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Nickel and dimed : on (not) getting by in America

Author: Barbara Ehrenreich
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Millions of Americans work full-time, year-round, for poverty-level wages. In 1998, [the author of this book] decided to join them. She was inspired in part by the rhetoric surrounding welfare reform, which promised that a job - any job - could be the ticket to a better life. But how does anyone survive, let alone prosper, on six to seven dollars an hour? To find out, [she] left her home, took the cheapest lodgings  Read more...
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Material Type: Biography, Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Barbara Ehrenreich
OCLC Number: 52479161
Notes: Originally published: New York : Henry Holt and Company, c2001. 1st ed.
"Metropolitan Books."
Description: 1 sound disc : digital, mono. ; 4 3/4 in.
Contents: Getting ready --
Serving in Florida --
Scrubbing in Maine --
Selling in Minnesota --
Evaluation.
Responsibility: Barbara Ehrenreich.

Abstract:

Millions of Americans work full-time, year-round, for poverty-level wages. In 1998, [the author of this book] decided to join them. She was inspired in part by the rhetoric surrounding welfare reform, which promised that a job - any job - could be the ticket to a better life. But how does anyone survive, let alone prosper, on six to seven dollars an hour? To find out, [she] left her home, took the cheapest lodgings she could find, and accepted whatever jobs she was offered as a woefully inexperienced homemaker returning to the workforce. So began a grueling, hair raising, and darkly funny odyssey through the underside of working America. Moving from Florida to Maine to Minnesota, [she] worked as a waitress, a hotel maid, a cleaning woman, a nursing home aide, and a Wal-Mart sales clerk. Very quickly, she discovered that no job is truly "unskilled," that even the lowliest occupations require exhausting mental and muscular effort. She also learned that one job is not enough; you need at least two if you intend to live indoors. [The book] reveals low-wage America in all its tenacity, anxiety, surprising generosity.-Dust jacket.

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