Brown --
The character of a happy life; Wotton --
"Were I a king ... "; Edward --
A child's laughter; Swinburne --
Running to paradise; Yeats --
William I; Farjeon --
The looking-glass; Kipling --
"When I was fair and young ... "; Queen Elizabeth I --
Impromptu on Charles II; Wilmot --
On Prince Frederick; Anon. --
"I'm nobody! Who are you?; Dickinson --
The frog prince; Smith --
Two wedding songs; Heath-Stubbs --
Vain and careless; Graves --
Cushie Butterfield; RIdley --
The water is wide; Traditional --
A red, red rose; Burns --
Ballad of an old woman; Collymore --
A song about myself; Keats --
How pleasant to know Mr. Lear; Lear --
Lines for Cuscuscaraway and Mirza Murad Ali Beg; Eliot --
from A song of myself; Whitman --
On his seventy-fifth birthday; Landor --
"The art of biography"; Bentley --
Poem for a dead poet; McGough --
Saint Francis and the birds; Heaney --
Love without hope; Graves --
Walking song; Gurney --
Afternoon tea; Mew --
"One leg ... "; Traditional. Wishes of an elderly man; Raleigh --
House fear; Frost --
This is just to say; Williams --
Poem at thirty; Sanchez --
A recollection; Cornford --
A consumer's report; Porter --
"The laws of god, the laws of man"; Housman --
Song: Lift-boy; Graves --
The history of the flood; Stubbs --
The lover whose mistress feared a mouse, declareth that he would become a cat, if he might have his desire; Turberville --
from Jubilate Agno; Smart --
The rum tum tugger; Eliot --
On the death of a mad dog; Goldsmith --
The cat; Hares at play; Clare --
The oyster; Traditional --
Fish; Ross --
The fish; Bishop --
To a fish/ A fish replies/ The fish turns into a man, and then into a spirit, and again speaks; Hunt --
To a butterfly; Wordsworth --
Answer to a child's question; Coleridge --
Allie; Graves --
Little Trotty Wagtail; Clare --
Robin Redbreast's testament; Traditional; "Repeat that, repeat"; Hopkins --
On the cuckoo; Quarles --
Wiltshire downs; Young --
The eagle; Tennyson --
The fowler; Gibson --
Michaels' song; Gibson --
"A narrow fellow in the grass"; Dickinson --
Snake; Lawrence --
Lizard; Lawrence --
The bull moose; Nowlan --
The tyger; Blake --
The thought-fox; Hughes --
A noiseless patient spider; Whitman --
"Yesterday he was nowhere to be found"; Hughes --
Poor old horse; Traditional --
Sheep; Davies --
Milking before dawn; Dallas --
Cows; Reeves --
The oxen; Hardy. Autumn fires; Stevenson --
"Bread and milk for breakfast"; Rossetti --
Cuckoo song; Kipling --
"Dear March--Come in--"; Dickinson --
In the fields; Mew --
Spring; Blake --
The trees are down; Mew --
Domus Caedet Arborem; Mew --
"The lopped tree in time may grow again"; Southwell --
"Loveliest of trees, the cherry now"; Housman --
The daffodils; Wordsworth --
The wheat ripening; Clare --
Day-dreams; Canton --
Heat; Lampman --
Pods pop and grin; Berry --
Cut grass; Larkin --
"Blazing in gold"; Dickinson --
"The sun and fog contested"; Dickinson --
The rainbow; Traditional --
Autumn; Hulme --
Weathers; Hardy --
To autumn; Keats --
Beechwoods at Knole; Sackville-West --
Wild iron; Curnow --
Windy nights; Stevenson --
"Who has seen the wind?"; Rossetti --
The storm; de la Mare --
Windy gap; Campbell --
Address to a child during a boisterous winter evening; Wordsworth --
"O thought I!"; Wordsworth --
The high hills; Gurney --
"An October robin ... "; Hughes --
"Please to remember"; de la Mare --
"There's a certain slant of light"; Dickinson --
Snow; Thomas --
Now winter nights enlarge; Campion --
Stopping by woods on a snowy evening; Frost --
Thaw; Thomas --
Sudden thaw; Young --
Song by an old shepherd; Blake --
Snow falling; Hughes --
Christmas song; Traditional --
Warning to children; Graves --
Leisure; Davies --
"A thing of beauty is a joy for ever"; Keats --
Cock-crow; Thomas --
The lake isle of Innisfree; Yeats --
Prophecy; Wylie --
"White in the moon ... "; Housman --
"Before the beginning of years"; Swinburne --
"I thank You God ... "; Cummings --
Pied beauty; Hopkins --
"Cities and thrones and powers"; Kipling --
Ozymandias; Shelley --
"Even such is time ... "; Raleigh --
"A word is dead"; Dickinson --
"He who binds to himself a joy" Blake --
