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No continuing city : the story of a missiologist from colonial to postcolonial times

Autor: Alan R Tippett; Doug Priest; Charles H Kraft
Editorial: Pasadena, CA : William Carey Library, [2013]
Serie: Missiology of Alan R. Tippett series.
Edición/Formato:   Print book : Biografía : Inglés (eng)
Base de datos:WorldCat
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Detalles

Género/Forma: Biography
Persona designada: Alan R Tippett; Alan R Tippett
Tipo de material: Biografía
Tipo de documento: Libro/Texto
Todos autores / colaboradores: Alan R Tippett; Doug Priest; Charles H Kraft
ISBN: 9780878084784 0878084789
Número OCLC: 853664466
Descripción: xvi, 562 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
Contenido: 1. In which my great-grandfather John Tippett leaves his ancestral home, Cornwall, and comes to Jim Crow --
2. In which we bring together the key personnel of this record and come to the little house where I was born --
3. In which the drama opens, I discover man's unfriendliness to fellow man, the presence of my father as a person, and my family as a refuge --
4. In which some plain truths about school teachers are exposed and I get my first felt hat --
5. In which I discover the city life, explore it, adopt it, and then turn my back on it --
6. In which I go to the university, annoy my professor, attend a heresy trial, and train for the ministry --
7. In which I go to old, historical mining town; start working on an apple orchard; and buy a diamond ring --
8. In which after living through the Depression in "a dry and thirsty land where no water is," I am transported to "green fields and pastures new" --
9. In which I have a bird's eye view of Bass Strait, visit the "graveyard of lost ships," link up with a scientific expedition, make a collection of subrecent animal bones, and begin mounting biting lice on microscope slides, and finally make an appointment at a church --
10. In which, after some intense reflection, I present myself as a candidate for ordination as a Christian minister --
11. In which, after a rhapsody of Blue Lake and Fairy Cave, the wolf comes to the door --
12. In which I record, virtually verbatim as I wrote it about a year after the event, the account of my father's passing, which, in a way, was a watershed in my own story 13. In which I note the effect of the war in Europe on a rural town in the wheat belt of Victoria, mark time there while awaiting our appointment to the islands, and take a brief holiday to Kangaroo Island --
14. In which I terminate Book I, having spent my first thirty years in Australia, and depart thence for my island palms and an entirely new lifestyle --
15. In which I am pitchforked into a prewar colonial mission, and I outline my initial problems, language learning, and other pursuits of a new missionary down to his first synod --
16. In which I penetrate the mountainous interior of Colo West, and discover myself but one short step from the Old Testament world --
17. In which I visit my island circuit sections (Vatulele and the Malolo and Mamanucu groups), we go as a family to Suva for our first district synod, the war begins in the Pacific, and I have my first responses to preaching in Fijian --
18. In which I talk about Nadroga under New Zealand and American occupation during World War II as seen through the eyes of a missionary --
19. In which we transfer from Cuvu, Nadroga, to Richmond, Kadavu, and the years of war come to an end --
20. In which I depict life on a rural island mission school compound with a policy change from foreign paternalism to functional rural relevance, and we entertain His Excellency the Governor --
21. In which I discuss village itineration in Kadavu, its place in ministerial formation, and the fellowship of the road --
22. In which we discuss the new constitution of the Fijian church and our first furlough --
23. In which I take up my position as the principal of the Bible School, a Fijian attempt to combat colonial paternalism and raise the levels of church life and ministry --
24. In which I find myself alternatively in the urban jungle and the garden of the Lord --
25. In which, as acting chairman, I encounter a hurricane, a dispute with the government, and a fire --
26. In which I dwell in chiefly Bau and ask what a Christian ministry is in context of custom --
27. In which I describe the mission to Fiji and its extension through my division --
28. In which I consider the mountains and forests as the habitation of demons and yet also as a presence of God --
29. In which I discuss my role in the publication of biblical, devotional, and historical literature: 1947-55 --
30. In which I go away to Washington, D.C., to develop my historical, anthropological, and archival methodologies --
31. In which we look at the Davuilevu plan for raising a Fijian ministry adequate for the coming independent conference and finish with a wedding 32. In which I reflect on my departure from Fiji --
33. In which I survey my missiology in 1961, see my family established in Springvale, and accept an invitation from Dr. D. A. McGavran --
34. In which I join Dr. Donald McGavran and get involved in the establishment of the Institute of Church Growth at Eugene, Oregon, eventually returning to Australia for Joan's wedding --
35. In which Edna and I visit Fiji for the inauguration of the independent conference, en route to the Solomon Islands on a WCC assignment, taking up residence at Rarumana, Wanawana --
36. In which I investigate the religious and psychic phenomena of the Western Solomons schism and its theological significance --
37. In which we sail about the Eastern Solomons, share the village life at Fouia, Malaita, and speculate on the experience as a missiologist's apprenticeship --
38. In which, as a missionary anthropologist, I play my part in establishing the School of World Mission at Pasadena, selling the idea to America, and confronting theologians --
39. In which the missionary anthropologist has to establish himself as an applied anthropologist with his secular professional peers --
40. In which I visit Mexico, initiating the CGRILA team in their data-collecting techniques --
41. In which I discuss the Americanisation of our family lifestyle --
42. In which I visit Ethiopia and research the tribes in the southwest near the borders of Sudan and Kenya --
43. In which I visit Guatemala for a Maja Indian pastors' conference and attend a fiesta --
44. In which I investigate the library research resources in Oceania and evaluate Michener's novel, Hawaii --
45. In which I get involved in missiological research in Navaholand and establish this as a regular research field near the SWM --
46. In which I visit Switzerland for the Lausanne Congress and attend other conferences at Frankfurt and Oxford --
47. In which, after a detour to New Zealand, I do a lecturing tour through Papua New Guinea, returning to America via Australia, Fiji, and Honolulu --
48. In which I discuss the creation of missiological literature, and its adequacy for postcolonial mission, and my part in the program --
49. In which I prepare for my ultimate retirement, return to Australia vis Fiji, with all kinds of expectations but no certainties of any kind --
50. In which, after a brief stop over in Fiji, we return to Springvale, become pensioners, settle down in Canberra, and consider a theology of retirement 51. In which I research the family records, travel through Victoria visiting the historical landmarks, and reflect again on my own belonging --
52. In which my global missiology is phased out, and I accommodate myself to a process of localisation in an Australian context --
53. In which I backtrack to examine the phasing out of my life as a cross-cultural researcher internationalist visiting America, New Zealand, Bali, and Papua New Guinea: 1978-81 --
54. In which I narrate the story of a research library from several different viewpoints, how it came into being, and what it stands for --
55. In which I show how my boyhood hobby has continually been my sanity saver and is the delight of my retirement as I reflect on its role in the process of aging --
56. In which I am aware of mounting pressures and an atmosphere of finality, and assess my return to visit America: 1986 --
57. In which, having no continuing city, I seek one to come --
Epilogue: Twenty-five years later.
Título de la serie: Missiology of Alan R. Tippett series.
Responsabilidad: The missiology of Alan R. Tippett, Doug Priest and Charles H. Kraft, Editors.

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Datos enlazados


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