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No contest : the case against competition

Author: Alfie Kohn
Publisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin, ©1992.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : Rev. edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Competition may be as American as apple pie, but social scientist Alfie Kohn argues that our struggle to defeat one another--at work, at school, at play, and at home--turns all of us into losers. Contrary to the myths with which we have been raised, Kohn shows that competition is not an inevitable part of human nature. It does not motivate us to do our best. Rather than building character, competition sabotages  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Alfie Kohn
ISBN: 0395631254 9780395631256
OCLC Number: 26255272
Description: ix, 324 pages ; 21 cm
Contents: The "number one" obsession --
Is competition inevitable? : the "human nature" myth --
Is competition more productive? : the rewards of working together --
Is competition more enjoyable? : on sports, play, and fun --
Does competition build character? : psychological considerations --
Against each other : interpersonal considerations --
The logic of playing dirty --
Women and competition --
Beyond competition : thoughts on making change --
Learning together.
Responsibility: Alfie Kohn.
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Abstract:

Competition may be as American as apple pie, but social scientist Alfie Kohn argues that our struggle to defeat one another--at work, at school, at play, and at home--turns all of us into losers. Contrary to the myths with which we have been raised, Kohn shows that competition is not an inevitable part of human nature. It does not motivate us to do our best. Rather than building character, competition sabotages self-esteem and ruins relationships. Kohn argues that we need to restructure our institutions so that one person's success does not depend on another's failure. For this revised edition, he adds a detailed account of how students can learn more effectively by working cooperatively in the classroom instead of struggling to be Number One.--From publisher description.

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by bnewman8 (WorldCat user published 2007-05-29) Very Good Permalink
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