Fantasy of an african boy; Berry --
Hunger; Binyon --
Abou Ben Adhem; Hunt --
Song; Clare --
A poison tree; Blake --
"Dont-care didn't care"; Traditional --
Anger's freeing power; Smith --
The jeely piece song; McNaughtan --
The glog-hole; MacDiarmid --
"I, too, sing America"; Hughes --
None is the same as another; Smith. As you came from the Holy land; Raleigh --
The beautiful; Davies --
The road not taken; Frost --
This is the key; Traditional --
"The brain--
is wider that the sky--"; Dickinson --
Generations; Gurney --
Merlin and the gleam; Tennyson --
The rainbow; Lawrence --
The rainbow; de la Mare --
"My heart leaps up"; Wordsworth --
"the child is father to the man"; Hopkins --
"What are heavy?"; Rossetti --
"Say not the struggle nought availeth ... "; Clough --
"In this short life"; Dickinson --
Personal; Hughes --
"Where lies the land ... "; Clough --
I am the great sun; Causley --
"I took one draught of life--"; Dickinson --
from Auguries of innocence; Blake --
The cataract of Lodore; Southey --
The war song of Dinas Vawr; Peacock --
Roman wall blues; Auden --
The wishing-well; Gibson --
The ballad of Agincourt; Drayton --
A smuggler's song; Kipling --
The burial of Sir John More at Corunna; Wolfe --
To his love; Gurney --
Morse --
Murray --
The highwayman; Noyes --
The listeners; de la Mare --
The way through the woods; Kipling --
The magpies; Glover --
The outlaw of Lock Lene; Callanan --
La belle dame Sans Merci; Keats --
"Her strong enchantments failing"; Housman --
Richard Cory; Robinson --
Lord Randal; Traditional --
Frankie and Johnny; Traditional --
The Douglas tragedy; Traditional --
Young Lochinvar; Scott --
Our ship she lies in harbour; Traditional --
The forsaken merman; Arnold --
Song of the galley-slaves; Kipling --
The land of Whipperginny; Graves --
Boomerang; Hart-Smith --
Invocation; MacNeice --
"Shake off our heavy trance"; Beaumont --
John Connu Rider; Salkey --
The song of wandering aengus; Yeats --
I saw a peacock; Traditional --
"How many miles to Babylon?"; Traditional --
Romance; Turner --
Eldorado; Poe --
Loving mad Tom; Anon. --
Bunches of grapes; de la Mare --
"Three plum buns"; Rossetti --
Dawlish fair; Keats --
King Arthur; Traditional --
"Amid the derringers I ride"; Blishen --
The Yule days; Traditional --
Legend; Wright --
The derby ram; Traditional --
Ariel's song; Shakespeare --
The song of the mad prince; de la Mare --
Figgie Hobin; Causley. Calico pie; Lear --
How to make a sailor's pie; Aiken --
Grey goose and gander; Traditional --
Sea-marge; Gurney --
"Ferry me across the water"; Rossetti --
The silver penny; de la Mare --
"I had a little nut-tree"; Traditional --
The owl and hte pussy-cat; Lear --
"Lean out of the window"; Joyce --
"I give you the end of a golden string"; Blake --
Good night; Farjeon --
A lyke-wake dirge; Traditional --
A nightmare; Gilbert --
The sea; Reeves --
Slowly; Reeves --
Twilight time; Palmer --
Samuel Palmer's coming from evening church: Causley --
The echoing green; Blake --
The morning watch; Vaughan --
The shepherd boy's song; Bunyan --
The tide in the river; Farjeon --
the songs I had; Gurney --
A vision; Clare --
Sea-fever; Masefield --
Up-hill; Rossetti --
Requiem; Stevenson --
A baby-sermon; Macdonald --
Lines for a bed at Kelmscott Manor; Morris --
Time to go home; Reeves --
A night-herding song; Stephens --
The cottager to her infant; Wordsworth --
Weep you no more, sad fountains; Anon. --
Sephestia's song; Greene --
My papa's waltz; Roethke --
Grampa; Scott --
The city of sleep; Kipling --
After apple-picking; Frost --
Pleasant sounds; Clare --
A spell for sleeping; Reid --
"Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John"; Traditional --
A clear midnight; Whitman.
Responsibility: selected and introduced by Neil Philip ; illustrated by John Lawrence.

Abstract:

This collection which features 288 poems by such writers as Emily Dickinson, e.e. cummings, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ted Hughes, Walt Whitman and William Blake, is organized around themes  Read more...

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