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No passion spent : essays 1978-1995

Author: George Steiner
Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, ©1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
George Steiner is one of the preeminent essayists and literary thinkers of our era. In this remarkable book he concerns himself with language and the relation of language to literature and to religion. Written during a period when the art of reading and the status of a text have been threatened by literary movements that question their validity and by computer technology, Steiner's essays affirm the primacy of  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Essays
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: George Steiner
ISBN: 0300066309 9780300066302 0300074409 9780300074406
OCLC Number: 34978808
Notes: Includes index.
Description: xi, 430 p. ; 23 cm.
Contents: The uncommon reader (1978) --
Real presences (1985) --
A preface to the Hebrew Bible (1996) --
Homer in English (1996) --
A reading against Shakespeare (1986) --
Absolute tragedy (1990) --
What is comparative literature? (1994) --
Drumming on the doors - Péguy (1992) --
Sainte Simone - Simone Weil (1993) --
Trusting in reason - Husserl (1994) --
An exact art (1982) --
The historicity of dreams (1983) --
Totem or taboo (1988) --
A note on Kafka's "trial' (1992) --
On Kierkegaard (1994) --
The archives of Eden (1981) --
Our homeland, the text (1985) --
Through that glass darkly (1991) --
The great tautology (1992) --
Two cocks (1993) --
Two suppers (1995).
Responsibility: George Steiner.

Abstract:

George Steiner is one of the preeminent essayists and literary thinkers of our era. In this remarkable book he concerns himself with language and the relation of language to literature and to religion. Written during a period when the art of reading and the status of a text have been threatened by literary movements that question their validity and by computer technology, Steiner's essays affirm the primacy of reading in the classical sense. Steiner covers a wide range of subjects, from the Hebrew Bible, Homer, and Shakespeare to Kafka, Kierkegaard, Simone Weil, Husserl, and Freud. The theme of Judaism's tragic destiny winds through his thinking, in particular as he muses about whether Jewish scripture and the Talmud are the Jew's true homeland, about the parallels between the "last supper" of Socrates and the Last Supper of Jesus, and about the necessity for Christians to hold themselves accountable for their invective and impotence during the Holocaust.

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